I need some advice!

dkamta

Junior Member
Hi everyone, this is my first post on this forum, and so far i've obtained soo much info and so on from here it's great!

My question is that i am a right handed player, i play with arms crossed just like the standard position. I haven't been drumming too long, and my right leg can't do a triple beat on the bass...sorry for my lack of drum terms lol. I then sat down and raised both legs, and suprisingly my left felt much lighter/easier to pull off the ground, so i tried to play left footed and open handed with a lefty drum setup. It works, and i can now hit the "triple beats" but everything else seems so much more awkward.

Should i stay with this new set-up? or should i go back to my standard righty setup and hope for the best?

Maybe my drum throne is an issue? It's quite small and very uncomfortable... I would really appreciate any tips or advice on what to do with my situation. I really get frustrated when i literally cannot lift my leg to hit the pedal...

Thanks all for reading.
 

razorx

Platinum Member
A comfortable throne and great pedals are the two essensial things you need to get off to a great start. I would try to get a better throne. What kind of pedal are you using. And i think you are referring to triplet.....which i honestly have no clue how to exlplain to do them. I'm not all caught in in the mumbo jumbo terminoligy. I just play...If that makes any sense. Hope this helps.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
There are no rules. Just 'cause you're right handed or left handed, has no bearing how you set up your kit. Your pedal, while not top line, is no POS either. If you want to persue a left handed set up, or an ambidextrous set up, cool. That just makes "your" kit stand out from the 95-99% of everyones righty set. I use a center system pedal http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u162/hrconway/134-3415_IMG.jpg when I run a double pedal. This pedal encourages ambidextrous thinking/kit design. With the bass drum directly in front of you, you can build your kit going left, right or both ways. No rules, hardly any limits.
 

ccutler69

Member
Your pedal is probably not the issue since its brand new and not rusted, worn etc.

I'm pretty sure A LOT of people learned how to play drums, and play them well, on that exact Pearl model or one very similiar.
 

spirit

Senior Member
A matter of comfort really- I would find the same thing in the early days, I was using a really nasty cheap drummers throne- when I got my Rocnsoc throne- things changed for the better, the padding is very deep and the fabric breaths, the metal work is very sturdy. Also you may find that the height makes a differance- try setting the throne lower, so you dont have to lean into the drums to play, the aim is to keep your back as straight as possible, so many people forget that the drums and set up has to fit the individual- so no one elses settings or arrangment will feel as good as your own.
Remember the rule, back straight and make everything in reach so you can for example hit centre of each drum with ease- for me that means that my tom in front is angled slighly towards me, the one on the right of that is angled slightly tomwards me and the first tom and the floor tom is angled towards me...comfort matters a lot when you play a lot and in the end your body will thank you for it.....ten years from now!

I figured that out when I asked my drum teacher why he had a bump in his back between his shoulder blades - he was a pro who played for the BBC most of his life and taught when he retired...he told me years in the pits with orchestras, etc using a high throne ment he bent into the drums to play-- the result- dodgy back forever!

Good luck mate- you will find what works for you!
 

mrchattr

Gold Member
Your throne may certainly have something to do with it. No matter what, even when I am playing house kits, or even just sitting in with another band for a song, I take two things: My throne and my sticks. You don't want to break another player's sticks, and I find that I play better on my throne than any other. I can play a bunch of different way, and even learned how to play lefty pretty well (I am a righty), so I can sit behind just about any kit and play it...but if I'm on my own throne, I'm 100 times more comfortable, even if everything else is set up totally "wrong" for what I'm used to.

With that said...it's never smart to take an easy way out with drumming. There are a lot of ways to fake things as you get into more advanced playing, but then all you are, at the end of the day, is a sloppy drummer who can't really do what what you want to do behind the kit. If you want to work on triple strokes on the bass drum, then work on them. Put in a half hour every day, just on that technique. Study videos out there on foot technique. Start slow, and build up your speed. If you mess up, stop, and start over. It can get boring and it can take time, but in the end, you will have mastered that technique, will feel awesome about it, and then will eventually hit a road block and start over. I'm 28 years old, have been playing for 25 of those years, and make a living playing the drums...and I still have stuff where I have to do this.
 

dkamta

Junior Member
To ccutler69: My pedal is actually very used and rusted...came that way when i bought the kit second hand. That was just a picture from guitarcenter...

Anyways, i agree with everyone here and thanks for all the advice. I think im switching back to my comfortable righty set-up and getting a new throne which actually doesn't rock around and has even padding lol. And yea, mrchattr, i really should practice more concentrated like that.

Again, thankyou all for the input! :)
 

SGT_Drummer

Senior Member
Hi everyone, this is my first post on this forum, and so far i've obtained soo much info and so on from here it's great!

My question is that i am a right handed player, i play with arms crossed just like the standard position. I haven't been drumming too long, and my right leg can't do a triple beat on the bass...sorry for my lack of drum terms lol. I then sat down and raised both legs, and suprisingly my left felt much lighter/easier to pull off the ground, so i tried to play left footed and open handed with a lefty drum setup. It works, and i can now hit the "triple beats" but everything else seems so much more awkward.

Should i stay with this new set-up? or should i go back to my standard righty setup and hope for the best?

Maybe my drum throne is an issue? It's quite small and very uncomfortable... I would really appreciate any tips or advice on what to do with my situation. I really get frustrated when i literally cannot lift my leg to hit the pedal...

Thanks all for reading.

i think you've actually found yourself in a very good position for a beginner. in that you've started playing the righty set up and have now switched to lefty. if you continually switch periodically you have the chance to have every part of your body completely independant, opening a world of possibilities. you can easily teach yourself things like switching from crossed over playing to open playing like carter beuford seemlessly, and complete freedom on your feet allowing what otherwise would be very difficult hi hat & bass pedal work. this is something i have continually struggled with in my time behind the set and still prove to be a little troublesome for me.

the only thing i would like to stress is to make sure your not switching because something is too difficult. when you run into things like that mentally prepare yourself to learn how to do what it is your trying to do. like you've mentioned, you couldn't do the triplets with your right foot but you can do them now with your left. well now that you know how it feels, switch back and teach your right foot to do it. trouble spots like this won't be worked out overnight. it's going to take time, effort, sweat, and maybe even some blood (lol). but the end result, is that you will be a VERY good, very disciplined drummer.
 

rootheart

Senior Member
i play with arms crossed just like the standard position.
arms crossed like right hand on the closed hihat and left hand on the snare is not a "standard position"..it is just a way to play softer in a verse, while the main position is to play right hand on the ride cymbal, and establish the time on the hihat with your left foot..... I do have a hard time to teach beginner students not to play arms crossed, cause this is all they see on MTV, and this is what they think drumming is all about..grin
Playing your arms crossed, your left foot will be only used to keep the hihat closed...but the hihat is an istrument that wants to be played instead of just beeing kept closed.. this is why the hihat has a pedal and springs and all such..
Grin
 
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freebirdgdw

Silver Member
No one here seems to be addressing your pedal technique? Are you playing heel up or down? try switching from whatever you're doing and see if the other way works. You could also get a double pedal (I'm sure you could find a fairly cheap good pedal) then you can easily switch between your feet and work on both whilst keeping your set in the right handed position. When I got a double pedal, I'd been already playing for a couple of years and had never used one before, so it was like starting all over again for my left foot. Its good that you are practicing with both already :)
 
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