Increasing rudiment speed: one for all or to each their own?

beatdat

Senior Member
Last week I finished going through Alan Keown's "Mastering the Rudiments for Snare Drum in 28 Weeks"; it's a well laid out book, although the title is a bit misleading (perhaps "Learning the Rudiments for Snare Drum in 56 Weeks"), and I'm glad that I've gone through it.

The book is broken up into 14 sections, each one focusing on 3 new rudiments. At the end of each section is a musical exercise (similar to an etude, I suppose), that also focuses on the 3 new rudiments in that section (although they do incorporate rudiments learned in previous sections). These musical exercises are the highlights of the book, and I am now concentrating on working on all of them and will continue to do so.

My question is this: because some of my rudiments are faster than others, should I increase the tempo of each musical exercise depending on how fast I can play the slowest rudiments in that exercise, or should I maintain a base level tempo for all the musical exercise depending on how fast I can play the slowest rudiments (i.e. Swiss Army Triplets, Triple Stroke Rolls, Pataflafas, etc.) whether they are used in that musical exercise or not?

I'm inclined to maintain a base level tempo for all the musical exercises, and only increase the tempo for all the musical exercise once I can play the slowest rudiments faster. Does that seem like a good idea, or should I increase the tempo of each musical exercise independent of the others?

Any thoughts?

Thanks.
 

JohnW

Silver Member
I misread your question, so I'm editing my response,

Ditto for Todd Bishop (Cruise Ship Drummer) if you want to get a good perspective on/demystify this. Maybe the book title should be: "Mastering the Rudiments for Snare Drum in 28 Years"...

To your question: I strongly believe that you should play each musical exercise based on the maximum speed you can play the slowest Rudiment in that musical exercise. There's no reason to limit a musical exercise based on a different exercise that's completely independent from it. In fact, your focus should be pushing the slower Rudiments in the more challenging musical exercises to match the faster, comfortable exercises, rather than bringing an exercise you may be comfortable with down to the level of the more challenging ones.

So you should be playing these musical exercises at different tempos, all the while pushing your weaker Rudiments to match stronger ones. That doesn't mean tensing up to play faster. It will probably mean playing them dirtier and more out of your comfort zone. But eventually, you will match them!
 
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beatdat

Senior Member
Here's a link to a post by Cruise Ship Drummer (ToddBishop) that might shed some light on the subject.

http://www.cruiseshipdrummer.com/2015/07/rudiments-and-tempo.html
Thanks, his stuff always helps.

In fact, your focus should be pushing the slower Rudiments in the more challenging musical exercises to match the faster, comfortable exercises, rather than bringing an exercise you may be comfortable with down to the level of the more challenging ones.
That's what I was trying to figure out, I just didn't have a rational approach either way. Yours makes sense. Thank-you.

So you should be playing these musical exercises at different tempos, all the while pushing your weaker Rudiments to match stronger ones. That doesn't mean tensing up to play faster. It will probably mean playing them dirtier and more out of your comfort zone. But eventually, you will match them!
Good to know. I had a feeling that was permitted, but I wasn't sure. Thanks again.


Any tips or exercises for pataflafas, swiss army triplets, and triple-stroke rolls?
 
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