How Is This Drum Sound Achieved? (Ludwig CM)

Invicta

Junior Member
Is this drum sound in this video a signature "Ludwig Classic Maple" sound or is it mostly heads and tuning?


I love how open, big, round, yet punchy it is.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
The sound quality in that video is atrocious.

But yes, the boomy Bonham-like sound is easy to get from larger Ludwig Classic Maples.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Put the drum set that you own, as it is without modification, into your bathroom and play it. It will sound just like the set in the video.

.
 

Paul_MovementDrumCo

Junior Member
Based on his comment "
Simple Remo Coated Ambassador heads even on the kick !!! I am using the weckl pad on the batter side tune each key to one turn after everything has been finger tightened cross tuning tap to make pitched as even as possible front head is the same but I'm using a head with a collar ....5: hole at 4 oclock and you are golden ....toms take awhile to explain ....may do a tuning video"
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Agreed. If you want those old skool sounds, you have to use what was available back in the day. Ambassadors, or even black dots, on everything with proper tuning is the way to get it. I remember being a kid and spending hours experimenting with my only set of coated ambassadors to get it to sound right, and the process I learned how to tune. These days, with so many head choices, it's almost too easy to get a good sound (especially when the drums are made really well with nice edges and actual round shells!
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Is this drum sound in this video a signature "Ludwig Classic Maple" sound or is it mostly heads and tuning?
Pretty much any maple kit with a similar bearing edge (45 degrees, very slight round-over), with those sizes and tuning/muffling approach would work, assuming you can play like that. Whether you think the sound is good or bad, it's definitely appropriate for classic rock and roll.

The sound is coming from heads, tuning, and lack of muffling, but other things matter just as much. The size of the drums (looks like 22, 12, 14, and 16), the lower tuning, the single ply coated heads, and the loud, confident playing, all contribute. A kit with smaller sizes, played lightly, won't sound the same, even if you somehow adjust for the volume, after the fact. The actual vocabulary being played matters, too. Loud, fast singles, and licks that use the bass drum and toms (RLBLRB) work well on surfaces that don't have much rebound, due to their size and tuning.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Pretty much any maple kit with a similar bearing edge (45 degrees, very slight round-over), with those sizes and tuning/muffling approach would work, assuming you can play like that. Whether you think the sound is good or bad, it's definitely appropriate for classic rock and roll.

The sound is coming from heads, tuning, and lack of muffling, but other things matter just as much. The size of the drums (looks like 22, 12, 14, and 16), the lower tuning, the single ply coated heads, and the loud, confident playing, all contribute. A kit with smaller sizes, played lightly, won't sound the same, even if you somehow adjust for the volume, after the fact. The actual vocabulary being played matters, too. Loud, fast singles, and licks that use the bass drum and toms (RLBLRB) work well on surfaces that don't have much rebound, due to their size and tuning.
Yes. This is the answer to the question.

Also, along with the answers from Paul and Bo.

.
 

Invicta

Junior Member
Pretty much any maple kit with a similar bearing edge (45 degrees, very slight round-over), with those sizes and tuning/muffling approach would work, assuming you can play like that. Whether you think the sound is good or bad, it's definitely appropriate for classic rock and roll.

The sound is coming from heads, tuning, and lack of muffling, but other things matter just as much. The size of the drums (looks like 22, 12, 14, and 16), the lower tuning, the single ply coated heads, and the loud, confident playing, all contribute. A kit with smaller sizes, played lightly, won't sound the same, even if you somehow adjust for the volume, after the fact. The actual vocabulary being played matters, too. Loud, fast singles, and licks that use the bass drum and toms (RLBLRB) work well on surfaces that don't have much rebound, due to their size and tuning.
Bit off topic, but I wanted to point out something you said there: "...work well on surfaces that don't have much rebound, due to their size and tuning." Basically larger diameters have less rebound and lower tension heads have less rebound is what you're saying. So if someone cared about their rebound to get faster singles or maybe even doubles they would employ smaller drums and higher tension heads. Actually makes me consider a 14" floor tom for the first time.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
In my mind smaller drums AND higher tensions add up to the soup can sound.

Now, I've always liked the sound of bigger drums tuned higher because you can get more clarity but you don't lose the bigness of the sound.

That said, most gigs I go to it seems everyone is going for the oatmeal sack "how low can you go" sound. Maybe that sounds badass in the driver's seat, but it's a terribly boring sound in the audience. I've gone to see more bands that I care to admit where the drummer's high tom and floor tom sound the same...
 

Invicta

Junior Member
I found this yesterday and actually like this sound even better. It's clear I like Ludwig Classic Maples for sure, but this sound is a bit clearer but still deep and warm. My only question is, is that because of the recording process or is this sound achievable live?

 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I agree with all of the above responses. Full sized drums. Single ply coated. Tuned low.

My favorite exposition in this style was when Carter first got the Walnut GW...

 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I found this yesterday and actually like this sound even better. It's clear I like Ludwig Classic Maples for sure, but this sound is a bit clearer but still deep and warm. My only question is, is that because of the recording process or is this sound achievable live?

Those drums were definitely processed. I'm not sure what effect was used, but it's similar to the sound in this other video from the same channel. Notice the "clicky" sound, it's VERY noticeable. (Time Stamp 0:50).

I hate it when drum demos use effects or EQ to make the drums sound "better" or "larger than life." It's not genuine and it doesn't represent the sound you'll get when you take them home.

 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
As it has already been said, big drums, tuned relatively high, single ply skins, little muffling on bass, no muffling on the rest - boom.
Not the sound everyone would look for, of course, not easy to mike maybe, but the richer, the fuller.
 

TJK

Member
Agreed. If you want those old skool sounds, you have to use what was available back in the day. Ambassadors, or even black dots, on everything with proper tuning is the way to get it. I remember being a kid and spending hours experimenting with my only set of coated ambassadors to get it to sound right, and the process I learned how to tune. These days, with so many head choices, it's almost too easy to get a good sound (especially when the drums are made really well with nice edges and actual round shells!
Heck I would take worn heads and hold them over and electric stove to re-shrink the heads! Toms would get an almost hydraulic sound, snare head actually sounded good. I could make a snare head last all summer lol
 

Invicta

Junior Member
Those drums were definitely processed. I'm not sure what effect was used, but it's similar to the sound in this other video from the same channel. Notice the "clicky" sound, it's VERY noticeable. (Time Stamp 0:50).

I hate it when drum demos use effects or EQ to make the drums sound "better" or "larger than life." It's not genuine and it doesn't represent the sound you'll get when you take them home.

I absolutely hate that companies do this....
 

Invicta

Junior Member
Heck I would take worn heads and hold them over and electric stove to re-shrink the heads! Toms would get an almost hydraulic sound, snare head actually sounded good. I could make a snare head last all summer lol
That's freaking awesome.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
A 24 or 26, with a P3 (or coated Ambassador on the 26) is going to sound fat, open (a little air) and from 5 feet away super solid.
I was using 16(x14) and 18(x 16)" ft's, but switched to 15(x13) and 16 (x14). I used 13-15-16 years ago, and went back a couple months ago.
The 15 is a little quicker than a 16, noticeably beefier than a 14, and the 16 is a plenty deep enough last/low tone for just about anything.
A little less effort to move the gear too :) .
The first video pretty much sounds like what a good maple kit with coated ambassadors top and bottom sounds like.
Coated Emps top, coated Amb bottom seem to brighten the initial attack and make a slightly more distinct tone for me.
Just tune them decently, and you don't need muffling on them and they can breath. Tension can be higher or lower, but just so there isn't any wobble after you hit the drum so it doesn't create problems micing and you're good.
 
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