Jazz

mikel

Platinum Member
Just my opinion but a good jazz drummer displays far more interpretive taste than say a good rock drummer. I wanted to say that a good jazz drummer is "tastier" than a good rock drummer but oh the sick jokes some of you would make. ;)
Nah, just a different way of interpreting a different music. I would guess you are a Jazz drummer.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
I'd forgotten about this.

Brilliant.
In't it? I've watched them over and over and over....funniest sketches for me I've ever seen. I just love it. And Jazz really deserves it. It's so far up it's own Jacksy it needs a ringpull and a close friend to pull itself out (sorry Jazzsters....but it's true). I say all this despite liking Jazz :)

I went to Essex three or four years ago for the first time ever and I was sat on the tube heading into London from Epping. The train stopped at....Theydon Bois station ("Theydon Bois on guitar"). A bunch of people on the tube had absolutely no idea why I was in absolutely fits of laughter for no apparent reason.

Anyway...some kind soul spliced all 30 minutes of sketches...knock yourself out....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqZl9czGStQ
 

Skyking

Senior Member
Nah, just a different way of interpreting a different music. I would guess you are a Jazz drummer.
Nope not a jazz drummer. (I love Rock and Roll...) I've tried to like jazz but I just can't. However the jazz drummers I've seen on this forum blow me away. Fact is I'm jealous. Yeah, I think jazz is much harder to listen to, to understand and then to play.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
Louis Balfour is a kooolll katttt.
John Thompson (Louis Balfour) is a Manchester boy and used to live in apartments 30 yards from the offices I work at.

One evening, many years ago, me and my work colleagues all walked out of the bar in which we were drinking (underneath our offices), and crossed the road. Crossing the opposite way was old Louis. He was clearly in a hurry. A couple of the lads and I shouted "cool", "radical", "ground breaking" and all that stuff.

He sort of ignored us....then as he reached the other side of the road he stopped, turned, and said "CRAZY.....But NICE". Then carried on walking.

We all, and everyone around us, all cracked up in stitches of laughter. Then all started chanting (we were very drunk) "Louis, Louis, Louis".

It was a great moment. And we've loved the bloke ever since for his sense of humour and for giving us 10 seconds from his busy day :)

Same friends/colleagues will on occasion be out, and one of us will still ask "remember Louis Balfour....how funny was that?"
 

mikel

Platinum Member
John Thompson (Louis Balfour) is a Manchester boy and used to live in apartments 30 yards from the offices I work at.

One evening, many years ago, me and my work colleagues all walked out of the bar in which we were drinking (underneath our offices), and crossed the road. Crossing the opposite way was old Louis. He was clearly in a hurry. A couple of the lads and I shouted "cool", "radical", "ground breaking" and all that stuff.

He sort of ignored us....then as he reached the other side of the road he stopped, turned, and said "CRAZY.....But NICE". Then carried on walking.

We all, and everyone around us, all cracked up in stitches of laughter. Then all started chanting (we were very drunk) "Louis, Louis, Louis".

It was a great moment. And we've loved the bloke ever since for his sense of humour and for giving us 10 seconds from his busy day :)

Same friends/colleagues will on occasion be out, and one of us will still ask "remember Louis Balfour....how funny was that?"
Not surprised, the poor man was probably embarased. You were how old?
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Nope not a jazz drummer. (I love Rock and Roll...) I've tried to like jazz but I just can't. However the jazz drummers I've seen on this forum blow me away. Fact is I'm jealous. Yeah, I think jazz is much harder to listen to, to understand and then to play.
You clearly dont like the music, so why would you want to play it? Not a pop just an honest question. I play the music I love and play it better, I think, for that reason. I play some Jazz Funk, not cos its a certain genre but because I like the songs we do that just happen to be that style.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Hello everyone :) i just want to ask your opinion on this. I read somewhere in the internet that jazz is probably the hardest genre to learn and learning it can really pump up your playing regardless of the genre you want to play. Is this true? your thoughts? :)
As has been said repeatedly, I don't know about relative difficulty. I think a lot of that is - as has also been said - familiarity. If you grew up (as I did) surrounded by jazz then the language will be more familiar to you. Kids in India who grow up surrounded by tabla playing and konokol find that whole thing easier than I ever will.

As for "pump(ing) up your playing", I don't know. I've listened to, studied and played a fair amount of jazz and I probably couldn't play you a convincing Blast Beat or do anything with a double BD pedal that would keep the attention of most average metal fans for more than a second or two.

But, what you will get from starting near the beginning of jazz and working your way forward is a sense of the history of the drum set vocabulary and of American popular music in general. Many of the rhythms used in those early dance styles are still the basis of popular music today. The basic cadence of BD/SD/BD/SD is a holdover from marching music, but the specific ways in which jazz musicians began to syncopate around that skeleton form the basis of much of what we're still saying on the drumset. For example, we're still playing The Charleston in one form or another all the time. Learning to hear that will open up many doors and make sense of a lot of things. Then, studying the various ways in which jazz musicians improvised on and around that rhythm (and others) will provide inspiration for your own creativity - even in wildly different genres - if you want it to.

The greatest effect that listening to and learning to play jazz will have on any player is rhythmic. The syncopation and phrasing that jazz traditionally was based on, once digested, can be applied to any subsequent genre of popular music. Once you understand it, you'll see how it can be used to create tension and release in your playing that will keep your listeners' ears interested and their toes tapping.
 
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Roadydad

Senior Member
I'll give my newb perspective.

The more we learn, the more rounded people we become. It applies to music and everything else in life.
I purchased the Jazz Cookbook, ( a beginner jazz book ) hoping to learn swing. I don't care for jazz music itself, but I find the drum parts interesting on the ear. It took me awhile, but I'm slowly starting to get a feel for it.
I find it soothing and relaxing to play, and it makes me work on dynamics and independence.
To the OP, my take is it will improve your general playing,
 

Skyking

Senior Member
You clearly dont like the music, so why would you want to play it? Not a pop just an honest question. I play the music I love and play it better, I think, for that reason. I play some Jazz Funk, not cos its a certain genre but because I like the songs we do that just happen to be that style.
Simple answer... I don't want to play it, but I respect the drummers that do. It's like opera, 5 minutes of listening and I'm looking for the door. Although I don't like the music, I highly respect the voice of the performer. So, +1 on what Roadydad said.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Simple answer... I don't want to play it, but I respect the drummers that do. It's like opera, 5 minutes of listening and I'm looking for the door. Although I don't like the music, I highly respect the voice of the performer. So, +1 on what Roadydad said.
Apologies, I took your post to mean you either played or wanted to play Jazz. My mistake.

And yea, I respect all drummers, they all bring something to the party, regardless of percieved ability or genre we can learn something from almost anyone.
 
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