If you were a drum instructor... I need your help.

MrKodySka

Member
I am 17 years old and play drums around town and at my church for the student ministries (Ages 13-18). I have been approached on more than one occasion about giving some of the kids lessons. I thought it would be a good idea because I don't have a real job and I could make a few bucks to fuel my drumming needs. I am not by any means a professional drummer but I definitely have chops on the kit, (Im not a beginner) , so I would only be able to teach kids the basics and intermediate stuff like that, but I have NO IDEA where I would start? What do you teach the kid first? An order of lessons would be great, and how much should I charge per hour? Seems how I am not a Pro and could probably use some lessons myself? I can read basic drum charts and stuff like that. If you are a drum instructor and you could 'Show me the ropes' of a basic lesson. That would be great!
 
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audiotech

Guest
Redundant thread??? Many students get annoyed at repetition and so goes for the people reading double threads.

Dennis
 

Zickos

Gold Member
The first thing I do with new students is ask them what they want to do, where they want to go. The second thing I do is get them to play so I can see where they are. In posting this thread in the first place, you seem like a smart kid. Teach them to play time in several different forms. I believe you can figure out the rest
 

MrKodySka

Member
Redundant thread??? Many students get annoyed at repetition and so goes for the people reading double threads.

Dennis
Yeah that was my bad. I felt like I worded the topic of this one weird so I made a new one but I cant figure out how to delete one.
 

LukeSnyder

Gold Member
I am 17 years old and play drums around town and at my church for the student ministries (Ages 13-18). I have been approached on more than one occasion about giving some of the kids lessons. I thought it would be a good idea because I don't have a real job and I could make a few bucks to fuel my drumming needs. I am not by any means a professional drummer but I definitely have chops on the kit, (Im not a beginner) , so I would only be able to teach kids the basics and intermediate stuff like that, but I have NO IDEA where I would start? What do you teach the kid first? An order of lessons would be great, and how much should I charge per hour? Seems how I am not a Pro and could probably use some lessons myself? I can read basic drum charts and stuff like that. If you are a drum instructor and you could 'Show me the ropes' of a basic lesson. That would be great!
Hey! I would be perfectly happy to Skype with you about how I approach beginner lessons, and teaching in general. Just PM me, and we can work something out. Basically, these are the main areas that I teach:

Grooves - I start with simple quarter note rock beats, then move on to 8th note beats, then 16th note grooves. I keep it pretty straight forward and generally useful, but then begin to branch out into more specialized grooves, and make sure we're working in the direction of the stuff that the student wants to play. I try to cover rock, funk, R&B, some jazz, metal, odd times, and various ethnic grooves. For example, soca, samba, salsa, reggae, etc. Groove Essentials 1.0 and 2.0 are highly recommended!

Licks/Fills - This varies a lot, and is dependent on the style of music that we're playing. This will vary from teacher to teacher as well, since everyone sort of has there own "pet" licks and fills. You should try to cover the common ones. Also, make sure you orchestrate various rudiments around the drum set, and give the student tools to create their own licks and fills. The Language of Drumming gives you tons of tools for this sort of thing!

Rudiments - Pretty self explanatory, go through the PAS 40, Stick Control, and Syncopation. This of course also goes hand in hand with teaching technique.

Technique/Time/Coordination - I consider all of these to be very interrelated, they form the mechanical aspects of drumming. I try to really take it easy on technique and coordination with beginners, instead getting right into keeping good time and actually playing some groove. Emphasize metronome work, and as the student progresses, start adding more and more technique and coordination work. I recommend Secret Weapons for the Modern Drummer, Unburying the Beater, and Great Hands for a Lifetime for technique; and The New Breed for coordination. Other great coordination resources are Gavin Harrison, Marco Minneman, and Thomas Lang's DVDs.

Reading - This I generally don't put a ton of focus on, I just deal with it as it comes up. Everything that I teach, I write out. When I teach a new concept, I teach the notation along with it. Before long, the student has a natural and comfortable grasp of sight reading.

Of course, that really only scratches the surface, but the resources I mentioned and areas of study will give you plenty to work on for the rest of your life, and should allow you to take any beginner well into the intermediate stage!

I hope this was helpful!
 

LukeSnyder

Gold Member
Oh, and I forgot to mention, I think a fair starting price to ask for drum lessons is $20/hr., since you are not an experienced teacher yet. Thats obviously just my opinion, but it seems to be a reasonable number, just from what I've observed. Most people don't bat an eyelash at $10 for a half hour lesson. However, that might be selling yourself short, depending on how well you'll actually be able to teach, once you get your battle plan started. Perhaps just ask the parents of the people you would be teaching what they would consider a fair price, and explain that while you are an experienced drummer, you haven't taught before.
 

TNA

Senior Member
Here's a link to a very similar thread if you feel like reading through it. http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?p=948389#post948389

I began teaching when I was 17 also. Although many people may disagree that you should have more experience before giving lessons, I think if people are asking you then they hold you in high enough regard to teach. The thing about teaching drums is that no two lessons are the same, no two teachers are the same. Sure everyone learns rudiments and the same beats, but every student learns at a different pace and in different ways. So even though I would highly recommend making a lesson plan beforehand, you'll probably find that you will stray from it often. I would start the same way you started learning drums, and remember what you did when you first started. Remember that the whole point of hiring someone to give lessons is to get their insight, anyone could go buy a book and try to learn drums, but taking lessons from a real person is a totally different experience. So go write a lesson plan, and post it on here and we can help you go from there.

How much should you charge? Pretty much the standard rate is 20 per half hour. Teachers more in demand can charge a bit more, and if you are new and trying to get students you can charge a little less. I would stick with half hour lessons, I find that going more than that is cramming too much info for the student to practice during the week, and an hour can feel very long and the student will pay less attention.

If you want more help feel free to message me and get some insight from someone else who started giving lessons at 17.
 
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audiotech

Guest
Yeah that was my bad. I felt like I worded the topic of this one weird so I made a new one but I cant figure out how to delete one.
No problem MrKodySka. We just see a lot of double posts on here.

Dennis
 
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