Is losing weight such a big deal?

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
2 words... utility cart. I never take my kit anywhere without bringing my utility cart. I load all the cases onto the cart and wheel it in to where it needs to go. Takes 3 loads (including my road case) to get everything from A to B and it's easy on the back.

I use the folding Rubbermaid one that's about $100 at any Home Depot. Real good investment.
What do you do when you run into steps?
 

LukeSnyder

Gold Member
Thats one of the main reasons I like my carbon fiber drum set, it weighs nothing! I've never liked big heavy drums, I want something that I can move comfortably and easily.
 

space jeff

Junior Member
2 words... utility cart. I never take my kit anywhere without bringing my utility cart. I load all the cases onto the cart and wheel it in to where it needs to go. Takes 3 loads (including my road case) to get everything from A to B and it's easy on the back.

I use the folding Rubbermaid one that's about $100 at any Home Depot. Real good investment.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I think it's kind of wussy when people complain about a drums weight, it's not THAT heavy. Try carrying an 80 lb bundle of roofing shingles up a 20 foot ladder, those guys have something to complain about. Just a little perspective.
Larry, "wussy" isn't one of the words I'd choose ... I'd go for terms like "sensible", "logical" and "sane". In my experience it's very common for males to get those words mixed up before they reach adulthood :)
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
If I found a drum I love, I don't care what the weight. It's all about sound to me, then looks. Price and weight come last to me.

If I love drum A as much as drum B, but drum A weighs less, then I would consider it. But looks would trump weight. I think it's kind of wussy when people complain about a drums weight, it's not THAT heavy. Try carrying an 80 lb bundle of roofing shingles up a 20 foot ladder, those guys have something to complain about. Just a little perspective.
 

Brundlefly

Senior Member
I don't move my drums around much so sound is at the top end of my scale of importance while weight is near the bottom. That said, I have to admit that I'm surprised every time I pull my bass drum out for tuning and find that it weights about half what I expect. That bit always gets me and I (re-)realize that weight is an integrated part of the formula that makes my kit what it is. So, weight is probably more important to me than I usually think.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
On a more serious note, for my next kit (whenever that may be), weight WILL be something I will take into account.

I want my next kit to be super light for easy transport.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Losing weight is a good thing for your kit. You don't want it to develop adult-onset diabetes, which is an epidemic with American kits that are made from Sugar Maple...
Which is why it's recommended you play your maple kit at least 60 minutes per week, preferable daily.

It's a problem at my house; my Signia is getting fat and lazy because my DW has been getting more use lately. I need to switch it up more often.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
If it's worth it to me to play with *that sound*, I'll haul whatever I need to. Weight is further down on the list than sound and appearance to me.

--and--

Losing weight is a good thing for your kit. You don't want it to develop adult-onset diabetes, which is an epidemic with American kits that are made from Sugar Maple...
 
S

sticks4drums

Guest
I really think it depends on what you are doing with them. If they are going to sit in your basement, or set up at a venue all the time then it doesn't matter. If you have to haul them around all the time then it makes a huge difference.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Too Many Songs make a good point about Sonar.

Drummers may not choose a kit because it's lighter than others, but certainly a kit that is overly heavy than average will detract buyers.

A good example is bell brass style snare drums: Lots of people will talk about how great they sound, but very few of them get sold, because most people don't want to carry them.
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
If it sounds good, then I could care less what it weighs. However, I would find it slightly inconvenient to have to carry my drums everywhere if they did weigh over a certain poundage.

Just make sure you never ever use solid chrome for your hardware.
 

wsabol

Gold Member
Light weight lugs are second to the lug style. If I want Tube lugs, and one guy is making steel ones, and another guy, aluminum. I'm definitely going with the aluminum guy.

But if I want beavertail lugs.. I'm not going to sacrifice that for tube lugs I don't like, no matter the weight.
 
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Pollyanna

Platinum Member
It was my main consideration, along with mall footprint. Lugging kills me. The way I see it, every drum can sound great if you can hit it the way it wants to be hit.

Of course, there's "great" and there's "greater" but I have no great need for "greater" and I'm not really a "impressive" kind of drummer anyway - like a character actor doesn't need to be a beautiful as the leading lady - like Mick Jagger probably wouldn't have been much more effective as The Stones's vocalist if he had a better voice.

Anyway, that's my story and I'm sticking to it!

Having said that, for a pro like Boomka it's a different ball game. It's probably different on Adam's planet too :)
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
For me, weight would not really be on my priority list. Size would. If I can get the same exact sound from a 24" BD and a 20", then I will go with the 20" just for easier transporting.

I assume you're talking about ease of transporting rather than the sound differences it makes. If it's the latter then I have absolutely no idea what weight I like.
 

adam!

Senior Member
If you're trying to go for a lower weight drum, I recommend getting them on a diet and exercise plan that is burning more calories than they are taking in. Be sensitive to their feelings though.... It's a slow process...
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Please help me focus my production drum design guys & guyettes,

I fully subscribe to the sonic benefits of low total mass for a certain sound palate, although there's many that disagree with me, but how attractive is it to have light weight drums from a practical pov? Would an ultra light set feature high on your list of priorities, if so, why.
As a guy who swears and grimaces while toting around a set of Oak Customs (which I love to play) and misses the days of moving around a vintage mahogany Ludwig kit, it's something I'm always interested in. In the end, I'll go with sound every time, but if you can have both, then great.
 

Too Many Songs

Senior Member
Hi Andy

I think Sonor's experience in the 1980s is useful to reflect on here. Ever thought why their top of the range drums around that time were all labelled as 'lite'. I am told, by a reliable source, that this was because the Phonic range that preceeded these drums was recognised as being a wonderfully made and sounding range but really, really heavy. Sonor deliberately set out to change the perception of their drums with their marketing. That must tell you something.

For my part I have a Sonor Phonic and yes it is a hell of a weight to carry around. And as compared to my other kit (a Slingerland from the 1960s) there is a noticeable difference - a very noticeable difference. And if I am honest, sometimes I'll pick the Slingerland as my kit to play just because I can't be bothered to carry the Sonor. But at the same time there are occasions (those days when I've had three Wheatabix's) when it's the Sonor that gets taken out (all of it - 3 hanging toms and 2 floors plus bass drum) just because it is obviously the kit to play for that particular gig.

So yes weight matters and is something that Sonor recognised. But I think Sonor would say that drums that are excessively heavy are difficult to market not that drums that are lightweight are per se easier.

Have fun. Found a new rehearsal venue yet? '
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Please help me focus my production drum design guys & guyettes,

I fully subscribe to the sonic benefits of low total mass for a certain sound palate, although there's many that disagree with me, but how attractive is it to have light weight drums from a practical pov? Would an ultra light set feature high on your list of priorities, if so, why.
 
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