Kenny Jones Ripping it Up With The Small Faces

I think Roger's been pretty steadfast over the years that Kenney Jones was a fine drummer, just not the right drummer for The Who, and that seems pretty accurate to me. Kenney's more in the Ringo Starr/Charlie Watts pocket drummer vein, rather than a frenetic force of nature like Keith Moon. With the right band, Jones is excellent. The Who just wasn't the right fit.
 

DrummerCA35

Senior Member
I remember seeing the "eminence front" video a loooong time ago as a kid watching MTV. I remember seeing Jones in the video and this huge drumkit and watching him play a very simple beat on this huge drumkit and feeling like there was some kind of disconnect. I love groove/pocket music songs...but this was the Who! I remember being totally underwhelmed by both his visuals AND watching him play/sync in that video, thinking that even I, as a then 12 year old, could have played that.

I mean, years later, I love playing along to that song, and I don't think anything else but a simple beat would have fit, but still...even now I'm underwhelmed thinking about Jones with that huge drumset playing that simple beat to that song and the lack of any kind of visual showmanship at all. I can't believe that Moon, had he lived, or another drummer couldn't have added some of the who flavor to that track and still nailed the groove.

I'm sure he's a wonderful drummer, he'd HAVE to be to have played with the likes of the Who...but I gotta agree with the above posts...a great drummer, but not a fit for the Who. In my humble opinion.
 
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Right—that's why they offered him the gig; the Faces and the Who were mod friends and rivals, so it seemed like an obvious fit. But as so often happens, what would seem to make sense in theory doesn't always work out in practice.
 

David Hunter

Junior Member
It was Pete who wanted restraint, much like his own drumming style on the demos he presented to the band. He'd been trying to rein in Moonie for several years to sound more like what he heard in his head (ex: "Relay" and "Join Together").

After Keith died, Kenney was the logical choice, as The Who and Small Faces had been tour mates (and pals) since the '60s. Kenney had just come off a very successful run with The Faces, he was a proven excellent drummer, a total pro, and was able to provide Pete the solid foundation he'd been yearning for. I remember reading at the time how relieved John Entwistle was to have a solid backbeat to play along with.

I agree that the results were lukewarm, but I feel that no matter WHO they'd chosen to replace Keith, they would have played what Pete wanted regardless. That said, I blame Pete, not Kenney.
 

Bruce M. Thomson

Gold Member
Well said. One thing I liked in this performance was how he kept the solo in the same feel as the song it self.Also I think but I am not sure that Daltry walked back his criticism.


It was Pete who wanted restraint, much like his own drumming style on the demos he presented to the band. He'd been trying to rein in Moonie for several years to sound more like what he heard in his head (ex: "Relay" and "Join Together").

After Keith died, Kenney was the logical choice, as The Who and Small Faces had been tour mates (and pals) since the '60s. Kenney had just come off a very successful run with The Faces, he was a proven excellent drummer, a total pro, and was able to provide Pete the solid foundation he'd been yearning for. I remember reading at the time how relieved John Entwistle was to have a solid backbeat to play along with.

I agree that the results were lukewarm, but I feel that no matter WHO they'd chosen to replace Keith, they would have played what Pete wanted regardless. That said, I blame Pete, not Kenney.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
Kenny is a great drummer but not as loose as Moon who made fills fit no matter how off the wall they seemed. I'll paraphrase since I can't remember the exact verbage, but Moon once said "I'm the greatest Keith Moon style drummer in the world." He was right. Trying to replace him in the Who is futile. Zak Starkey is NO Keith Moon yet seems to get the job done without any flourish. Back to Kenny Jones. He is a great time keeper and pocket guy.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
It was Pete who wanted restraint, much like his own drumming style on the demos he presented to the band. He'd been trying to rein in Moonie for several years to sound more like what he heard in his head (ex: "Relay" and "Join Together").

After Keith died, Kenney was the logical choice, as The Who and Small Faces had been tour mates (and pals) since the '60s. Kenney had just come off a very successful run with The Faces, he was a proven excellent drummer, a total pro, and was able to provide Pete the solid foundation he'd been yearning for. I remember reading at the time how relieved John Entwistle was to have a solid backbeat to play along with.

I agree that the results were lukewarm, but I feel that no matter WHO they'd chosen to replace Keith, they would have played what Pete wanted regardless. That said, I blame Pete, not Kenney.
^ This.

Pete knew no one could replace Moon, so he wanted someone who just couldn't be looked at as a replacement, but instead a new direction.

Prior to Moon's death, the Who had slowed way down on touring, in part because Pete grew weary of Keith's antics, and unreliability on stage. Whereas with Kenny, Pete went back to "let's tour as much as possible" until the burn out set in and they broke up.

Roger was the only one who was ever critical of Kenny.

Also, kind of odd, Kenny was one of the last people to see Keith alive.

But I've never been critical of Kenny. I wore out my cassette of "Who's Last" the live album with Kenny in high school. And I absolutely love the Face Dances album.
 

DaleClark

Senior Member
I remember seeing the "eminence front" video a loooong time ago as a kid watching MTV. I remember seeing Jones in the video and this huge drumkit and watching him play a very simple beat on this huge drumkit and feeling like there was some kind of disconnect. I love groove/pocket music songs...but this was the Who! I remember being totally underwhelmed by both his visuals AND watching him play/sync in that video, thinking that even I, as a then 12 year old, could have played that.

I mean, years later, I love playing along to that song, and I don't think anything else but a simple beat would have fit, but still...even now I'm underwhelmed thinking about Jones with that huge drumset playing that simple beat to that song and the lack of any kind of visual showmanship at all. I can't believe that Moon, had he lived, or another drummer couldn't have added some of the who flavor to that track and still nailed the groove.

I'm sure he's a wonderful drummer, he'd HAVE to be to have played with the likes of the Who...but I gotta agree with the above posts...a great drummer, but not a fit for the Who. In my humble opinion.
Actually, Jones used the entire drum set quite a bit with The Who live. Even if Carl Palmer, Billy Cobham, or any other "large kit" drummers sat in, it would look and feel weird. I still have a difficult time watching Deep Purple without Blackmore. It's just when someone had such an identity and thumbprint on the band, its hard for anyone else to seem as though they "fit".
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
I thought his style with the Who was a little more about precision and hard/solid hitting. Sounds like he's really laying into that Eminence Front groove, especially the tom fills. Dudes solid.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
It was Pete who wanted restraint, much like his own drumming style on the demos he presented to the band. He'd been trying to rein in Moonie for several years to sound more like what he heard in his head (ex: "Relay" and "Join Together").

After Keith died, Kenney was the logical choice, as The Who and Small Faces had been tour mates (and pals) since the '60s. Kenney had just come off a very successful run with The Faces, he was a proven excellent drummer, a total pro, and was able to provide Pete the solid foundation he'd been yearning for. I remember reading at the time how relieved John Entwistle was to have a solid backbeat to play along with.

I agree that the results were lukewarm, but I feel that no matter WHO they'd chosen to replace Keith, they would have played what Pete wanted regardless. That said, I blame Pete, not Kenney.
Good info.

And when I read Pete's autobiography it angered me. Here he had the quintessential rock rhythm section and couldn't hold it together. Pete comes off as such an arrogant prig.
 
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