interesting micing techniques

HeadRush

Senior Member
I'd like to know some ways all of you have miced your drums

one I've thought of is puting a single mic in the other room
another is just puting a mic inside a bass drum that you don't use, and that really makes the bass boom.
I've been wanting to experiment with other techniques that give me some nice natural effects and would maybe like some ideas

-Erik
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
One that I came across in the studio is to build an ambience tunnel extending from the front of the bass drum, where the mic is placed inside a metal bin laid sideways and blankets are laid over the space between the bin and the bass drum to form a tunnel, maybe 2-3 feet along. This is then coupled with the output from a mic placed in front of the batter side of the bass drum. Interesting DIY effect.
 

HeadRush

Senior Member
I've seen that before and it really interested me, but I'm more interested in using a single mic for the entire set.
 

Vipercussionist

Silver Member
I'd like to know some ways all of you have miced your drums

one I've thought of is puting a single mic in the other room
another is just puting a mic inside a bass drum that you don't use, and that really makes the bass boom.
I've been wanting to experiment with other techniques that give me some nice natural effects and would maybe like some ideas

-Erik
Those are some GREAT ideas!! In the studio, other than the MONEY you'll spend, it's all about cool sounds. Sometimes a radical idea will sound great, for reasons that don't really even make sense!! Other times it'll not make the grade, but if you went SAFE all the time, you'd just sound like everyone else.

I "produced" an album of a former band of mine some years ago, and one track just lacked the OOMPH of all the others as we rushed getting the initial sounds on that track. The performances were great, but they lacked a good tone and were very "flat and dead" sounding.

Well, I had an idea that came to me because a really cool old local venue had been closed and was being demolished and torn down, and it was a pretty sad thing. In my minds "ear" I reminisced of the room's ambiance as I had been in there many times. It was a BIG old theater style venue and until people were in there it had a haunting ambiance that really made things sound huge. And though I didn't have access to a REAL room to use for the ambiance I desired, it sparked an idea for this tune that for the most part was useless.

I used a really expensive processor and dialed in a REALLY HUGE room reverb, it really sounded as I remembered the venue, but with no one IN it. it was a different approach that made the tune usable as it really sounded as if we were in the venue, doing a soundcheck or something. We ended up being able to use the tune on the album, and we dedicated it to the memory of the now defunct venue.

If not for an "outside the box" idea, the tune would have just been scrapped.

EPILOGUE:
Outside the box = Good
 

XXLdrums

Junior Member
1 mic is not enough for me,
I ve just recorded a lot of stuff for my dvd and used 4
2 plain simple at 2020 as overheads and a kick (d112) and snare mic.. (sm57)works great.
I ve also done recording with just the 2 at's..for the price it works really well..
not to spam , but here you ll see and hear it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLw-mKqfyHQ&fmt=18

I wanted to try this after seeing this video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiFOD1EeKhQ also interesting for you maybe?
 

Rezn8

Member
There's so much you can try if you have time to experiment. A room can have many interesting sweet spots. When I first got a mic with switchable polar patterns, I had my girlfriend help me experiment. We both had headphones on and she moved the mic all around the room while I played the kit.

We were both surprised where the mic ended up. Close to the ceiling, way off to the side, facing diagonally/down toward the floor in front of the bass drum... It sounded good in several places but then she found that sweet spot that made the whole kit come to life and had perfect balance.

It's also good to see what things sound like by bouncing the mic off glass or sticking it in the corner facing the wall. Place the mic in a coffee can or the end of a long PVC pipe or at the other end of the air vent...

After the recording you can always experiment with sending the track through some distortion or other guitar pedals for some interesting sounds.
 

HeadRush

Senior Member
thanks for these great ideas
what I kind of also want to try is maybe record the guitar and drums for a band through one mic with the guitarist and his amp in one room with the mic and my drums in another and the singer in one room with his own mic.
that seems like it would be cool to try. I've also noticed that the farther away the mic is away from the drums, the deeper the tone is, so I would assume that I would get an intensely powerful sound like that.
has anyone else tried that?
or maybe has another way of giving a nice wall of sound?
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Way back, maybe 1971 or so, I would place a mic in the bathroom and close the door almost all the way, and place another mic in my room with the kit. The stereo effect was pretty extreme, but blended together, it was a wonderful slushy, lazy ambience that couldn't be achieved even with the outboard gear of the day.

Mic placement is as important as tuning, damping, and eq. Experiment away!

Bermuda
 

HeadRush

Senior Member
yeah thanks
I really like the sound of putting the mic in a different room
it' gives a great effect
earlier today actually, I was in my garage with the mic in a car. I turned up the bass on the mic and kept the mid and high right in the middle and I got one of the most powerful sounds I've ever gotten. It was pretty cool.
 

georgeman

Senior Member
i have a 2 mic system.
the first mic is above my drumset in the center. this is eq.ed to pick up most of the set.
and my second mic is taped to my throne leg aimed up at my snare to pick up the sound of the snare. this way effects can be given to the snare that isnt given to the entire set.

another thing i have done is put a single mic behind the kit in a coffie can that was pointing away from the kit. this has given a constant sound for the mids and highs but the bass was lacking

-george man
 

805Drummer

Gold Member
If your drums are on a riser or stage (which they probably aren't), it would be interesting to put one mic above your kit, and one below it.

Or open the window, and put the mic outside.
 
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