I could get rid of my rack tom now too...

adam!

Senior Member
Bo, you're wanting to ditch your rack tom, and I'm wanting to get a second bass drum! Go figure.
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
Well, the absence of the tom is merely for demonstration purposes here.

I've never understood why guys would bring one tom on a gig. You lose so many patterns and save ...what?...20 seconds of set up time?

As for the snare, I think the "in-between" size is kind of a gimmick that ultimately is splitting hairs. You can get a 6 1/2 plenty crisp (Bruford) and a 5" pretty fat (Gadd).

Benny sounds great. The ROOM sounds great. But all that "hand made" stuff is baloney. All instruments (drums, guitars, pianos, ) cheap and expensive, are made in part by hand and in part by machines.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I've never understood why guys would bring one tom on a gig. You lose so many patterns and save ...what?...20 seconds of set up time?
Well, it's all about what you need. You could say the same for every single tom on a big kit...

- Why did you only bring two toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a third.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring three toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a fourth.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring four toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a fifth.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring five toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a sixth.

...etc.

If you only need one tom for your style, why bother bringing more? Every piece adds to the load you have to pack, carry, fit in your car, unpack, mount, dismount, pack, carry and bring back in your car.
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
This is one interesting discussion. I own two toms (12" and 14") and I will use them. I have played with one tom a few times, and I did not care for it. I actually prefer no toms to one tom. Peace and goodwill.
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
Well, it's all about what you need. You could say the same for every single tom on a big kit...

- Why did you only bring two toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a third.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring three toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a fourth.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring four toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a fifth.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring five toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a sixth.

...etc.

If you only need one tom for your style, why bother bringing more? Every piece adds to the load you have to pack, carry, fit in your car, unpack, mount, dismount, pack, carry and bring back in your car.

Not really. You only have two hands and those two hands can create a multitude of variables and patterns with two toms that cannot be created with one. But adding more than two toms just changes a little of the tonality -- which is fine if that's what you want. But the latitude does not increase exponentially.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Well, it's all about what you need. You could say the same for every single tom on a big kit...

- Why did you only bring two toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a third.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring three toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a fourth.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring four toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a fifth.
*brings out another tom*
- Why did you only bring five toms? It would only take 20 seconds to bring a sixth.

...etc.

If you only need one tom for your style, why bother bringing more? Every piece adds to the load you have to pack, carry, fit in your car, unpack, mount, dismount, pack, carry and bring back in your car.
An extra tom, or 6 extra toms, might very well mean extra trips to the car. When you're playing that gig in the middle of the huge bumpy field (festivals, weddings, etc...), there's no cart that will work to make it a one-trip load in. That "20 seconds" might actually be an extra 5 minutes to and 5 more minutes from the car, in the sweltering midday sun.

Bo: I guess it depends on what your self-imposed *needs* are. If you feel less comfortable with only the floor tom, or perhaps find yourself still wanting to go for that rack tom when you're playing, then maybe it's not such a good idea. Also, the music will dictate what you need sometimes...are there any songs that NEED at least two toms for their signature licks? (Brick House, Land Down Under, and Don't Stop Believing come to mind...)
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I love playing with just a nice floor tom. They're so big, and have so many voices that I can get a lot of different "tom sounds" from just one by varying the accents, dynamics, and area of the drum I hit.

It also seems to make me more creative when the traditional rolls and tom patterns are not available. I really find it a lot of fun. Play gigs that way when I get the chance.
 

Anduin

Pioneer Member
I’d lose the floor tom and go with just a single tom straight in front of me instead of having just a floor tom. Partly because I find higher toms cut through better in fills, and partly so I could use either hand on the tom instead of mostly just my right on a floor tom.
 

Bruce M. Thomson

Gold Member
Thanks for that, I also thought that brush move was innovative; and about rack toms, I suppose it depends on the music you are playing but many rocker guitarists I know prefer simplicity from their drummer and certainly a stripped down kit fits the bill; even if they are not aware of how creative you have to become. I think when I do a little playing on my own this weekend I will leave the rack tom out of it which is just one less drum anyway and give it a shot. So thanks again, should be a good exercise. I'm mostly a meat and potatoes R & B type player anyway but practicing being creative is always good.

This guy doesn't even need a floor tom!

http://youtu.be/60zMDBqCt3U
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I've never understood why guys would bring one tom on a gig. You lose so many patterns and save ...what?...20 seconds of set up time?
You don't lose any patterns at all, you just voice them differently on the kit. I also think 20 seconds might be a bit of an understatement. Each tom has to be correctly positioned, mic'd, and re-tuned from the trip.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I’d lose the floor tom and go with just a single tom straight in front of me instead of having just a floor tom. Partly because I find higher toms cut through better in fills, and partly so I could use either hand on the tom instead of mostly just my right on a floor tom.

There's a set-up I'd really like to try, but I'd have to get a different (Offset) pedal. I lifted (and cropped) a pic from this site to show it - hope they don't mind:

http://theparadiddler.com/2010/02/16/product-review-off-set-double-bass-drum-pedal/

Centered snare and two bass mounted toms. You could always add a floor tom on either (or both) side/s. But I think I could do just fine with a 4 piece set up that way.





.
 
Last edited:

Chunky

Silver Member
You should check out Matt Halpern feom Periphery on youtube.

He's making snare, bass and floor set-up very popular at the moment.

I have to say my floor has become my main tom after watching him and the majority of linear fills and patterns are between those drums.

It's inspiring!
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
Bo, I think that you should drop the rack tom. However, I think that you should also do so keeping in mind that it's not going last, and that trying to make it last might not be the best idea either. Change facilitates creativity and ingenuity, so why not change for now and change again in the future?
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Bo, I think that you should drop the rack tom. However, I think that you should also do so keeping in mind that it's not going last, and that trying to make it last might not be the best idea either. Change facilitates creativity and ingenuity, so why not change for now and change again in the future?
I'm just saying that I could. And my set-up changes all the time depending on what I have to do. Somebody pointed out that Benny was doing this for demonstration purposes, and that was obvious, but what he was playing for the demonstration clearly demonstrates that he could do a gig without the rack tom too if he had to, and that's how I like to think I live too. The largest amount of drums I'll bring to a gig is a 5-piece and two crashes and a ride, but it's good to know that the music I get hired to play doesn't require even that much, or maybe it does, but my playing experience and talent are probably 90% of the equation, allowing me to use alot less (excuse how arrogant that line sounded). That was my main point. And I think alot of people should get away from this "everything I own is required" attitude regarding their gear. Unless you're Keep It Simple, that plays on big enough stages to accommodate his set-up, chances are, that you, like me, have to shoe-horn your gear into the smallest places most of the time - unless one of your gigs where all your gear is provided - like my current high-paying one.
 
Top