I do not enjoy playing 24" kicks

Boomka

Platinum Member
For me, it's always the depth of the drum that makes the biggest difference to its playability. 24x14 is fine - if not ideal - because the sound happens quickly and the beater comes back fairly quickly. Deeper drums tend to swallow the beater and on particularly big and deep drums I feel like I have to wait too long for the sound to develop after my stroke.

Some really old drums were like 24x12 and the like. Totally workable. 24x20 or whatever? You can keep it for kindling.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
For me, it's always the depth of the drum that makes the biggest difference to its playability. 24x14 is fine - if not ideal - because the sound happens quickly and the beater comes back fairly quickly. Deeper drums tend to swallow the beater and on particularly big and deep drums I feel like I have to wait too long for the sound to develop after my stroke.

Some really old drums were like 24x12 and the like. Totally workable. 24x20 or whatever? You can keep it for kindling.
14" depth is about the best you can buy without having one made for you. If you can convert a marching bass drum they're usually 12" deep.

20" deep bass drums are a different beast, you have to really mess with them to get a decent sound from them. I'd love a 24x14 ludwig bass drum but the 24" I have is 16" deep still goes off like a cannon mind.

I'm interested to know why 14" deep bass drums aren't offered as standard.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
My 24 kit is a 40's Gretsch 24/13/16 with matching 6.5x14 snare....all calfhide. I'm in drum heaven at that point :)
8 lug 24, right there is your mush factor. Add calf heads and the response is going to be less.

Your title should read 'I do not enjoy playing 24" kicks with 8 lugs'

Every increment up in bass drum size takes some adjustment, 8 lugs on a 24 will be a noticeably softer feel.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I went from a 22" to a 24" and didn't notice a drastic difference, but what little I did notice could probably be chalked up to the beater hitting the 24 dead center, instead of the 22s just above center (no change to the beater height adjustment).

FWIW, I love my 24" and only played my 22" a couple times since - I don't miss it at all. 24" feels like home.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
20" deep bass drums are a different beast, you have to really mess with them to get a decent sound from them.
I've heard people say this before. My experiences with a deep bass drum are happy ones.

No matter what size the bass drum is, I basically tune them the same.

I have a 22 diameter by 20 depth DW bass drum and I never had to do anything different with it. In fact it is the most commanding bass drum tone in my stable.

Caddy used to say that a 20" depth sounds like ass (paraphrasing)

I just can't get on board with it because I love my 20" depth bass drum. (full reso, nothing inside) and don't understand the dislike.

People cite the beater response, that it's slower, Boomka said that he feels like it takes too long for the note to develop. Which puzzles me because sound waves travel at about 1100 feet a second. I really can't see why an extra 6 inches of depth would really alter things. But we're all different.

Luckily, it doesn't matter lol.
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
OK it's ported. Is it muffled too? Could it be the stuffing is sucking the life from the drum and you're working too hard?

If you're a full rebounder of the beater, man there's nothing like a wide open unmuffled kick drum, with a full front reso tuned up tight, and the batter tuned a little above JAW for a little rebound, that's the most that drum will put out. Unmiced it sounds great like that. It's all downhill from there in terms of tone and volume due to lost frequencies (when the drum is ported) or muffled out frequencies. (when the drum is muffled)

But if it's a shared kit that's not yours...assuming it is stuffed, at least take out the stuffing since its ported, and tune the front head up tight. That's easy. Unless it's glued in foam. Then you're hosed.
I'll have to look next time I play that one Larry. I'm 99% sure there is nothing in the bass for muffling.

Yeah it's a shared kit so limited with what I can do with it as far as tuning as I don't play at this campus much, only second time this year.

Also I did not alter my beater height, I kept it the same as it always is.
 

drumbent

Member
I switch from 18 to 20 to 22 and then 24 just to change it up. I love all the bass drums I have. Probably the easiest to play - for me - is my 22 Purewood renown.....incredible feel. My 24 kit is a 40's Gretsch 24/13/16 with matching 6.5x14 snare....all calfhide. I'm in drum heaven at that point :) - I use a late 50's WFL SpeedKing pedal with this kit....works for me. barely have to hit these drums and the tone is to die for.
That's a lovely kit. I'd hop on that and have a ball.

I play professionally, and my bass drums are 16x12, 20x14, 22x18, and 24x14.

I play the 16 a lot on my jazz and "background music" gigs (other sizes on that kit are 12" snare, 10" rack, 12" floor). I use the 20 for my pop or large jazz ensemble gigs, and the 24 gets hauled out for Big Band stuff (and for that style of music, which I'm sure most drummers don't get to play, that size gives the right amount of oomph to the sound). That said, I used to also used to use the 24 in a blues-rock power trio, and I loved the sound of it. And I'm also 6'3" and large / tall drums don't bother me, though I probably look a little silly behind the tiny jazz kit. lol The 22 was used in the same power trio, but I ended up preferring the 24 and the 22 has sat in its case for almost five years now.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I've heard people say this before. My experiences with a deep bass drum are happy ones.

No matter what size the bass drum is, I basically tune them the same.

I have a 22 diameter by 20 depth DW bass drum and I never had to do anything different with it. In fact it is the most commanding bass drum tone in my stable.

Caddy used to say that a 20" depth sounds like ass (paraphrasing)

I just can't get on board with it because I love my 20" depth bass drum. (full reso, nothing inside) and don't understand the dislike.

People cite the beater response, that it's slower, Boomka said that he feels like it takes too long for the note to develop. Which puzzles me because sound waves travel at about 1100 feet a second. I really can't see why an extra 6 inches of depth would really alter things. But we're all different.

Luckily, it doesn't matter lol.
I think it's because I'm most at home with my 22x14, saying that I've used a 24x20 for the past 10 years. All depends on which tubs I'm gigging.

I can get the same performance from both, beater response isn't anything I've noticed, you can play as quick on an 18 as I can a 26 but there's things like technique, head choices to throw into the mix. I find you have to use fairly lightweight heads to get a good sound. Mine hates Aquarian Superkicks and the Resonator front heads which dont really resonate.

I play my 24x20 as you do, totally open. Bad sound engineers nightmare! I used to have a 26x20 but that was a bit too impractical even though you could live in it.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Interesting thoughts here. I play a 24X16 and an 18X14. They feel quite different, of course, but I can't say one is easier or harder than the other to play.

I started with a 20" in about 1975, went to 24"s about 1980. I didn't really play 22"s until 2004 or thereabouts, and by 2010 had gone back to 24. I added the kit with the 18" most recently - maybe two years ago.

Maybe it really is a case of whatever we get used to.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I play my 24x20 as you do, totally open. Bad sound engineers nightmare! .
This is another thing I don't get. Why can't an engineer just slightly angle the mic like 8" away from the full front head, halfway between the edge and center? It just seems so simple but no, it's a huge issue. Break out the razor blades and blankets. I don't get it. How tunnel visioned.

Bonham had it right, with full heads and no muffle, the mics need some air around them. He wouldn't let engineers close mic him. I really go for that ambient miced tone. The drums sound airy and spacious. They also blend into each other, like we actually hear them. They make a cohesive, organic sound, not all separate "improved" sterilized sounds. Imperfections rock, it's what proves to us it's real. The close miced tone I'm fairly tired of by now. Killing the drum then re-creating it artificially....what a waste of time. Everything you want is already there. They are throwing out the baby with the bathwater. Ambient micing with wide open everything is literally a breath of fresh air to these ears. It's easy and fast. Requires a well tuned kit though and I really think that is the major stumbling block. It just seems like they thought it was faster (not better) to kill and recreate, where really with one person who can tune, it probably takes longer to kill and recreate. Just an opinion.

Long live overtones, and all hail to the sound engineers who recognize them.
 
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Les Ismore

Platinum Member
How many ppl on this forum are playing an 8lug 24" BD?

I'll bet its just Kona, and one, maybe two other ppl who may have a vintage 24"
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
How many ppl on this forum are playing an 8lug 24" BD?

I'll bet its just Kona, and one, maybe two other ppl who may have a vintage 24"
KONA wasn't the one saying the 24 was hard to play, nor was he the OP - that was konaboy.

However, KONA did put up the pic of the 8-lug 24".

I'm not sure the 8 lugs are relevant to the original poster's problem.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
KONA wasn't the one saying the 24 was hard to play, nor was he the OP - that was konaboy.

However, KONA did put up the pic of the 8-lug 24".

I'm not sure the 8 lugs are relevant to the original poster's problem.


Oh right, KONA and KONABOY... and the GRETSCH ROCK 24 has ten lugs, so with that juxtaposition we'll dial back on the mush factor, which 'is' always present when you play a larger BD size.
 

sdedge

Senior Member
well playing 24 or 26 is just adjust your playing, bigger bass drums are slower drums so fast bass drum playing is hard to do. but you got a bigger sound.
And also your beater is not in the middle of your bass drum what gives a different feel wen your playing.
So to make your live easer on the 24,26 ,Don't play it as a 22!
 

SpareRib

Senior Member
I bought a Mapex Mydentity all maple kit in 26x16, 13x9, 16x16, 18x16 and 14x7 snare. I tune them up tight and I love them. I tried going back to my 22x18, 10x8, 12x9, 16x14, and 14x5.5 but I really couldn't get into them again. I love the big drums! And big cymbals!
 

ZLeyba

Senior Member
I think it depends on your physique and that depth is more important than width in terms of off-head beater feel

I've had a 14x24 for 13 years now and played on pretty much every size under the sun. I definitely find it's much easier to play smaller kicks in general, but that 14x24, and 14x26 are not too much harder to play, any depth beyond that on those bigger kicks were always hard for me to achieve desired results with.

Really digging all the C&C kits with the classic short kick drums.
 

Friedmett

Senior Member
I enjoy playing my 2 16*24 birch bass drums and love how they sound. I have been doing it since 2003 with by incident 2 different pedals. Somehow I got no problem with that.

Iron Cobra Hp200 on the left

Iron Cobra Rolling Glide on the right

Big felt beaters adjusted to hit the middle.
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
Different strokes. I feel it's too much work playing an 18. A 24 I don't have to hit as hard. Are you rebounding the beater? This sounds opposite of what I experience, just goes to show that one man's bane is another man's joy.
+1. Played a 20" for for years. Had stomp the guts out of it to compete with the guitars and bass. Playing a 24" now (no 22", just skipped the middle-man) and it moves a ton of air effortlessly.
 
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