How should I drill a hole in my snare to give it a formal muffler?

AzHeat

Platinum Member
In over 40 years of drumming, scouring drum and music magazines and catalogs, going to clinics, talking with other drummers, etc.....I've never heard that internal dampeners were for volume control.

If they were/are, indeed, for volume control then they truly are useless as they don't control volume at all. I can't speak for other drummers but the velocity at which I deliver the mallets into the membrane is what determines volume for me.
They reduced or killed attack, so much less volume. Much different than moongel or something that allows the head to move freely, but slow at a much more rapid rate.

Agree with Larry’s post. There’s just no need for them. You can still order some Gretsch drums with them though oddly enough.
 

TxGroove

Junior Member
My overall philosophy is that musical instruments are tools, and anyone should be able to do anything to an instrument to best make it do what you need it to do.

With that said, I don't find the internal muffler (or whatever it's called) necessary. Back when drum makers were putting those in snares, I don't think there were a lot of options back then when it came to drum heads. These days, the options almost seem endless. Sometimes it's really difficult to find the perfect balance of getting the ring out while keeping a certain level of sensitivity, and some drums are more ornery than others.

Although I've struggled finding this balance, I think I have finally found it. My go-to combo these days is an Evans Reverse Dot coated head along with a Snareweight M80. The Snareweight is perfect for me. You can choose different amounts of ring control, and it's still sensitive enough to get a nice buzz roll. I have attached a pic below.

If you are apprehensive about drilling into your drum, there's a reason.

I ended up figuring out that the snare strainer is a bit funky, even when I tighten it up. It's one of those "O'Matic strainers" Radio King style... Love them.

It's an old marching snare so I'm not to sure if it's suppose to have a loose resonance on the snares.

It seems the previous owner chocked the strainer and made a indent on the snare shell, even using a copper wire as nylon?.... Never heard of that.

Doesn't seen to tighten up to a crisp, sharp attack, rather a lanky echo, even with new nylon cords... hard to explain, but I'm sure it needs pampering, probably a self explained error on the strainer I'm over looking.

As for the heads, I've heard Evans makes pretty good dry snare heads, I've owned a few actually. Still use them when I feel like being creative.

I also heard and from my own experience... played with a Aquarian Texture Coated Head with a power dot underneath, rather than on top. Pricey but worth it

I'll most likely have that one put on my Slingerland 5x10 metal snare, which is my master drum (with internal muffler).

As for the marching snare, I'll probably end up using a Remo Crimplock smooth white head and for the bottom; Tama snappy snares and Aquarian reso's.

If I'm not satisfied, I'll try the Evans (w/ dot on bottom) you suggested. Evans always seems to always come thru for any drummer...

Even tho I've never tried that particular head, honestly didn't even know that model existed... but seems like something I could really start to get into. Thanks for the imply.

The current head on my MS can't even do a drum roll, since I have to chock/over tune it, to get resonance. I might to a shop in town if I can't figure it out soon.

I needs a snappy snare drum.
 

TxGroove

Junior Member
Agreed that an external muffling product is probably your best bet, but on the chance that you really want that old-school muffler, you should use a step-wise drill bit to make the holes. It will keep the wood and wrap from splintering off as you drill. Before drilling, put a piece of masking tape over the spot too, just to be careful.

https://www.zoro.com/irwin-unibit-step-drill-bit-hss-13-sizes-18-12-in-unibit-1/i/G1647502/
I think I'll just play without a muffler. A vast majority don't even use or have muffler attached (Never new that).

Moon gel is a good buddy. Glad I asked before do anything...

I have a 5x14 Gene Kupra metal snare that has a muffler....

As from learning more about The Great Drum, I think I'll have the best of both worlds...
 

TxGroove

Junior Member
They reduced or killed attack, so much less volume. Much different than moongel or something that allows the head to move freely, but slow at a much more rapid rate.

Agree with Larry’s post. There’s just no need for them. You can still order some Gretsch drums with them though oddly enough.
Yeah, Gretsch is the rightful owners of Singerland, with respect to Gibson guitars.

A Gretsch or a Rogers would be my alternative drum kit.
 

TxGroove

Junior Member
Internal dampers IMO are a really bad idea, bordering on terrible. They interrupt the head vibrations, from the most undesirable side of the head...in one spot only.

Furthermore, in my opinion, they make a drum sound like ass lol.
Thanks for the honest advice :)
 
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