Just how much would a "Snare side" die cast hoop dry out your snare?

BigDinSD

Gold Member
I've got a Stewart Copeland Tama COB snare, 5x14. They come with a die cast batter side hoop. I have an Evans ST batter on it right now, and actually it sounds quite nice. I want to elminate JUST A LITTLE MORE of the ring (which is actually not too bad, as it is a Brass drum).

Other than a wad of moongel, HD DRY head or remo rings, do you think a die cast "Snare side" hoop would eliminate more ring?
 

veggo32

Silver Member
just go ahead and do it, whats the worse that can happen? If you don't like it just resell it. To me it seems that your convinced it will dry it out just that right amount so why not try it?
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I've got a Stewart Copeland Tama COB snare, 5x14. They come with a die cast batter side hoop. I have an Evans ST batter on it right now, and actually it sounds quite nice. I want to elminate JUST A LITTLE MORE of the ring (which is actually not too bad, as it is a Brass drum).

Other than a wad of moongel, HD DRY head or remo rings, do you think a die cast "Snare side" hoop would eliminate more ring?
Hey - I already tried this on my Copeland when I first got it because I wanted it to look the same top and bottom, and there's a reason why it is the way it is. The die cast on the bottom really dried it out - hard to believe, but it did. It also made an already heavy drum even heavier. So I took it off. I want mine to sing at all tunings.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Bo's right. Counter intuitive I know, but the snare side hoop has almost as much influence on the resultant characteristics as the batter side hoop. Think of it in terms of adding overall mass to the drum.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Bo's right. Counter intuitive I know, but the snare side hoop has almost as much influence on the resultant characteristics as the batter side hoop. Think of it in terms of adding overall mass to the drum.
I got lucky, I did my test at Pro Drum with Stan, so I never bought the hoop in the first place ;)
 

BigDinSD

Gold Member
I don't think for the money you would spend on a one it would be worth it.

I don't know if it would really help at all actually.
They ain't cheap...

just go ahead and do it, whats the worse that can happen? If you don't like it just resell it. To me it seems that your convinced it will dry it out just that right amount so why not try it?
Yeah true...I've got another 14" ten lug snare it can go on.

Bo's right. Counter intuitive I know, but the snare side hoop has almost as much influence on the resultant characteristics as the batter side hoop. Think of it in terms of adding overall mass to the drum.
That might be good here...

Hey - I already tried this on my Copeland when I first got it because I wanted it to look the same top and bottom, and there's a reason why it is the way it is. The die cast on the bottom really dried it out - hard to believe, but it did. It also made an already heavy drum even heavier. So I took it off. I want mine to sing at all tunings.
They do sing...nicely. I'm stoked that choice is avail. Just a tad drier for me I'm hoping.
 

tard

Gold Member
I put die cast hoops on one of my maple snares and really couldnt tell much of a difference to be honest.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
To my ear there's no question die cast hoops focus the tone. I currently have them on my Black Beauty. The difference between the cast and the flanged is obvious.
 

Skitch

Pioneer Member
To my ear there's no question die cast hoops focus the tone. I currently have them on my Black Beauty. The difference between the cast and the flanged is obvious.
Same for me on a DW snare drum. It may be the best sounding wood snare drum I have ever owned. There were not many, if any, annoying overtones out of the drum in that room.

Mike

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I too put a die cast on the snare side of my Copeland, although I dig the uniformity.. I haven't noticed any significant sound change. Different head combos have always gotten more attention from me.
 

BigDinSD

Gold Member
Hey Mike,

What batter and reso heads were you using?
 

BigDinSD

Gold Member
I too put a die cast on the snare side of my Copeland, although I dig the uniformity.. I haven't noticed any significant sound change. Different head combos have always gotten more attention from me.
I hear you man. Also in the mix is choosing between the ST Dry, G Plus or G14 drumhead. Can't get a comparison amongst those yet besides the Evans website. And their HD Dry snare head sounds nothing like mine.
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
I think the difference is nominal other than for rim shots -- in which case I find die cast to sound clunkier. On the bottom, I can't imagine it making any difference, but if that's what you want...why not?
 
I hear you man. Also in the mix is choosing between the ST Dry, G Plus or G14 drumhead. Can't get a comparison amongst those yet besides the Evans website. And their HD Dry snare head sounds nothing like mine.
I personally go for a single ply or single & dot head, get some ring but it's more controlled because of the die cast. I use a double ply on my wood drum with wood hoops, to get a dryer sound. The copeland is all bright, love em both!
 

tard

Gold Member
Both batter and snare side?
Yep, both sides and kept the same heads and no noticeable difference worth mentioning, I found more of a difference in sound when changing between clear and power dot and clear and coated heads than I did between the triple flanged and cast.
 
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