Joey Jordison named best drummer of past 25 years

Liam _Pearldrummer

Junior Member
This is a joke , what posessed them to my joey "the best" I admire his drumming but there are so many better drummers than him e.g. Chad Smith Would be my number 1 choice or someone like Dennis Chambers.
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
Jordison's selection as the best drummer in the last twenty-five years was based on the following:
  • The usage of the word 'best' in the poll title. If the word had been 'popular', people who incorrectly avoid the concept wouldn't have voted and the truly popular drummer might not have been chosen.


  • I'm intrigued by this one, but can you clarify? I don't quite get it.

    It seems glaringly obvious that such an unjust result could only be the result of his popularity, not that he's 'the best'.

    I was tempted to report this outrage to the Press Complaints Commission. Rhythm magazine has turned into a horrible rag and should prohibited from sale to children.
 
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nhzoso

Guest
I agree, congrats to him.. I have heard some of his stuff and while the music is not my taste I am always impressed by the drumming. I don't know why some people say speed is not talent? Of course it is.. anyone can learn to play fast just like anyone can learn to play a Gadd beat or Purdie shuffle or a Jo Jo Mayer 12/9 half beat quadruple ostinato .. but to write it in a new song where it fits like a glove, and play it in time with spot on feeling requires talent.

stop the hating geez life is too short!
 

Average

Senior Member
Congrats to Joey on his award.

The thread was an interesting read. I especially liked the discussion of drumline/corps drumming and how it relates to drumset playing.

In the US, I think it would be difficult to find a drummer who played in his/her school system who didn't have at least some experience with drumlines, orchestral playing and jazz. It would be almost impossible, I think, to find a drummer with college level training who wasn't familiar with those genres. It is no surprise that Joey has drumline experience. If I remember right, he grew up in Des Moines and all of the schools there, both public and private, take great pride in their marching bands now and did when he was going through school.

It was particularly interesting to read about Carlock's experience of having to unlearn the drumline style when he was under the tutelage of Soph. I started with Soph right when I was in the thick of the drumline experience and what I was doing was all wrong. Soph, at least back then, was big into ergonomic drumming with natural movement and form. One of these times I'll have to dig out some of my lesson materials from him. He teaches a very different style from the drumline types.
 
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wy yung

Guest
I do not think these polls should be taken seriously. The fact is that high profile players are featured because the average voter wouldn't know a Vinnie Colaiuta if he or she fell over him.

Jordison plays a basic form of drumming in a very basic musical enviroment. Complex subdivisions are not required. Simple 8th 16th and 32nd notes played in unison is all that is required. Single stroke rolls with both hands and feet appear to be his strengths. This is fine for what he does. And he does it very well

Heavy metal drumming is what it is. Unsophisticated to the trained ear, yes. But this does not detract from the fact that to perform it at the highest level takes commitment and dedication.

Is Joey the best drummer in the past 25 years? Obviously not. The notion is a joke. Bill Stewart and others like him will never be widely known. But let's let the non drummers feel as they do. Or even the ignorant drummers who have not studied properly and know exactly what really has been going on in drumming. Those who know don't care. Ignorance is bliss. So let's leave them to it.
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
It's difficult for me to see a thread like this.

On one hand, I'm a fan of Slipknot. I like some of the music they make, and I can't say Jordison sucks at what he does. Actually, he does what he does quite well. But that certainly doesn't make him a god.

On the other, as a drummer, I know that there are thousands upon thousands of 'better' players out there, and that I should feel some sort of indignancy at this polling result because it's an "artistic injustice".

So really, here's my take, which is parroting everything that's already been said:

Jordison's selection as the best drummer in the last twenty-five years was based on the following:
  • The usage of the word 'best' in the poll title. If the word had been 'popular', people who incorrectly avoid the concept wouldn't have voted and the truly popular drummer might not have been chosen.
  • Only a painter looks at a painting and considers its flaws scientifically. Drummers who just play drums don't care about the nuances of finer points in drumming, or even the 'spiritual' aspect to music. They want to hear something fast, loud, and hard, because it accurately portrays the energy they have.
  • Slipknot is arguably one of the most mainstream metal bands out there by now. This is practically the same as popularity, but it means that every single plug they have is going to be that much more influential than, say, every plug Neil Peart has.
  • And for you Jazz drummers out there, see bullet #2

And those of you who hate him, please stop. It's irritating.
 

Ferret

Senior Member
Lars comes down to one of two sides:

If you were a teenager in the 80's, Lars was awesome, because he was playing stuff no one else really was doing AT THE TIME, in a style of music few others were doing AT THE TIME, at least that you might actually come across (obscure bands aside).

If you discovered him later, Lars blows because 100,001 guys learned all of Lar's chops, and took them to a new level with 100,001 other bands, meanwhile, Lars decided to distance himself from all his drumming acrobatics, and started making really middle of the road (and boring) music.

Most of the 100,001 metal guys who "blow" Lars away, wouldn't be who they are if it was for Lars to originally inspire them.

But it's hard to get someone to sit down and listen to "And Justice for All" now and pretend the last 20 years of music didn't exist to see what was going on with that record. And it doesn't help that, for a long time, Metallica themselves rarely play anything off that album outside of "One".

As a young guy who did all the backreading into all of the scenes in extreme metal, I don't understand the hype around lars or metallica past the justice album. Maybe it was totally different to see him do it live when he was 25... I wasn't there.

But it's hard not to compare him to other thrash drummers that came out at the same time that pitched a harder game, and then went on to go innovate in other scenes when thrash ran its course. Dave Lombardo has done amazing things with fantomas and apocalyptica that pushed the drumming line forward 25 years after the thrash metal genre he helped pioneer.

Meshuggah (started mid-late 80s as well) was the band that really kicked the whole tech metal thing off, and has carried the torch for it right up to the whole djent thing thats going on with the latest generation of metal.

I don't mean to sound disrespectful to Lars or the music he made, but I am confused by the displacement of recognition for the other drummers of that era.
 
I personally find that poll to be a Hard Rock and Metal popularity contest rather than an actual 'best' drummer competition Though, Dave Grohl has to be one of my favourite drummers ever. Many names were missed on this such as
  • Danny Carey
  • Steve Gadd
  • Taylor Hawkins
  • Peter Erskine

Sure,I do like Metal & Rock. But when it comes to drumming... Jazz is the way to go for best drummers. None of your Joey Jordison double bass spam (lol)

Chris
 

Drums&Beer

Senior Member
The poll was mislabeled and is actually for the best "masked" drummer in the past 25 years.

1. Joey
2. Jizmak Da Gusha
3. Peter Criss

I actually like Jizmak better.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
The problem with that, though (in my opinion, of course), is that what makes Lars great isn't technical acrobatics that other folks can't do. That's not what makes ANY drummer great. What makes Lars great is (1) his feel--the way he grooves, (2) what he chooses to play, which includes some fairly unusual though sometimes simple things--and what he leaves out is just as important there.

Lars is a drummer who approaches his job as composition. He's writing parts that are integral to the songs, just like you might write a guitar riff. Riffs aren't better just because they're faster or technically harder to play. They're better because of what you choose to play, your creativity, and your feel.
Valid point, and very true.

But there was technical ability in there too.

Like in "Blackend" when the guitars go to 7/4, and Lars plays a two bar phrase, going over the bar line, then a quick syncopated snare fill, and he's back on the one.
Sure, prog bands did that all the time, but for the most part, that was unheard of in metal.

And where as most double bass drummers were playing rolls, or "duga duga duga", Lars started breaking up figures, and he'd play a 16th note triplet figure on his bass drums, but leave the 1st note out, all sorts of things to make his double bass really syncopated.

The whole "And Justice for All" album was filled with bars of 5, 7 and such mixed into the 4/4 thrash, which took a certain level of skill to pull off. I remember seeing them on that tour, and watching the sea of kids headbanging in time, then Metallica would hit a bar of 5 or 7, and everyone's heads would go out of time. Lars made it all sound so smooth and effortless.

And the first time "One" came on MTV, geez. I had never heard anyone play like that before. It inspired me to take double bass much more seriously than just that left foot thing you hit once in a while. Of course, maybe other people were doing it, but they weren't in public view the way Metallica was.

Flash forward a few years, and Metallica abandons that style of music, meanwhile, Vinnie Paul comes along with Pantera and his new way of syncopating double bass, and Scott Travis goes from underground sensation to being on MTV with "Pain Killer" and his crazy shifting from 16ths to 16th note triplets smoothly, and all these other players came to be known over the next few years. Then MTV brings back "head bangers ball" and all these extreme metal guys are playing rhythms on their bass drums no one even thought of in the 80s, and kids look at that and think "Lars who?, what was the big deal? He can't do that..." without putting it in any historical perspective.

Not to mention, 20 years ago, we didn't have youtube or myspace to hear what kind of crazy things drummers could be doing and compare guys like kids can do today.

As you said, Lars sold records. And people did buy them for his drumming, in the 80s.
Not so much after that.

But this same debate happens in all sort of music styles and instruments, where someone says "person B is better than person A" and yeah, but person B was inspired to become a better player by person A, so you can't just discount person A for not being the same level of player as person B.

And of course, none of this has anything to do with Joey winning this contest. LOL.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
No one can deny that Joey Jordison has skills. He has a resume to prove it. He plays metal more of the mainstream kind than the death metal kind but he can play his style very well.
Is he the greatest drummer of the last 25 years? No! Who is? (insert popular drummer name here), no they are not either because of so many different style, tastes, age groups etc. No one can really judge those things. Its just an award kind of like the emmy/grammy whatever. it mean nothing in the real world to listener & players alike.

I think we can agree that the title of greatest of 25 years is unreasonable but stop acting like the guy can't play b/c some d-bag on you tube can blast at 250 bpm or another drummer has a better dvd or resume. Its retarded. I have stated that I like Slipknot's first 3 albums & even I don't think he is the greatest but I am not offended that some kids reading a magazine voted for him. But who is? Some people in this thread act like Joey Jordison raped their mother & Indiana Jones at the same time.
These are very good points. I would have to say the "best" drummer, to the extent such a title is possible, would likely be a studio drummer, not a touring band drummer. Top-notch studio drummers have huge resumes with hundreds of well-known artists and must have some mastery of many different grooves, genres and styles. They may not be well known, but they definitely have the talent and have reached many more people through their playing than touring band musicians.
 

theindian

Senior Member
By the way, their have been some great disses from both sides of the argument in this thread. An interesting read anyday. Crazy 8's takes the cake though, what an epic burn!
 

BrewBillfold

Silver Member
Maybe, but I know for a fact that a whole ton of drummers sure did..myself included.
Yeah, definitely. I was teaching a lot in the latter half of the 80s, and a very large percentage of my students who were into hard rock or metal were Metallica fans and wanted to study Lars' grooves.
 

theindian

Senior Member
No one can deny that Joey Jordison has skills. He has a resume to prove it. He plays metal more of the mainstream kind than the death metal kind but he can play his style very well.
Is he the greatest drummer of the last 25 years? No! Who is? (insert popular drummer name here), no they are not either because of so many different style, tastes, age groups etc. No one can really judge those things. Its just an award kind of like the emmy/grammy whatever. it mean nothing in the real world to listener & players alike.

I think we can agree that the title of greatest of 25 years is unreasonable but stop acting like the guy can't play b/c some d-bag on you tube can blast at 250 bpm or another drummer has a better dvd or resume. Its retarded. I have stated that I like Slipknot's first 3 albums & even I don't think he is the greatest but I am not offended that some kids reading a magazine voted for him. But who is? Some people in this thread act like Joey Jordison raped their mother & Indiana Jones at the same time.
 

BrewBillfold

Silver Member
Lars comes down to one of two sides:

If you were a teenager in the 80's, Lars was awesome, because he was playing stuff no one else really was doing AT THE TIME, in a style of music few others were doing AT THE TIME, at least that you might actually come across (obscure bands aside).

If you discovered him later, Lars blows because 100,001 guys learned all of Lar's chops, and took them to a new level with 100,001 other bands, meanwhile, Lars decided to distance himself from all his drumming acrobatics, and started making really middle of the road (and boring) music.

Most of the 100,001 metal guys who "blow" Lars away, wouldn't be who they are if it was for Lars to originally inspire them.

But it's hard to get someone to sit down and listen to "And Justice for All" now and pretend the last 20 years of music didn't exist to see what was going on with that record. And it doesn't help that, for a long time, Metallica themselves rarely play anything off that album outside of "One".
The problem with that, though (in my opinion, of course), is that what makes Lars great isn't technical acrobatics that other folks can't do. That's not what makes ANY drummer great. What makes Lars great is (1) his feel--the way he grooves, (2) what he chooses to play, which includes some fairly unusual though sometimes simple things--and what he leaves out is just as important there.

Lars is a drummer who approaches his job as composition. He's writing parts that are integral to the songs, just like you might write a guitar riff. Riffs aren't better just because they're faster or technically harder to play. They're better because of what you choose to play, your creativity, and your feel.
 
C

Crazy8s

Guest
Lars comes down to one of two sides:

If you were a teenager in the 80's, Lars was awesome, because he was playing stuff no one else really was doing AT THE TIME, in a style of music few others were doing AT THE TIME, at least that you might actually come across (obscure bands aside).

If you discovered him later, Lars blows because 100,001 guys learned all of Lar's chops, and took them to a new level with 100,001 other bands, meanwhile, Lars decided to distance himself from all his drumming acrobatics, and started making really middle of the road (and boring) music.

Most of the 100,001 metal guys who "blow" Lars away, wouldn't be who they are if it was for Lars to originally inspire them.

But it's hard to get someone to sit down and listen to "And Justice for All" now and pretend the last 20 years of music didn't exist to see what was going on with that record. And it doesn't help that, for a long time, Metallica themselves rarely play anything off that album outside of "One".
Exactly DED. The same way everybody here can play all of the Beatles songs with ease, but it was Ringo (or Bernard Purdie as Purdie would say), who made it all happen.

Lars and Ringo inspired throngs of drummers to play and I can never find fault in those who inspire others to pick up an instrument.
 
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Crazy8s

Guest
Just mentioning that most album buyers probably didn't buy a Metallica album because of some spectacular drumming...
Maybe, but I know for a fact that a whole ton of drummers sure did..myself included. while Metallica had a few 'flops' no educated metal or hard rock musician can deny their enormous influence on metal and hard rock music, and metal is a significant part of modern music now because of Metallica and a handful of other groups.

A whole shizz-ton of drumkits were bought because of Lars, and because of Metallica, a whole lot of young cats got into music which is a wonderful thing in my book.

Ringo and Lars seem to now be in somewhat of the same category, and it would appear that some people 'get it' while others don't. Metallica has duked it out for 25 years now and they still have a legion of fans. If they 'sucked' they would not be filling amphitheaters...but there they are...rocking the roofs off the places...and here we are just talking about it.

I'd sell my soul to the devil to replace Lars in Metallica, but he already did that so I can't. 99.44% of the cats at this forum would too.
 
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