I will NEVER buy / own _______, and here's why.

Groov-E

Silver Member
Me, 4 years ago: i'll never buy a yamaha drum;

Me, 3 years ago : i'll never buy a red drum again;

Me, 2 years ago : i'll never buy a 22x18.

Me, now : 2 yammies with 22x18 bd including a red automn one (MHA)

Had I kept my pearl masters birch and only buy the mha this year, I would have saved more than 3000$ and wasted less time.

Be careful what you write here.

I'll never buy drums again. :)
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Yeah, I get your point. I'm just saying there is a pettiness to it too, of which I fall victim to also.
Yea, pettiness. It's one of the hallmarks of being a first world country. Hey as long as everyone does something...for the greater good of others...on a somewhat regular basis...I believe that balances out the pettiness. I'd say that being generous is the opposite pole of being petty. And the pettiness we're talking about isn't thrust upon anyone else.

That's a different, worse kind of petty.

Tom Petty could be one of the best types of petty. Hey, cut me a break, c'mon, I had to take it :)

Gear pettiness is just a choice thing. It's not really petty. I think the true form of petty has to involve another person. A tit for tat type person.

Man can I talk myself into something or what?
 

RaxCity

Senior Member
I will never buy a Paiste RUDE cymbal, and the reason is because I just hate the sound. They just sound so harsh and ugly, I don't really understand why people might like to use them. I also hate how they look, and if I wanted a bright cutting cymbal, I'd much rather look at paiste's 2002 or signature series.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Yea, pettiness. It's one of the hallmarks of being a first world country. Hey as long as everyone does something...for the greater good of others...on a somewhat regular basis...I believe that balances out the pettiness. I'd say that being generous is the opposite pole of being petty. And the pettiness we're talking about isn't thrust upon anyone else.

That's a different, worse kind of petty.

Tom Petty could be one of the best types of petty. Hey, cut me a break, c'mon, I had to take it :)

Gear pettiness is just a choice thing. It's not really petty. I think the true form of petty has to involve another person. A tit for tat type person.

Man can I talk myself into something or what?
That's a nice layer of sugar coating. Haha

I don't think I will ever buy a 2 floor tom drum set. Why? It takes up too much floor space & I'm too fat to reach it comfortably.
 

spleeeeen

Platinum Member
I'm wondering if any of you have ever tried tactile monitoring in a gig setting? If you have, & set it up correctly, + given yourself a while to acclimatise, then I can take the rejection of the concept. If not, I encourage you to think a little outside the box.

They don't provide astounding benefit in every situation, but on a loud stage, & especially where audible monitoring will interfere with the drum mic's, they have strong value. We drummers are used to not hearing our bass drums as clearly as we'd like. On a loud stage, that often robs us of the luxury of judging dynamics. Tactile monitoring brings that back to the party.

A misconception is that it's just a vibrating seat, but the brain soon completely ignores the vibrations, & instead "hears" the bass drum tone. Don't forget, a significant portion of our low frequency "hearing" is actually through the body & not just our ears directly. Ever wonder why your bass drum sounds different when captured with a room mic compared to you actually standing in the room?
There is a difference between the lower level seat shakers/butt thumpers and the more advanced tactile monitoring systems that I believe Andy is referring to. My Porter and Davies system has just made a world of difference in my playing and gigging experiences.
Same here. With my P & D I "hear" the full tone and duration of bass drum notes on the same level as snare and toms. There's an enhanced connection with the bass that I find really useful. Necessary? No (I don't use it on every gig). Additive in a helpful way in certain settings? Yes.


Ugh, there I am doing that thing where I ask and answer my own questions.
 

petrez

Senior Member
I will never buy a Paiste RUDE cymbal, and the reason is because I just hate the sound. They just sound so harsh and ugly, I don't really understand why people might like to use them.
Well, I have some Rude crashes (and a china), and I really prefer them to my 2oo2's for most of what I play nowadays (thrash/death metal), at least live, when cutting through shredding loud guitars are needed. My 2oo2's (Medium and Power crashes) gets sometimes too mellow in those circumstances, and I think the Rude Thin Crashes (they're not really thin when compared with thin crashes of other series, but the thinnest of the Rude crashes) is the best of "both worlds" sort to say. I understand where you come from though, but I think they have a purpose for those specific styles that requires maximum cut and projection. They might sound better further away than right behind the kit though. As for the looks, I think they look "raw" and pretty cool, you stand out from the regular "B20 crowd" when using these...
 
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DrummerSneed

Senior Member
A splash or China cymbal. I just don't like the sound of either.

Although I do own a cowbell, I don't think I will ever play it again. You want to play Honky Tonk Women or Hair Of The Dog? Sure, I will use rim clicks or strike my sticks together.


A house-The way my life is going these days....
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
For some reason, Pearl, DW and maybe Tama don't do it for me. Hardware, fine, but just not the drums. It's a subjective/feeling thing. I don't know if unconsciously its the sound of the name itself, something historical, how they look (especially the lugs), or who I associate them with.. but I never look to buy them. For some reason, I'm drawn to Sonor and Yamaha. I love Yamaha hardware.

I don't like overly deep rack toms, especially square sized; they are hard to position and look a bit ugly to me.

E-Kit... well.. I own one but only out of necessity. It barely gets touched now since I found a room to rent at the local rehearsal studios. I can't bring myself to sell it though; it has been useful for "in-house jams". It's hard to explain why, you just don't get the feedback like you do on acoustic. I love the organicness of hitting acoustic drums and cymbals, it so.... satisfying! Not to mention I think they sound so so much better especially in a live environment.
 
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bigiainw

Gold Member
I'm using a 16 inch and 18 inch A custom crash, and I'm not too fond of them. Not really. I like the 16 inch better than the 18 inch by far. The 18 inch just doesn't appeal to me at all.
I have 17-18-19- love the odd sizes but the 18 just never works or me- sounds fine out front but gives me a headache up close!
 

axisT6

Senior Member
Drum Triggers - I like the sound of a well tuned kick. For high speed clarity, I have done well with a tighter batter, patch, hard beater, and lots of beater throw.

Direct Drive Pedals - I like the power you get from chain drives.

Snares less than 8" deep - I love the sound of deep snares.

Thin rides - I like my rides heavy.

Crash cymbals exceeding $12.00 per inch diameter - I don't see the value in spending $300 for a single crash cymbal. I have many crashes in the 17" - 21" range that have a rough average cost of $200 each. I have been very happy.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I will probably never buy another splash or a china again.

There's nothing wrong with them, but I don't foresee myself ever playing music again that I felt required them.

I'll probably never own a double kick pedal either.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
There's fun to be had here. I mean, who would ever want to own

- an instrument 'designed' for the convenience of theatre managers rather than for musicians;
- an instrument that fires most of its sound onto the floor or into your knees;
- an instrument full of different sized percussion components that you're supposed to play with one size of stick;
- an instrument that's based on stock sizes of lampshade;
- an instrument that requires you to cross one hand over the other in order to play it...

...in fact, who in their right mind would ever buy/own a drum kit?

Oh... er, hang on... : )
Pianists cross their hands frequently in order to play, so I'm not buying that one.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I will probably never buy another splash or a china again.

There's nothing wrong with them, but I don't foresee myself ever playing music again that I felt required them.

I'll probably never own a double kick pedal either.
I'm with you on this one. Coming up in the 80s, thanks to Stewart Copeland, I felt compelled to have a splash (or three) in my set-up. And thanks to listening to the Bob Florence Big Band with the late great Nick Ceroli on drums, I was compelled to own some kind of China cymbal, and both have no longer been used for so long now. I think my problem was, both The Police and the Bob Florence Big Band already had drummers, and it was never gonna be me ;)

And as much as I admire the foot dexterity of a lot of our double bass drum technicians out there, that's never gonna be me either. My job is to groove the band and make 'em dance. It's rare when I insist on having three toms too.
 

loki03xlh

Senior Member
3 things come to mind right away---18 inch "bass" drum, any virgin bass, and "floor" toms without legs. The reasons are that I like big drums, I can't get the mounted toms where I like them, and 16 x 16 or 18 x 18 toms look better with legs (and they're heavy)
If you ever play a kit like the one pictured, it will change your mind about mounted floor toms. I had the exact kit (but in a maple finish) and the 16 and 18 inch mounted toms were quite stable and able to be positioned perfectly. Plus, the resonated much more being mounted to a stand instead of having 3 legs touching the floor.
 

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steadypocket

Gold Member
If you ever play a kit like the one pictured, it will change your mind about mounted floor toms. I had the exact kit (but in a maple finish) and the 16 and 18 inch mounted toms were quite stable and able to be positioned perfectly. Plus, the resonated much more being mounted to a stand instead of having 3 legs touching the floor.
Nope, my mind wouldn't change. In fact, there would be several things I'd dislike about that kit.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I don't like the huge spread on the legs of the stand holding the two floor toms. So much extra room needed. You can buy cradles with straight legs to provide resonance.
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
If you ever play a kit like the one pictured, it will change your mind about mounted floor toms. I had the exact kit (but in a maple finish) and the 16 and 18 inch mounted toms were quite stable and able to be positioned perfectly. Plus, the resonated much more being mounted to a stand instead of having 3 legs touching the floor.

I'm just really traditional. So my floor toms must be mounted on legs. As a bass player I also use very traditional bass gear. Must be a moderately-old-guy thing...
 

jornthedrummer

Silver Member
I also prefer my floor toms on legs, both in terms of convenience/positioning and sound. My floor toms must be down in the basement in terms of sound.
 
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