Krupa & Papa Jo Jones upclose and personal clips from "Born to Swing"

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Papa jo was a huge influence when I was in High school.Thats why I wasn't really shocked to see guys like Joe Morello and later Bonzo,throwing the sticks away,and playing with their hands.

I first read about him in Downbeat magazine,and saw him a couple of times at Frank Ipolitos drum shop in Manhattan.That place was like drum heaven back then

I'll bet to this day,there are guys then believe Bonham invented that.

There's even some disparity as to who invented the modern hi hat.Some say(himself included) that Papa Jo invented it,and some say Wallberg of Wallberg&Auge invented it.

No doubt the man was an amazing drummer.Even today,his chops and solos like Krupas still hold up.

I don't know if the CD is still available,but it's called "The Essential Jo Jones".

If you can find it,it's great collection of some seroius jazz,and some amazing drumming.

Thanks for posting that.

Steve B
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
How cool it would have been to be able to walk in to his store and pick up some lessons or even just to hang out.
That's how NY City was in the 60's and most of the 70's.Even into the 90's there pockets of small and larger drum shops and music stores where at any given time,you'd walk in and there would be somebody that would give you pause.

Sometimes even impropto jam sessions would break out.

I met Joe Morello in the early 90's, in a an upstart drumstore/studio in of all places Staten Island.That's where I took several lessons from him,before my career schedule made taking futher lessons impossible.

Jim Chapin,also taught in the same studio.He was a blast also.

I've met all kinds of musicians and actors,being a NYPD detective on the upper west side of Manhattan(NY City to tourists)

Some were cool,others not so much.I should make a list someday.Papa Jo was "cool" personified.If you look in the dictionary under "cool".you'll see Papa Jo Jones picture.

There was something to be said about growing up in NY City

My apoligies to the OP for the temporary Hi Jack..sorry dmacc

Steve B
 

dmacc

Platinum Member
Papa jo was a huge influence when I was in High school.Thats why I wasn't really shocked to see guys like Joe Morello and later Bonzo,throwing the sticks away,and playing with their hands.

I first read about him in Downbeat magazine,and saw him a couple of times at Frank Ipolitos drum shop in Manhattan.That place was like drum heaven back then

I'll bet to this day,there are guys then believe Bonham invented that.

There's even some disparity as to who invented the modern hi hat.Some say(himself included) that Papa Jo invented it,and some say Wallberg of Wallberg&Auge invented it.

No doubt the man was an amazing drummer.Even today,his chops and solos like Krupas still hold up.

I don't know if the CD is still available,but it's called "The Essential Jo Jones".

If you can find it,it's great collection of some seroius jazz,and some amazing drumming.

Thanks for posting that.

Steve B
You are one lucky person to have been able to experience the scene at Frank Ipolitos. Stories are legendary.

I owned that record you're talking about: "The Essential Jo Jones". I have The Main Man", another one of his solo albums on CD. I'll need to scoop "The Essentials" up.

...
My apoligies to the OP for the temporary Hi Jack..sorry dmacc
Steve B
No apologies needed. All of it fits perfectly in this context. Share!!! One of my best and most influential instructors shared many stories with me from NYC as well.
 

eddypierce

Senior Member
Jo Jones was the best. I love that footage of him. I haven't seen the Krupa footage, but I'll check it out when I get the chance.

I owned that record you're talking about: "The Essential Jo Jones". I have The Main Man", another one of his solo albums on CD. I'll need to scoop "The Essentials" up.
Another couple of good ones: The Everest Years (which contains two albums on one CD: a trio recording from 1958, and a larger combo recording from 1960), and Our Man Papa Jo. This last one was his last recording as a leader, from the early 1980's. I bought it on CD in the early 90's, and unfortunately let someone borrow it about 15 years ago and never got it back. Now it's out of print. I've heard some say (e.g., Burt Korall in his book on Swing-era drummers) that this this album was disappointing, because illness had hurt Jones' facility by this time, but I found it incredibly musical and inspiring.
 

Ian Ballard

Silver Member
Papa Jo IS the drums and everything before and after owes something to him for either taking it forward and for influencing everybody who mattered afterwards. I love Krupa but Papa Jo really had it all. The big smile, the drive, the swing and his clear love for the music can't be denied. They simply don't make 'em like that anymore. Class act!
 

radman

Senior Member
Papa Jo IS the drums and everything before and after owes something to him for either taking it forward and for influencing everybody who mattered afterwards. I love Krupa but Papa Jo really had it all. The big smile, the drive, the swing and his clear love for the music can't be denied. They simply don't make 'em like that anymore. Class act!
+1
Papa Jo's playing was just so, so smoooooth. I had seen that footage before, but it never ceases to amaze me.

Nice to hear that he was as cool in person too (never can tell with some of these guys... lol).

Thanks for the post dmacc. It's good to see it, to get myself "reset". I have a couple low volume jazz trio gigs coming up ... I need to get my Papa Jo stick control in check. Still the bar IMHO ... ;-)

best,
radman
 
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