Learning Percussion

dxdrummer

Member
Hey guys,

I've been a drummer for 8 years, and I've been interested in getting into percussion as well. I'm mostly looking at bongos, congas, and timbales, but I'm also interested in learning keyboard instruments (xylophone, marimba, vibraphone, etc) and some of the simpler auxiliary percussion (cowbell & triangle)

For those of you who play percussion, how did you learn? Are there any sites you'd recommend, or is the best way to just get a teacher? (I'm in college so I don't have the time/money for a teacher)
 
W

wy yung

Guest
Try Conga place.com Great site.

The best books for congas are IMO those by Tomas Cruz. There are three volumes.

http://www.wikio.com/books/mel-bay-the-tomas-cruz-conga-method-vol-i-conga-technique-as-taught-in-cuba-book-dvd-0786670819-807514,b.html

Tito Puente and Jim Payne wrote a decent timbale book. Chanquito's book is also good.

Some of the bongo books are a bit iffy. I cannot really recommend one over another.

There are Latin music threads on site where I have left links as well.

Good luck.
 

randrade89

Senior Member
Hello there. For keyboard instruments I would recommend the modern school book by Morris Goldenberg. I used it a lot at the conservatory.
 

stevedrum

Member
Just about almost 2 years ago I was in your exact same situation. I was learning drums for almost 5 years and I wanted to get into percussion and mallet percussion. I think the best way to go is finding a teacher, usually you would have to find 2 seperate teachers actually. If you want books then i suggest you go to amazon and try search there. For hand percussions (congas, bongos etc.) its quite difficult to find a good book as there aren't a lot available.
 

cathartic_j

Senior Member
Hey guys,
I've been a drummer for 8 years, and I've been interested in getting into percussion as well. I'm mostly looking at bongos, congas, and timbales, but I'm also interested in learning keyboard instruments (xylophone, marimba, vibraphone, etc) and some of the simpler auxiliary percussion (cowbell & triangle)

For those of you who play percussion, how did you learn? Are there any sites you'd recommend, or is the best way to just get a teacher? (I'm in college so I don't have the time/money for a teacher)
Being new to the forum, I was wondering if anyone here was into keyboard percussion!

I learned because I started playing as part of my school district's music program, so I played orchestral music from fifth grade through graduating high school. In that time, I did quite a bit of keyboard percussion playing -- particularly marimba and (jazz) vibraphone. I think the time I've spent playing keyboard percussion has made me a much better musician, and I highly recommend you pursue it. Here's my advice:

-Find a teacher. Try to find out if the school district in your area has listings for private teachers for students. Those are the percussion teachers who are much more likely to have some knowledge/experience with keyboard and orchestral percussion. If you have a store in your area that sells/rents band and orchestra instruments, they may have a list as well. I don't know how to get around the time issue -- you need to to practice something to learn it -- but as for money, if you're a good player with solid technique, you could consider finding a beginning student or two to teach drum set technique. The money you earn from that could go towards your own lessons.

-For simple auxiliary or concert percussion, you can learn enough to get by with "good" triangle technique just takes a few minutes. Here's a good summary of technique for a few of the more common instruments, courtesy of the United States Army(!).

-For keyboard percussion, I'd second randrade's recommendation of Goldenberg as an excellent starting book. If you don't know how to read music written in treble and bass clefs, you can learn from pretty much any beginner piano book; I used Alfred's when I was a kid, and it did the trick. The biggest issue is finding an instrument to practice on -- if you have the money to buy one, that's awesome, but otherwise, you'll have to ask around. If your college/university is large enough to have a half-decent music department, they should have some practice instruments, so you should inquire about getting access to them.

-As for Latin percussion, I think it depends on how much you want to learn. Basic technique can be picked up pretty easily from a good book or instructional video (wy young has those covered).
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
Love my congas! Work with a teacher because there are hand drumming techniques which can open a new world for you. If you buy congas, buy a professional grade (used is okay). If budget is an issue, then start out with only one drum; you can add another in a year.

GJS
 
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