Is infantilism killing classical music?

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I wish I could remember her name....it may well come back to me but I had a client who became a very good friend who was the lead singer (if that's the right terminology) in the Halle orchestra. She was definitely Soprano. She worked in Salford for a firm called Raab Karcher. We became really good friends then lost touch sadly. Many years ago, and I've a total memory block on it

Small world....I am desperately trying to remember her name as you might actually know her.
I doubt it, it was a few years ago! My ex probably did.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
"Infantilism of the generations growi ng up without wanting to experience classical music" ..hmmm :) just because it Has Been Decided that Classical Music is good for the masses does not mean there will never be (is already) modern music that is just as Good (whatever good may mean) as what a few 17th century Italians and Germans once wrote.

How many versions of Beethoven's 5th does one really need/need to subsidize?

I have nothing against Beethoven but he's not any better than, say, Prince on my planet. Or Nile Rodgers, let's make it more provokative :p

This is a bit of a thread hijack, sorry :)
Ummmm....."classical music" is a genre. There are modern classical music composers.

Also, there is more to classical music than just Beethoven's 5th, Night On Bald Mountain, and Jesu, Joy Of Man's Desiring. If you were to explore the entire catalog, even from just the 1700s, it would take you more than a lifetime. There is plenty of music out there, and while you might feel as though Haydn is the same as Vivaldi is the same as Brahms, then you can explore the sects of classical music, like chamber music, solos, concertos, percussion ensembles (a personal favorite), etc...

Yes, I see Beethoven as equal to, say, Prince or whomever--they're composers in their own right, and have widely-popular music. They're both on my iPod. I like them both. The "infantilism" I was speaking of was of the modern generation, and the apparent "stubborness" to not want to listen to various genres of music outside of modern pop. It would do everybody some good to listen to and appreciate a LOT of different music styles. I know some "classical guys" who listen to Katy Perry. In contrast, you don't often find the Carmina Burana or the Cello Suites on the average middle schooler's iPod...
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
Nicola rings a bell but like I say, my ex would know and I'm not really on speaking terms! She was Amelia.

Nevertheless, small World!
You're not wrong.

I'm not on speaking terms with my ex either so I empathise.

When I say not on speaking terms....I think she'd like to gut me with a rusty spoon
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
Ummmm....."classical music" is a genre. There are modern classical music composers.

Also, there is more to classical music than just Beethoven's 5th, Night On Bald Mountain, and Jesu, Joy Of Man's Desiring. If you were to explore the entire catalog, even from just the 1700s, it would take you more than a lifetime. There is plenty of music out there, and while you might feel as though Haydn is the same as Vivaldi is the same as Brahms, then you can explore the sects of classical music, like chamber music, solos, concertos, percussion ensembles (a personal favorite), etc...

Yes, I see Beethoven as equal to, say, Prince or whomever--they're composers in their own right, and have widely-popular music. They're both on my iPod. I like them both. The "infantilism" I was speaking of was of the modern generation, and the apparent "stubborness" to not want to listen to various genres of music outside of modern pop. It would do everybody some good to listen to and appreciate a LOT of different music styles. I know some "classical guys" who listen to Katy Perry. In contrast, you don't often find the Carmina Burana or the Cello Suites on the average middle schooler's iPod...
Now then....

I hate to labour my earlier point....

But my music teacher gave me a zero grade in one assignment because I'd written about John Lennon when asked to write an article outlining the life of one composer.

So....at least one music teacher would disagree with you labelling Prince as such

:)
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Now then....

I hate to labour my earlier point....

But my music teacher gave me a zero grade in one assignment because I'd written about John Lennon when asked to write an article outlining the life of one composer.

So....at least one music teacher would disagree with you labelling Prince as such

:)
Well, I happen to be a music teacher as well, so I guess my credentials match your music teacher's. :)

What was the assignment? "Pick a composer" or "pick a classical composer?" If your teacher didn't specify, then you have every right to contest the grade. Seriously...one of the definitions of the word "compose" is "to write or create a work of art, specifically music or poetry." A composer is a person who composes. If the teacher gave you a grade that stuck because of this, that's just wrong--they should have been more clear if they had a specific type of composer in mind.

Prince writes (composes) music. He is, therefore, a composer. Same with John Lennon.
 

picodon

Silver Member
Ummmm....."classical music" is a genre. There are modern classical music composers.

...

I know some "classical guys" who listen to Katy Perry. In contrast, you don't often find the Carmina Burana or the Cello Suites on the average middle schooler's iPod...
"Modern classical" sounds like a contradiction in terms to me, I presume you mean composers alive today that compose for classical instruments.

I hear what you're saying. It's jus that when you say stubborn, that reminds me much more my parents who were too stubborn to listen to even one piece of MY music when I was a kid, because it wasn't even to be called music, then my kids now who are open to anything I make them listen to, whether it's Beethoven, Jimi Hendrix, Queen or Lorde. Which does not mean they don't have their preferences.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
I'm not sure if I get it. I was classically trained (piano and trumpet) and I hardly remember learning those very basic songs but they are probably used so that you don't have to deal with the confusion of reading sharps and flats or complex rhythm.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
Well, I happen to be a music teacher as well, so I guess my credentials match your music teacher's. :)

What was the assignment? "Pick a composer" or "pick a classical composer?" If your teacher didn't specify, then you have every right to contest the grade. Seriously...one of the definitions of the word "compose" is "to write or create a work of art, specifically music or poetry." A composer is a person who composes. If the teacher gave you a grade that stuck because of this, that's just wrong--they should have been more clear if they had a specific type of composer in mind.

Prince writes (composes) music. He is, therefore, a composer. Same with John Lennon.
It was 'write about the life of a composer'.

To be fair, back then (things may be different) I think it was taken as read that what was meant was a classical composer so I knew at the time I was stretching things. I was always rebellious.

And no, it wasn't integral to my actual exam which I did well in. This was 25 years ago back in a time when you were judged based on your performance in a written exam and some practicals.

I actually quite liked music because a focus of it was of course my two chosen instruments, guitar and drums and at least our music room had a drum kit, which I was able to use until I reached about 13 and got my own.

I do remember my practical exam on guitar (my first chosen instrument) with a smile. I played Peggy Sue and thought it a good idea to sing. When I'd finished the examiner asked "can you do it without the singing". So I did. He said "that's better". It was a pretty damn funny moment.
 
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