Kaytranada featuring Karriem Riggins - Bus Ride

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Ironic that you use the word sleep because that to me was very repetitious and boring. Maybe the rest of the song gets better but other than some hi-hat playing I just didn't get it.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
nice high hat work, especially 1:40 on. the drums suddenly cut out at times, for a neat catchy effect. But what do I know, for I am totally hip-hop ignorant.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I just didn't like the repetitive 2 chords. Drumming was OK but like I said the music was droll.
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
its got that awesome/bizarre J Dilla feel. dig it. great sounds too.
exactly

I understand if hip hop is not your thing and you don't understand what someone is going for you won't get it

I guess people look for drum acrobatics when they listen to music

the brilliance of how he glitches the beat... a la Dilla and RZA... the way he tugs then drags the beats ... pure brilliance and extremely difficult to execute

glad to see a couple guys who get it ... I actually expected more people to be up on this style being on a drum forum and all
 

Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
That was pretty friggin awesome. It reminded me of Chris Dave.

The almost-yet-not off-kilter feel, the initial sparseness followed by the hi-hat, snare interplay at the end add up to some very high level of groove expression.

Nice.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Kariem and Dilla with that Detroit nasty. Love what these cats are doing. Ahead of their time. The young jazz musicians have been influenced by hip-hop because it's the music of their generation, so they fuse the styles organically. Same as Tony was influenced by The Beatles.

I sat about 10 feet from Kariem in a jazz club in Detroit and he was playing these old pies with serious cracks and splits in them. Sounded beautiful. Total artist. Clean as a mother****** also, I might add, in some serious spats.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Tony...the way he tugs then drags the beats ... pure brilliance and extremely difficult to execute

Jeff....The almost-yet-not off-kilter feel,

I am afraid if one of us lesser forum members had submitted this same audio, we would have been told to practice with a metronome. And yet here it is brilliant. Can't have it both ways in my opinion.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Well, I think context is everything.

Playing a classic rock song, this type of drum feel wouldn't fit. Just like backbeats and metronomic time wouldn't work in a rubato passage in chamber music.

But this is an evolution of the style of music. Just like free jazz was a reaction to bebop. Modern music made with machines started out metronomically perfect. So introducing a feel where there is an interesting push and pull of tempo and beat displacement makes for an appealing contrast (for some, not all, I know).

These musicians aren't making mistakes; it is a conscious way to take the music to a different place.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
To me, the non-perfect time gives it a human quality and creates a real mood. It's interesting to my ear, it doesn't "numb" my ear like music with perfect grid time can do. Perfect time is not interesting to my ear. I tend to dismiss the time in a "grid" type recording because everything feels the same, no surprises. Boring! My ear is looking for something else interesting, because the click time is a snore for me. That's why I like music that won't line up to a click, it's organic. It keeps me on my toes. Even though the time is non-perfect, you can clearly hear the mastery of the time in there.

It's funny, you have to have a mastery of time to make non-perfect time work. A beginner who makes mistakes with the time...that doesn't work.
 

spleeeeen

Platinum Member
To me, the non-perfect time gives it a human quality and creates a real mood. It's interesting to my ear, it doesn't "numb" my ear like music with perfect grid time can do. It keeps my interest. Perfect time is not interesting to my ear. That's why I like music that won't line up to a click, it's organic. Even though the time is non-perfect, you can clearly hear the mastery of the time in there.
Yes, it's intentionally "non-perfect." Make no mistake, this cat is controlling the space down to the smallest of subdivisions while also weaving in and out of lopes. It's nuanced in a way that makes it sound like maybe someone spliced some reel-to-reel tape together.

Some samples of Karriem's playing alone:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlYw11GD2wY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4T4Jn7Byzs
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
Tony...the way he tugs then drags the beats ... pure brilliance and extremely difficult to execute

Jeff....The almost-yet-not off-kilter feel,

I am afraid if one of us lesser forum members had submitted this same audio, we would have been told to practice with a metronome. And yet here it is brilliant. Can't have it both ways in my opinion.
this is a style of drumming started by drummers emulating the sound of certain early loop machines that had software glitches causing the beat to jump and tug when the producer attempted to quantize

these software glitches became the signature sound of guys like RZA and J Dilla ... later hip hop drummers adopted the sound and started a whole underground clan of drummers who play this way not unlike guys like Jojo Mayer and KJ Sawka who emulate the drum&bass and jungle drumming

here is one of the popular software glitch beats

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hIbFu10Yec

here is Questlove playing a really nice one on D'Angelos album .... he is one of the best at it in my opinion

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQ6ADCTmaNA

an open mind is a good thing
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Tony, I'm split on this big time. Even though I'm a simple backbeat blinkered player, I have a very eclectic "like" list, & (I think) an open mind. I've listened to the clip you posted several times over, & although I get the intention in the placements, it just doesn't work for me - on any level actually.

I listened to the other links you posted, & I absolutely dial into those examples. My undisputed favourite exponent of this craft is Richard Spaven, although most seem to prefer Chris Dave (who is undoubtably a super talented guy). To me, Richard really takes the craft to a new & different level whilst being ultra musical IMHO. Maybe it's my own closed mindedness that I'm not aware of - probably is, but I can only recant what I think.

For those unfamiliar with Richard Spaven, here's a link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaP1BCphbXQ

Funny you should sight KJ Sawka. I spent some R&R time with Kevin a few years back, & we discussed his approach to manipulation in some detail. It's something that interests me greatly, although I doubt I'll ever be lucky or talented / dedicated enough to explore the possibilities playing with others.
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
Tony, I'm split on this big time. Even though I'm a simple backbeat blinkered player, I have a very eclectic "like" list, & (I think) an open mind. I've listened to the clip you posted several times over, & although I get the intention in the placements, it just doesn't work for me - on any level actually.

I listened to the other links you posted, & I absolutely dial into those examples. My undisputed favourite exponent of this craft is Richard Spaven, although most seem to prefer Chris Dave (who is undoubtably a super talented guy). To me, Richard really takes the craft to a new & different level whilst being ultra musical IMHO. Maybe it's my own closed mindedness that I'm not aware of - probably is, but I can only recant what I think.

For those unfamiliar with Richard Spaven, here's a link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaP1BCphbXQ

Funny you should sight KJ Sawka. I spent some R&R time with Kevin a few years back, & we discussed his approach to manipulation in some detail. It's something that interests me greatly, although I doubt I'll ever be lucky or talented / dedicated enough to explore the possibilities playing with others.
very nice playing but not the same thing at all ...
 
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