Jazz Solo Help

littledrummerboy98

Junior Member
Does anyone have any ideas that would help me on my jazz solo? I am kind of stuck because during practice I played the same solo a couple times and it did not sound that great. I am mostly a rock drummer so this jazz solo stuff is all new to me. I need help, the show is soon and I cant think of anything new to do for my solo. I need ideas.
 

jazzin'

Silver Member
Does anyone have any ideas that would help me on my jazz solo? I am kind of stuck because during practice I played the same solo a couple times and it did not sound that great. I am mostly a rock drummer so this jazz solo stuff is all new to me. I need help, the show is soon and I cant think of anything new to do for my solo. I need ideas.
How well do you know the melody of the tune? If you can't sing it, learn that first and then play along with the melody, embellishing it. You don't need to pull licks out like you do in a rock setting. It's better to play a simple solo that fits the tune and follows the form so everyone knows where you are.

Play the rhythm of the melody first and then start adding extra parts to it from there. Break it up between the bass and snare but play it so everyone will know where you are. If it's a free solo, develop one idea as much as possible. It's quite a difficult question without knowing which tune you are doing or what type of solo.

If you get really stuck and are worried ask to trade fours instead. That might be more manageable rather than jumping into a full chorus solo and having to worry about form and melody etc.

One point though: Learn the main rhythm of the main melody line or the most recognisable line of the tune and try to replicate it. This is always a good place to start and build a solo from.
 

littledrummerboy98

Junior Member
How well do you know the melody of the tune? If you can't sing it, learn that first and then play along with the melody, embellishing it. You don't need to pull licks out like you do in a rock setting. It's better to play a simple solo that fits the tune and follows the form so everyone knows where you are.

Play the rhythm of the melody first and then start adding extra parts to it from there. Break it up between the bass and snare but play it so everyone will know where you are. If it's a free solo, develop one idea as much as possible. It's quite a difficult question without knowing which tune you are doing or what type of solo.

If you get really stuck and are worried ask to trade fours instead. That might be more manageable rather than jumping into a full chorus solo and having to worry about form and melody etc.

One point though: Learn the main rhythm of the main melody line or the most recognisable line of the tune and try to replicate it. This is always a good place to start and build a solo from.
Thanks for all your help!
 

zap98

Member
Sing your solo. e.g. Listen to Steve Gadds phrasings. Mainly in the groove fore than exclamatory. He is an allround drummer but not strictly a 'jazz' drummer.

Start simple and build. Don't think to heavy on your technique e.g. i am going to play doubles here, a paradiddle and then invert it. You should spend time working out what the techniques sound like and try mixing them up. Practicing and drilling. You might come out with a phrase 'sing it'; then translate it to your drumset; voicings.

A solo might have troughs and peaks, build ups and bring downs in the solo. That might be how control your energy+activity. Your spirit.
 

deltdrum

Senior Member
I've been warming up lately to the ABC's in my head. Just swing them, sing it, and then solo over it. Learned it from a teacher at school and it's been really helpful.
 

Sondy Pasteurisen

Junior Member
Have a strong sense of the pulse and make sure you are comfortable with that and know where the one is - always. Then let your technique sing. For me it's technique plus knowledge through listening - you've got to love it and get inside it, the history of the genre is so important. But most of all sing inside, stay light, and don't sweat it. If you do that and don't get hung up on comparing negatively and self doubt then you'll start to enjoy your journey up the mountain path.
 

skreg

Senior Member
You need to listen to lots and lots and lots of jazz. The phrasing is very, very different from rock and it's going to take time for the style to sink into your brain.

I also recommend any of Peter Erskine's books - they have ideas on soloing.

Check out Ian Froman's lesson series:

http://www.vicfirth.com/education/drumset/froman.php

-sheldon
 
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