It's no longer just music

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Growing up, I'm 67, when listening to music, all three genres, I pretty much heard a song, and if it had a decent beat, would probably dance to it.
I never paid attention to drummers, guitar players, or even singers. Just the music as a whole.

Then along came the British Invasion. Beatles, Rolling Stones, and others and then there were drummers. At the same time I had begun taking drumming lessons at school and eventually ended up the school band and orchestra. Now I'm reading drum sheets and listening to other parts as they were separated by the instructor and rehearsed. And then I am listening to most music a little differently.

Now 40 years later I find a drum forum where everything drumming, drummers, and music is discussed, and yet again, my music education, has begun again. I am now learning much more than ever about drumming, drums, recording, drummers.

I never paid much attention to band members names, drummers names.
I had no clue that so many musicians jumped about from band to band, that drummers in bands were replaced for recording sessions, and that albums, had more than one set of musicians, even on the same album.

Where else would one go for such an education? Recording techniques, drum muffling, etc etc etc., all seems so difficult and yet makes so much sense. Am I the only one here with such experience? Am I the naive one here? Would love to hear how your music experience has changed since joining the forum.....
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Before the forum, my approach to gear was very nominal and for me, drumming was all about the music. I was mostly obsessing on new guitars in the catalogs like Sweetwater, etc. I played drums every chance I got, but I never thought about my gear or changing heads. I knew what a good cymbal sounded like, so I naturally gravitated toward AAX sounds. They were pro and more wallet friendly than Zildjians, besides, Bill Ward plays Sabian, right?

I didn't read drummer mags or seek out drumming pages or videos on the internet either. I was really into guitars too, so most of my attention went that way. Then one day I got my guitar. It was a Gibson Les Paul Jr. in TV Yellow. I still like it. It sits right there in the corner of my room, hardly ever touched anymore. After I joined the forum here, I realized how much more I enjoyed playing the drums than guitar. I've never did a gig as a guitarist, only as a drummer because I am a lot better on drums than guitar. It just turned out that way. I can serve the music better as a drummer.

It used to be all about the music, but now I think about gear and all things drumming all the time. It consumes me.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Before the forum, I used to have an hour per day to do other things.
It's all good though. Knowledge is good.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
OMG before the forum and after the forum are like BC and AD to me.

I had no place to indulge my millions of questions. I kept it in, all of it. I had no interest in boring non drummers with my thoughts. The floodgates burst when I found this place and has been flowing ever since. My drumming has improved by simply reading what goes on here.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I was the opposite.

I read Modern Drummer religiously, and used to buy up back issues. As well as any other drummer magazine I could get a hold of.

I got a job part time in a drum shop when I was in High School, where I got to hear all sorts of stories, and got to meet several drummers who would later on become name players. As well as the name players who would come through for clinics, autograph signings, and such.

In college, I took a history of Jazz class and a history of Rock class so I learned all the major names in each genre.

And then I went to PIT where I met name players, players would become name players many years later, and heard all sorts of inside scopes about the music business.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
Computers have improved my life is so many ways. I’m learning a lot and quickly. Drumming is just a part of it.
 

Drumlove65

Senior Member
For me it all started on a vinyl 45; side A was BTO's Takin Care Of Business and side B was Let It Ride. I immediately heard Robbie Bachman's drum sound. Then I bought their LP Not Fragile; bought Deep Purple's Fireball and I was hooked on all things percussion. Through two marriages, a teaching career, forced retirement I AM CONSUMED with the ambition to play drums and thank heaven for this website.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
Would love to hear how your music experience has changed since joining the forum.....
The information age has opened up everything, not just music/drumming.

Not a week goes by without me being astounded at computers/internet, something we take for granted these days.

I've been an internet forum fan for decades because it generally puts me in touch with real people sharing their views, thoughts and experiences with no aganda other than to talk about what they enjoy. I give it more credence than media which is funded by advertisers. First hand knowledge is king.

I've learned a ton here and have met some good and interesting people.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I have to agree with everyone else's great posts. DW is like an encyclopedia of info a cornucopia of everything drums, drumming, drummers. Great community on forum with helpful criticisms and help. You could put my drumming knowledge on the head of a pin-I worked up to the stamp :) I love the multi-cultural aspect too-all connected by drums. So many great drummers with great ideas to sample and try. Lots of support here too. One of the most civil social forums I've visited.
 

RIneuron

Senior Member
Agree with what everyone has said about the usefulness of the forum. In addition, what I noticed in Gruntarsdad's original post was how musicians listen to music differently from non=musicians---more analytical. You hear things others don't.
 

basset52

Senior Member
I came back to drumming after a 40 yr lay off about a year ago and discovered the DW forum at about the same time. On the upside it has provided me with an enormous amount of knowledge on drum gear to assist my purchases,tuning issues etc. Info onTechnique issues to improve my playing, a sense that my struggles are also someone elses somewhere in the world so it encourages me to play on despite my deficiencies. On the other side of that coin the DW forum unfortunately provides a vehicle for me to compare myself unfavourably with the ginormous amount of talent that is on display here. Whilst that is not a bad thing sometimes as it is driver for improvement it can be depressing at other times.Overall it has been a great learning tool for me across a whole range of areas to make me better musically.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Through the information age I've learned a lot, and I think it's great that beginning players get access to better information than when I was a kid.

But coming up in my time (70s-80s) I basically only heard what I liked and had to figure out how to do it to get that sound or that groove, or that fill. I had to do a lot of experimenting to get what I was after. Now you can actually get a demonstration from either the artist himself or someone else who knows more. As great as I think that is, sometimes I think it sprouts more clones than individuals, because everyone sees how it is done. So everyone does it the same. I remember learning how to play the beat from 50 ways to leave your lover and I discovered years later that although it sounded right, I was playing it completely different from Steve Gadd (left-handed notwithstanding).

Part of me likes the individuality that would've come about, but part of me thinks it's cool that you can get the hopefully correct way much quicker!

I still subscribe to the fact that you learn things much quicker if you learn how to do something, then immediately go out and PLAY IT LIVE IN FRONT OF PEOPLE!
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I've learnt a lot since joining the forum and discovered different bands/drummers I'd never have found.

It's great for advice. I have a one off steambent snare I'd never have dreamt of having.

It's nice to have people who have different opinions/approaches to drumming.

If I stopped learning new things about drumming, I'd stop playing!
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
Agree with you and others. Getting information in the past was so much more difficult. So many options to learn about gear, sound, and technique!
 

Mount Saint Elle'ns

Silver Member
Before joining the forum, I knew nothing about drumming. I didn't even know much about music, because music was only about movement for me, or something I listened to while driving. You know the people who always have earbuds in, and have massive music collections, and opinions on bands, and every genre and sub-genre? That wasn't me.

Also, I listened to a song as a whole. I would rarely notice the individual instruments (unless my ex was playing, who's a very talented flamenco/Spanish guitarist), and even now I struggle to isolate the different instruments. I find that the bass guitar gets in the way of hearing the drums clearly, and I am just starting to be able to pick up drum grooves and fills without seeing a video of it.

Another thing I didn't know was how much gear a drummer needs and how often they like to change their gear, or collect different kits. And it never occurred to me that cymbals could be so expensive, and make such a big difference.

There are loads of other things as well, but these are the things I am willing to admit for now. ;)
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
But coming up in my time (70s-80s) I basically only heard what I liked and had to figure out how to do it to get that sound or that groove, or that fill. I had to do a lot of experimenting to get what I was after. Now you can actually get a demonstration from either the artist himself or someone else who knows more. As great as I think that is, sometimes I think it sprouts more clones than individuals, because everyone sees how it is done. So everyone does it the same. I remember learning how to play the beat from 50 ways to leave your lover and I discovered years later that although it sounded right, I was playing it completely different from Steve Gadd (left-handed notwithstanding).

Part of me likes the individuality that would've come about, but part of me thinks it's cool that you can get the hopefully correct way much quicker!

I still subscribe to the fact that you learn things much quicker if you learn how to do something, then immediately go out and PLAY IT LIVE IN FRONT OF PEOPLE!
Yea Bo, I don't know which is better, to have less "tools" and learn to compensate with our wits, or to have all the stuff laid out nice and pretty for us. I just don't know.
 
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