Is it acceptable to audition for multiple groups/bands?

pt3407

Senior Member
I’m currently in high school, in my 3rd year. I was thinking of auditioning for the jazz fm 91 big band but in case i don’t get accepted, maybe i could get accepted for other bands/groups. Is it considered rude or unacceptable to get accepted for a band and then decline, if you have the opportunity to join the one you were mainly hoping for?
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I would audition for both and feel grateful if you were selected for both. That would then be the decision, to pick the one you like best. Gigs are gard to come btt.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Note - you said both "in case I don’t get accepted" and "Is it considered rude or unacceptable to get accepted for a band and then decline..." Those are two different things.

I don't know if it's unacceptable, you can certainly do what you want. Rude? Probably. Uncool? Very.

Honestly, why would you audition for something you don't actually want? Auditioning is not a sport. It's not a chance to hone your skills. And, when you turn something down once you've been accepted, you will never get another audition with them. Word gets around... fast.

You wouldn't interview for a job that you don't actually want, would you?

Bermuda
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Sure it is acceptable. Not rude. Not uncool.

When I was putting a band together like 90% of the people coming over to audition were either already in other bands or were checking out several other bands and opportunities and I found out none of it until I made them offers. It seems a generally accepted practice for musicians.

And why not: when I'm looking for another "day" job I put my resume out to as many companies as possible and try to get as many interviews as possible. Same thing.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
And why not: when I'm looking for another "day" job I put my resume out to as many companies as possible and try to get as many interviews as possible. Same thing.
Absolutely line-up as many interviews as you can. But when someone calls back and says you've got the job, do you then turn it down?

Is that something new with today's younger workforce? When I was managing and hiring, and someone interviewed and I told them they got the job for which they came to me, I expected them to take it. If they didn't, I wouldn't have interviewed them again (however, they always took the job.)

Relationships are important, and conducting one's self in a professional manner at all times and in every dynamic, is important. The OP is young, and there's no better time to start on that path.

Bermuda
 

aaronmcd

Member
I don't have experience with bands (yet), but I disagree with Jon w/ regards to work. It is very common to interview, get an offer, and decline. The employee is interviewing the employer as well. If it doesn't seem like a good fit, if you get a bad vibe from the potential boss, if the money and/or benefits aren't up to par, if another company offered better - all reasons why the candidate might decline an offer. Just as a potential employer might decline a potential candidate after an interview. Is it rude to offer an interview and then decline to hire? No. So why would it be rude the other way around? As long as you don't string them along and make it seem like you are ready to accept and then flip flop.

Interviewing and applying for colleges and grad school is similar. I was accepted to both Stanford and Berkeley for my masters studies. I chose the one that offered funding, declined the other. I was in the minority in that I ONLY applied to 2 schools. Most people were applying to many colleges. So why should interviewing for a band be any different?
 

pt3407

Senior Member
I should clarify; I’m not saying that the other options other than auditioning for jazz fm 91 are ones that I don’t want to audition for. It’s just that jazz fm 91 is the one i would want to get the most.

What is the consensus? I just want to be sure so that I don’t come across as a jerk to other people.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
It is very common to interview, get an offer, and decline. The employee is interviewing the employer as well.
Of course. But I'm talking about interviewing/auditioning without the intention of following through. That's uncool and hurts the person's reputation.

Only go for the job/band you want or at least are willing to accept.

Bermuda
 

aaronmcd

Member
Of course. But I'm talking about interviewing/auditioning without the intention of following through. That's uncool and hurts the person's reputation.

Only go for the job/band you want or at least are willing to accept.

Bermuda
Well, yeah, but willing to accept under the right circumstances. One can go in knowing that they might not accept as long as they also might accept.
 

jdhardrummer

Senior Member
Yeah I disagree as well... *ESPECIALLY* with music. Unlike a lot of other professional careers, the job 'details' with a music gig are extremely vague ahead of time, and more importantly, can be solely dictated by the personalities at hand.

I want all my clients to be happy, and I don't take a job where I feel like they won't get their moneys worth. If I get to an audition and I just don't gel with them *at all* (i.e.: the dude is a complete dick), I will respectfully turn it down, because it's not worth the mental anguish and more importantly, they won't be happy with the result. This isn't something I would have had any way of knowing ahead of time, practically speaking.

So yeah... it's not rude to do, but as others have said, at least have a reasonable intent of following through if the variables line up.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Well, yeah, but willing to accept under the right circumstances. One can go in knowing that they might not accept as long as they also might accept.
What? Wasn't the audition where all the cards are laid out on the table? That's usually how it works in a job interview, no?

I agree that maybe things aren't said in an audition situation that you find out later, especially in music, but that's where clear communication skills need to be honed by both employer and employee. I'm assuming they were clear enough to attract your attention to want to audition. If you actually got the gig, then I would follow through with it.

That is, of course, if you don't want to appear uncool, and then have those people tell their friends, who in turn tell their friends, that they've met a guy who likes to audition, but turns them down if they want to hire him.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
What? Wasn't the audition where all the cards are laid out on the table? That's usually how it works in a job interview, no?

I agree that maybe things aren't said in an audition situation that you find out later, especially in music, but that's where clear communication skills need to be honed by both employer and employee. I'm assuming they were clear enough to attract your attention to want to audition. If you actually got the gig, then I would follow through with it.
Exactly. Bo gets it.

Let me explain my perspective and experiences, and not from my primary, fairly high-profile gig. I've been in several bands in the last 40+ years. All were hopeful groups and artists trying to get noticed and further their career, which I believe is what most musicians want. I'm still a full member in a few fairly long term bands, 7, 13 and 37 years respectively (and that's not including the Al gig.)

I don't think I've formally auditioned for a band in probably 35 years. But I've been involved in the process with these bands where auditions are occasionally held for other players. Without fail, someone who auditions, wins the audition, and then bails, never gets called back again for the group. I personally write them off as well when asked if I can recommend someone.

Are there reasons that someone joins a band and leaves later? Of course. Everyone should want to grow and move forward, and that often involves moving to another group, or even going solo. But winning an audition is a commitment, and that's important. There's no reason to do an audition for a group that you don't want to work with.

Bermuda
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I should clarify; I’m not saying that the other options other than auditioning for jazz fm 91 are ones that I don’t want to audition for. It’s just that jazz fm 91 is the one i would want to get the most.
Then audition for that one first. If it doesn't work out, go to the secondary band.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
I am 62 and an executive. Any coaching on job hunting encourages you to send as many resumes out as possible and work work work for interviews. That's your "job" when job hunting. It's your livelihood and means of support you're impacting. Doing one interview and then waiting weeks or months for a response is ridiculous.

As an employer, respond quickly (within a week) and make a reasonable offer in order to avoid candidate turning you down. Typically in today's world the hiring process for a large company is long and protracted.


Absolutely line-up as many interviews as you can. But when someone calls back and says you've got the job, do you then turn it down?

Is that something new with today's younger workforce? When I was managing and hiring, and someone interviewed and I told them they got the job for which they came to me, I expected them to take it. If they didn't, I wouldn't have interviewed them again (however, they always took the job.)

Relationships are important, and conducting one's self in a professional manner at all times and in every dynamic, is important. The OP is young, and there's no better time to start on that path.

Bermuda
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Eh, it's fine. You're what, 17? Audition for whomever you'd like. You may find that you like the band more after you get to know who's in charge of it, or, you may learn that the band is headed in a new direction, etc. Big bands are increasingly rare these days, and they're great experience for reading charts and meeting other players.

if you have the opportunity to join the one you were mainly hoping for?
You're opinion about the bands could change. Right now you'd prefer the big band, but you don't really know enough about the other groups to make an informed decision, right? So go do the auditions. It's fine. They're (presumably) auditioning many drummers, so you are free to audition many bands. Be honest and open; it's okay to make it known that you are auditioning with more than one group. If a bandleader is disappointed by this, that's their issue, not yours.

Auditioning is not a sport. It's not a chance to hone your skills.
For a young musician, there is a lot to be learned by going through the audition process. Being personable, and playing well, while under pressure, should be practiced.
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
As a division manager I am very involved in the interviewing and hiring process. The people we bring in are usually recent engineering school graduates, most of whom have interned with us or one of our sister organizations. Even in this environment, where candidates have interned with us for months, we understand that many of them will not accept our offer. We even have specific questions we ask candidates who take employment elsewhere. Its part of the deal, talented people have options, and we want talented people to work for us.

When I moved to Connecticut I tried out for 4 different bands before I finally joined one. I would have been happy in any of the 4, but I was looking for the best fit. I believe only a desperate person jumps at the first opportunity that comes around. I will say it did not hurt my reputation, if anything it helped me make friends in the local scene. There is no animosity, no hurt-feelings, and nothing is taken personally. I respect them, and they respect me, and we meet at shows and have a beer.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
I think it's great that people will post a sample of their tunes online so that you can audition them , in a sense, before deciding to audition for them. That way nobody is wasting nobody's time.
 

ConcertTom

Senior Member
I would say it depends...
If I'm reading correctly, the big band is more an educational program which changes over each year, than a "band". Are the other bands you'd 've interested in along the same lines? If so, then it's just like auditioning for schools. You do as many auditions as you can and choose your best option from where you get accepted.

If the other bands are not, I have 2 lines of thinking:

If you know what these other bands are about and know the people and basically what you'd be getting into, I wouldn't audition for them unless you plan on accepting it. OR, as others have stated, just be VERY CLEAR UP FRONT that you're auditioning around and not sure who you'd want to go with. Most likely, this will be a turn off and they will tell you to never mind, but at least that would negate the possibility of any misunderstanding and nobody would waste anyone's time. And you never know, maybe they're fine with it.

If you're talking about answering Craigslist ads for auditions where something may peak your interest but the situation, level of the other musicians, and prospects for the future are vague, then I say go for it and not worry too much. I had a couple situations like this where I showed up for an audition and it was clear that I was going to spend too much time and frustration while they figured out how to do things like count 4 bars or figure out what key they were playing in, and I decided it just wasn't worth my time, despite their strong desire to have me there. I felt a little bad about it, but I was actually quite proud of myself for recognizing my value and the value of my time for once.
 
Top