In sick of this... Sorta going off the You guys are great

Sparkboss

Senior Member
In addition to the great words already said, try not to concern yourself with other players ability or ego....music is not a sport, its an art meant to be shared not compared!
This is a very good mindset to be in. Never feel bad because you can't do what you see or hear somebody else doing. instead try to listen to it over and over again, and analyze it note by note. not only will you eventually learn to do what they did, but once you clean it up and get some speed in it, you can customize it to fit your sound!
 

xsarith

Senior Member
I can see why a lot of you dislike them and I can agree that being a super fast player doesnt make you a better player, but dont cast aside all metal bands for being...I don't know... jazz bands! There's some really intelligent stuff out there if you look.
Ahh dont get me wrong, I'm a metal player, but I want to expand into more creative and advanced drumming. Your defiantly right, there are some incredibly creative metal drumming out there. I double bass and use a 16 bar roll in one of my songs but that's about as long as I go for in song, although I can go way longer I just personally don't like a constant roll but breaking it up or doing some creative stuff is great.

I love metal music, and some creative metal drumming, I just don't like being another metal drummer surrounded by a large number of metal drummers who think there a drumming dog haha. Plus I've started to think that most (not all) metal drumming is pretty similar per song and is really boring and that jazz for example is more creative and musical, but of course its all a preference of style, however being a good drummer and knowing your stuff about drumming isn't I believe.

Your Public Profile.​
Yeahh I kinda realised after I said that...
 

CreeplyTuna

Silver Member
harryconway thats probably a pretty good point and how did you know was 17 haha? In everything I've done I've always looked at stuff as "if they enjoy it leave them be cause it not hurting anyone" motto but for drumming I don't, I should though just leave them to it I guess. maybe because they practically try to shove it down my throat that their the best drummer around haha, but yeah I think I need to stop being as so concerned with it.
Where I live there's not a lot of love for metal. Everyone likes either classic rock (_Led Zepplin, Beatles, Pink Floyd, only! with a few exceptions),radio friendly rock (Foo Fighters, WhiteStripes, Metallica,etc.) or electronic stuff ( top single of the week, rap, and dubstep included). So from my point of view, it's John Bonham and... drum machines that are being shoved down my throat.

Based on somepeople in this thread, even guys like Bill Brufford are playing "wrong", because he doesn't play a straight groove, yet he's no metalhead. Furthermore, I agree that 16th note doublebass patterns are neither very creative or even artistic unless used tastefully, something the "-core subgenre isnt good at imo. However, many metal bands hae broken the mold, bands like Tool, Opeth, Agalloch( beautiful folk metal!),you could almoat say Porcupine Tree because of the way they incorporate heavy music into their songs. I hate to sound like a fanboy, but ISIS rarely uses double bass and Aaron Harris actually carries an incredible groove, check out the song Wills Dissolve if you dont belive me. Also, Minsk and Neurosis have crazy tribal like drumming that is very different than typical blast beats.

I can see why a lot of you dislike them and I can agree that being a super fast player doesnt make you a better player, but dont cast aside all metal bands for being...I don't know... jazz bands! There's some really intelligent stuff out there if you look.
 

xsarith

Senior Member
Hey guys, thanks for all the replies.

My opinion only...

Get a highly qualified teacher who teaches various styles, reading and technique. You'll find that over time you may need to change teachers as well.

Diving deep into drumming requires deep involvement in music. Understand history of the music and instrument.

Understand that technique is nothing more than a means to an end with the "end" being able to execute easily the musical ideas from within. It seems these days technique has or is becoming a sport and not put in tandem with music.

Reading provides you the skills needed to grow for a lifetime. You'll be able to pick up any book and study from it. To go along with this if you have been through the process of studying with a teacher, you'll learn insights on how to get the most from any book. In most cases a book can go way beyond what is written on the pages. Once you learn how to interpret the information, your learning potential is endless.

This is a journey with no destination. Patience, patience, patience is necessary and realize improvement occurs with consistent practice, focus and over time. It's rarely an instant gratification thing.

Lastly, play with other musicians and stay focused and humble.
dmacc this Helps quite a lot, I did used to have a drum teacher for a few months who was a great drummer and teacher and I really enjoyed his lessons, unfortunately my job ended and couldn't afford them anymore, If I ever could then I would defiantly start lessons again. So failing getting a teacher, books seem like a good idea, are there any that anyone would recommend? As for the journey with no destination, that's kinda what I love about drums and instruments as a whole, you can keep playing but theres always something to learn right?

Well, for one, stop being sick. That gets you no where. Let those 17 year old metaldrumgodsintheirownminds do what they do. You can't change them. Follow your desires.​
harryconway thats probably a pretty good point and how did you know was 17 haha? In everything I've done I've always looked at stuff as "if they enjoy it leave them be cause it not hurting anyone" motto but for drumming I don't, I should though just leave them to it I guess. maybe because they practically try to shove it down my throat that their the best drummer around haha, but yeah I think I need to stop being as so concerned with it.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
as soon as you are bothered with what others are doing is the very second you lose focus on your own goals... . whether you think so or not

just do you bro ....and embrace what they do as a nice counter to your own style
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
I'm sick of the way drummers my age and in my area seem to think there a drumminggod ....

I'm sick of that and i dont want to be another crappy metal player ....
Well, for one, stop being sick. That gets you no where. Let those 17 year old metaldrumgodsintheirownminds do what they do. You can't change them. Follow your desires.​
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I'm gonna' just say it, and if it's offensive, most other guys on these forums don't care to offend, why should I?. Piss on Metal drummers. PISS ON THEM. Groove drummers, the gents who can play a laid back groove with soul, and hit that pocket just right, are the real drummers, and that method of drumming is becoming a lost art.
?!?...

That's a pretty narrow look on the world of drumming, have you read Drummerjunkie04's post? That's a better global vision, why the hate? ...I really don't get it, sorry....
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Even with great technique, and a command of the language, if your musical ideas are misguided, or don't fit, or miss the mark...it doesn't matter how good your technique is. How you feel music is more important than having great technique and the ability to get around the set, even though those things are vital. How you feel music so it connects with your audience...I don't think anyone can teach you that, it's kind of up to you to figure out what really connects with the musicians and the audiences in your world.

Practice your command of the language for sure, your technique, rudiments, and your ability to move around the kit... but don't forget that your musical ideas are where the beauty really lies.
 

SticksEasy

Senior Member
I'm sick of the way drummers my age and in my area seem to think there a drumminggod cause they can blast beat and do "0mg f@st doubl£ b@ss!!!1!!112!" its annoying. And there axactly like the guys described on the "you guys are great" thread so I'm going to stop ranting now before it just copies that thread haha.

I'm sick of that and i dont want to be another crappy metal player, I want to be the guys on this forum, knowledgeable and great at there playing. I have some knowledge, I find drums fascinating, well just music really, I know who buddy rich, John Bonham and Steve gadd are and I've listened to them all.

I want to be great at playing, I'd say I'm fairly okay, can hold a beat atleast, unlike some drummers near me. But I'm nowhere near the level of playing I want to be at, just cause I've listened to great drummers doesn't make me one.

I want to get in to all the technical side of drumming not just hit everything but learn all the rudiments and advance stuff, however I've got no idea how to start. So I thought I'd ask you guys!

You are already off to a great start, my friend, and you are definately taking it the right way. When I start bitching about how metal drummers are all about their double bass, and blast beat crap, I'm always told "Oh drumming is evolving. We have to accept it." Why do we have to except it? Why can't we enforce drumming's evolution in more than one direction.

It's getting to a point where drummers who don't have a double pedal are frowned upon. When drummers see me playing with a single, they assume I can't afford a double pedal. And when I play with my band, they look at me in disgust because I don't fall completely out of time for the sake of doing rediculous fills that do not fit the music.

I'm gonna' just say it, and if it's offensive, most other guys on these forums don't care to offend, why should I?. Piss on Metal drummers. PISS ON THEM. Groove drummers, the gents who can play a laid back groove with soul, and hit that pocket just right, are the real drummers, and that method of drumming is becoming a lost art.

Gents like Joey Jordison, Chris Adler, Mike Portnoy... They aren't drummers. They're percussionists. That's just how I see it
 
In addition to the great words already said, try not to concern yourself with other players ability or ego....music is not a sport, its an art meant to be shared not compared!
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
My vote for 'quote of the week' ... "Diving deep into drumming requires deep involvement in music. Understand history of the music and instrument"
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Good words already said here. It is difficult to keep the flame burning when part of your family life is helping to make sure there's enough food and all the fundamental essentials, but if your desire is strong enough, you will find a way to keep it burning. Good luck on your journey!
 

j-ronimo

Member
Rudiments are a must; Gadd is a great example of how they can be applied to the kit. Wrap your head around some stuff that youve never heard of; just start lookin up the Drummers on the Drummerworld main site here and see what projects they've worked on. Por example, i found this awesome album by the Damon Grant project with Heracio Hernandez on Drums. Salsa music, and the band leader (Grant) was a marimba player!!! very cool shit. Also, get yourself a couple of books covering styles that your not familiar with, its always cool to be able to blur the lines. I myself like getting my hands on latin percussion stuff, claves, 6/8, mambos and all that. Good luck!
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Hard part is being in the OP position but living in a small town where there are no good teachers...along with being from a family whos financial profile is below middle class.

These are the people I am from and feel the most for.

All I can say of true worth to those where I come from is to learn how to learn...not just what to learn...but how to endure the irritation and frustration of the effort.

If you can't afford regular lessons, save up and buy at least one from a regionally known teacher suggested by a regional college educational program...and make sure the teacher knows that you need to know what to study over time as you will not be able to afford the lessons regularly.

I would have saved loads of time with that approach...but I might not have found my voice the way I have - but music has lost more amazing potential due to restricted resources than have risen from it.(heck...thats true of all endeavours)

In short, I suggest learning persistant persistance that will endure beyond the energy youthful testosterone levels give - and the rest will come along.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
My opinion only...

Get a highly qualified teacher who teaches various styles, reading and technique. You'll find that over time you may need to change teachers as well.

Diving deep into drumming requires deep involvement in music. Understand history of the music and instrument.

Understand that technique is nothing more than a means to an end with the "end" being able to execute easily the musical ideas from within. It seems these days technique has or is becoming a sport and not put in tandem with music.

Reading provides you the skills needed to grow for a lifetime. You'll be able to pick up any book and study from it. To go along with this if you have been through the process of studying with a teacher, you'll learn insights on how to get the most from any book. In most cases a book can go way beyond what is written on the pages. Once you learn how to interpret the information, your learning potential is endless.

This is a journey with no destination. Patience, patience, patience is necessary and realize improvement occurs with consistent practice, focus and over time. It's rarely an instant gratification thing.

Lastly, play with other musicians and stay focused and humble.
+1 too :)
 
B

Bandit

Guest
My opinion only...

Get a highly qualified teacher who teaches various styles, reading and technique. You'll find that over time you may need to change teachers as well.

Diving deep into drumming requires deep involvement in music. Understand history of the music and instrument.

Understand that technique is nothing more than a means to an end with the "end" being able to execute easily the musical ideas from within. It seems these days technique has or is becoming a sport and not put in tandem with music.

Reading provides you the skills needed to grow for a lifetime. You'll be able to pick up any book and study from it. To go along with this if you have been through the process of studying with a teacher, you'll learn insights on how to get the most from any book. In most cases a book can go way beyond what is written on the pages. Once you learn how to interpret the information, your learning potential is endless.

This is a journey with no destination. Patience, patience, patience is necessary and realize improvement occurs with consistent practice, focus and over time. It's rarely an instant gratification thing.

Lastly, play with other musicians and stay focused and humble.
Very well said! I would just add to get a good practice pad, and play the crap out of it. Learn those rudiments early.
 

dmacc

Platinum Member
I want to get in to all the technical side of drumming not just hit everything but learn all the rudiments and advance stuff, however I've got no idea how to start. So I thought I'd ask you guys!
My opinion only...

Get a highly qualified teacher who teaches various styles, reading and technique. You'll find that over time you may need to change teachers as well.

Diving deep into drumming requires deep involvement in music. Understand history of the music and instrument.

Understand that technique is nothing more than a means to an end with the "end" being able to execute easily the musical ideas from within. It seems these days technique has or is becoming a sport and not put in tandem with music.

Reading provides you the skills needed to grow for a lifetime. You'll be able to pick up any book and study from it. To go along with this if you have been through the process of studying with a teacher, you'll learn insights on how to get the most from any book. In most cases a book can go way beyond what is written on the pages. Once you learn how to interpret the information, your learning potential is endless.

This is a journey with no destination. Patience, patience, patience is necessary and realize improvement occurs with consistent practice, focus and over time. It's rarely an instant gratification thing.

Lastly, play with other musicians and stay focused and humble.
 

xsarith

Senior Member
I'm sick of the way drummers my age and in my area seem to think there a drumminggod cause they can blast beat and do "0mg f@st doubl£ b@ss!!!1!!112!" its annoying. And there axactly like the guys described on the "you guys are great" thread so I'm going to stop ranting now before it just copies that thread haha.

I'm sick of that and i dont want to be another crappy metal player, I want to be the guys on this forum, knowledgeable and great at there playing. I have some knowledge, I find drums fascinating, well just music really, I know who buddy rich, John Bonham and Steve gadd are and I've listened to them all.

I want to be great at playing, I'd say I'm fairly okay, can hold a beat atleast, unlike some drummers near me. But I'm nowhere near the level of playing I want to be at, just cause I've listened to great drummers doesn't make me one.

I want to get in to all the technical side of drumming not just hit everything but learn all the rudiments and advance stuff, however I've got no idea how to start. So I thought I'd ask you guys!
 
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