Lazy Guitarists...

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Very disturbing. I'm talking about the fact that you're weren't in the headlining band Dr. Fatso. Like, what's up with that? It must have been Motorhead or somebody like that after you guys, right?
Just re-united with an old band from years past, and suffice to say there is no following, yet. As with the case in most originals bands, you gotta start somewhere. Definitely don't mind supporting other local bands, either.

Did the guy actually whip out a bow and literally fiddle with the string? I thought you needed 2 strings to fiddle. :p You're an ass. :p
Man, it was worse. I condensed a few minutes of him standing there doing something to the string and trying to mime to the audience that he might have a guitar problem. It was literally the worst thing I've seen done on stage. All could have been avoided by having a backup guitar in wait. Instead, he brought two guitars and neither could back the other up in his mind anyway. He had a 7 string, and a 12 string electric.

What is needed is a sure fire method to correct the problem, for the greater good. Like maybe an electric shock sent through the strings when the volume is up and the tuner is on.
This sounds a bit like a fetish that I'm not sure I share. I think we've all been up there once or twice while a stringed-instrument player did something embarrassing. You move on. Better than making a bigger deal out of a big fuck up.

Guitar manufacturers could eliminate this problem altogether and incorporate a "tuner detector circuit" that automatically disables the volume when a tuner is detected. For the greater good. The needs of the many outweigh the ignorance of the few.
In the past, I've wondered about perhaps something like an electric guitar with something akin to "auto-tune" for voice, wherein if a string starts to become out of tune, the system would automatically adjust the tone of the resulting note from what's played. I'm really not sure about all the related implications or issues that might arise, but I liked the idea back when I played more guitar.

Thoughts Fatso?
Just one. "Pizza".
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
It wasn't so long ago that tuning on stage and being a bit out of tune was no great drama. Dropped sticks. Long shredding solos. Singer babbling between songs. Noodling between songs. It was sub-optimal but no one was too worried as long as the music got people partying.

If Dave Grohl was dead he'd be turning in his grave.

I guess this is one of those "You know you're a dinosaur when ..." moments.
Aren't all of these things a question of degree?

Adjusting tuning on stage is ok, I guess, as long as we're talking about an adjustment and not replacing the strings...and as long as volume is turned way down to do it.

Sticks get dropped...it happens.

There's that line between singer babbling and communicating with the audience...and in my band it's something that the drummer does!

Long solos are fine, as long as they are tonally interesting and not just a muso jerkoff.
 

keepitgreen

Senior Member
A good friend of mine who is a lead guitarist in a local band told me about these:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4B5Jpc3ftJ0

We were having a long discussion about instruments and technology, and he started talking about these automatic guitar tuners. The really amazing part is that you can pre-set tunings in them also, so if you want to play a song in your set in a different tuning (drop D or whatever), you just press a button and WHAMMO, the guitar is in that tuning.

I wonder if any drum company would ever develop something like this for drums..... Would there ever be a need? Not for alternate tunings for drums, but for keeping drums "tuned"?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Aren't all of these things a question of degree?

Adjusting tuning on stage is ok, I guess, as long as we're talking about an adjustment and not replacing the strings...and as long as volume is turned way down to do it.

Sticks get dropped...it happens.

There's that line between singer babbling and communicating with the audience...and in my band it's something that the drummer does!

Long solos are fine, as long as they are tonally interesting and not just a muso jerkoff.
Damn you didn't bite.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Thing is, I've seen great gigs where the guitarist stops and tunes. The audience understands that tuning happens in music, they talk amongst themselves for a while and then the music starts again.

It's seems that the "standards are lifting" and what was once thought of as "warts and all" has become sanitised and clean, with all warts carefully hidden away. While we're at it, don't forget to to keep your pinkies raised as you sip your beverages, sweetie darlings ;)
 

azrae1l

Silver Member
i always find these kinds of threads funny....


yet explains why i never felt "welcomed" in this forum....
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Thing is, I've seen great gigs where the guitarist stops and tunes. The audience understands that tuning happens in music, they talk amongst themselves for a while and then the music starts again.

It's seems that the "standards are lifting" and what was once thought of as "warts and all" has become sanitised and clean, with all warts carefully hidden away. While we're at it, don't forget to to keep your pinkies raised as you sip your beverages, sweetie darlings ;)
It's all a bit like the rock-and-roll-no-longer-very-rock-and-roll thread.

Now, the real question is this: Are audiences numbed by "live" music such as that shown on Latvian X Rated Idols Got Talent so that they expect real live music to look like that, or have musicians upped their professionalism to the point where warts are no longer tolerated?

I do know that the last time my band played out, we totally screwed up the start to a song, laughed, gathered ourselves up and re-started, and nailed it. The audience laughed along with us. (No, Larry, not at us, deffinly with us!)

Pinkie aloft....mwah! mwah!
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
It's seems that the "standards are lifting" and what was once thought of as "warts and all" has become sanitised and clean, with all warts carefully hidden away. While we're at it, don't forget to to keep your pinkies raised as you sip your beverages, sweetie darlings ;)
I think the line is still where it needs to be. There's a big difference between a 10 second fix-up of a Les Paul's perpetually out-of-tune G string and taking 2 full minutes while trying to figure out your instrument.

Singers have a really rough time when the guitar is out of tune.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
Thing is, I've seen great gigs where the guitarist stops and tunes. The audience understands that tuning happens in music, they talk amongst themselves for a while and then the music starts again.

It's seems that the "standards are lifting" and what was once thought of as "warts and all" has become sanitised and clean, with all warts carefully hidden away. While we're at it, don't forget to to keep your pinkies raised as you sip your beverages, sweetie darlings ;)
Agree with you.

Our guitarist is short sighted but won't wear glasses. He has a tuner but at least once per gig he will call back to me to "lend him my glasses" so that he can fine tune his guitar.

Always gives the audience a laugh. Fine by us.
 

Galadrm

Senior Member
Good to hear all the responses guys, happy to see pretty much all of you agree with where I stand.

We have a rule at rehearsals......No noodling between songs, and that means everybody. Tuning must be done silently.

On stage...Anyone playing anything between numbers gets dragged home behind the van after the show. Its not only un profesional, its downright ignorant when you have an audience to entertain. Tuners cost next to nothing, compared to a Fender or a Gibson guitar.
I definitely like this rule, just have to find a way to implement it. Since I joined the band and tried to cut a lot of that crap out we must have increased our practice efficiency by 500% not kidding. We used to learn 2 songs in 3 hours which was a joke, now we can learn a set in the time it takes to play the songs. And yes, I also believe that entertaining the audience is priority number 1. For some reason the guitarists always want to be part of the actual party. When we are getting paid to put on a show I think doing this is fairly unprofessional.

Just curious.. i will never play in a band and thus don't know the struggles.. is it that hard to find a new guitarist to replace ones that make you nuts...

P.S. tuning at full volume at a gig.. have never seen that in my life unless it was like 1 string was a touch out..
Very surprised you have never seen a guitarist tuning out loud. Never have I seen it when at a 'big band' gig like foo fighters QOTSA Tool, but often at smaller gigs like where my band will play around town. Also despite their unprofessionalism, our band has a really great writing chemistry, at least so I think. Unfortunately although it may be easy to find another guitarist, finding one to write with in the style that we do would be much harder.

I think the line is still where it needs to be. There's a big difference between a 10 second fix-up of a Les Paul's perpetually out-of-tune G string and taking 2 full minutes while trying to figure out your instrument.

Singers have a really rough time when the guitar is out of tune.
Yes I think this is the point. There is a difference between doing a full tune up/down as opposed to a minor adjustment. Why is it always the G string!!! My tele is the best guitar I have ever handled at keeping in tune, but even the G string slips out sometimes.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Why is it always the G string!!! My tele is the best guitar I have ever handled at keeping in tune, but even the G string slips out sometimes.
G strings are problematic for a few reasons. They straddle the border of what would/should be a wound string. They often get bound at the nut and pop due to lack of lubrication. On certain guitars (Les Paul), the angle from the nut to the peg results in the D and G detuning faster than the other strings. Last reason is because it's the string most often used for bends by blues-based players.

A lot of the issue is resolved by upgrading to a quality, properly cut/sized nut and using graphite to lubricate the channel. You may also wish to replace the plastic nut on your Tele with bone or composite. There's a brand that even makes a faux-ivory called TUSQ that I've heard good things about. I've always used cow-bone personally simply due to availability.
 

Galadrm

Senior Member
G strings are problematic for a few reasons. They straddle the border of what would/should be a wound string. They often get bound at the nut and pop due to lack of lubrication. On certain guitars (Les Paul), the angle from the nut to the peg results in the D and G detuning faster than the other strings. Last reason is because it's the string most often used for bends by blues-based players.

A lot of the issue is resolved by upgrading to a quality, properly cut/sized nut and using graphite to lubricate the channel. You may also wish to replace the plastic nut on your Tele with bone or composite. There's a brand that even makes a faux-ivory called TUSQ that I've heard good things about. I've always used cow-bone personally simply due to availability.
Wow great insight haha I wasn't expecting an answer! Better info than what I could get on a guitar forum haha, Drummerworld has everything you need. Might have to check out a new nut, though I always keep the current one well lubricated.
 
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