How do you hear it all?

drummer-russ

Gold Member
I am very concerned about keeping the hearing I still do have and did not like the idea of adding more volume with a monitor speaker pointing at me on top of the sound of my drums. I did some research and came up with a reasonably inexpensive solution thanks to advice from several on here including Bermuda.

I bought the unit in the picture. It was about $100 US. I bring a monitor feed into it and my vocals pass through it. Currently I use headphones that isolate fairly well. The added benefit of the pass through vocal mic is that I have immediate control of the level of volume for my vocals in my ear only. I can control the volume of the monitor mix as well.

My next step is to get some isolating ear buds and see if they work well enough to isolate the sound.
 

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Captain Bash

Silver Member
Hmm well, I am not kidding when I say that in my monitor mix all I want is vocals, bass and keyboards, plus a bit of kick drum mic. In my experience it's the guitars that cause all the hearing loss/fatigue. Even though they are not in my monitor mix I can always hear them, just at a sensible volume.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
What do you feel is the best bet for hearing everything, and for that matter, do you hear everything? Do you get a select mix of sound or the whole shebang?
TBH....

I've gave up trying to hear everything on stage 25 years ago. I just pop in my plugs and play and don't get hung up about it. The benefits of this philosophy are that it's cheap, easy to carry, requires little additional space in the van, and takes very little time to set up and break down.

;-)

If I really wanted to hear everything all perfect and pristine, I'd quit the band, sit at the bar, and have a beer with my wife.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
TBH....

I've gave up trying to hear everything on stage 25 years ago. I just pop in my plugs and play and don't get hung up about it. The benefits of this philosophy are that it's cheap, easy to carry, requires little additional space in the van, and takes very little time to set up and break down.

;-)

If I really wanted to hear everything all perfect and pristine, I'd quit the band, sit at the bar, and have a beer with my wife.
Like I said, normally, I just get on with it. But hell, if there's something I can do to be proactive and fix the problem, it's worth at least thinking about. The other thing about this band is that there are a lot of things that are not a fixed amount of measures, and it varies how long a solo or even a normal part might go. We all know ahead starting the song and we all agree on audio cues in the music or part to let us all come back together on the same beat. So when I can't actually hear the difference between each note or chord they play, it can make a blunder that's quite obvious.

For an update to all, the whole band talked about it last night and we are going to pool our money and buy a single mixer or something to collect the output from the sound guy and we will each have our own wedge monitor that we can use if the venue warrants it. I figure I'll set it up, and only use it or make adjustments if I need to.

I can't imagine that any decent sound guy will balk at giving us an even feed to run our own monitor system in addition.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
If you're playing with fuzzy guitars, ask any monitor guy to cut the 250Hz from most of the instruments except the bass for your mix. It's a temporary solution and I think in-ears are the answer but give it a go. 250Hz is generally where most instruments merge and you lose definition. Fuzzy guitars will definitely make this issue worse.
Thanks man, this is the kind of thing I wouldn't think of on my own. Not being sure what to ask for is what keeps me from making an issue of it with sound guys, who I find really run the gammut as to competency. Some of the nicest places I've played have had the worst sound guys. Weird sometimes.

I'll set something up in the practice studio to mimic what we're talking about and see how it sounds.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
Thanks man, this is the kind of thing I wouldn't think of on my own. Not being sure what to ask for is what keeps me from making an issue of it with sound guys, who I find really run the gammut as to competency. Some of the nicest places I've played have had the worst sound guys. Weird sometimes.

I'll set something up in the practice studio to mimic what we're talking about and see how it sounds.
Yeah, it's definitely a gauntlet. In the end, I just got used to playing with whatever was there. Some gigs that I played had no monitoring at all. You find ways around it but making the most of it shows you're serious about what you do - regardless of the competency of others.

The worst is lead singers who want a vocal-heavy mix yet cup the microphone and stand right next to the monitor. In my experience, it's shortly after that they start moaning about feedback...
 

T.Underhill

Pioneer Member
I am very concerned about keeping the hearing I still do have and did not like the idea of adding more volume with a monitor speaker pointing at me on top of the sound of my drums. I did some research and came up with a reasonably inexpensive solution thanks to advice from several on here including Bermuda.

I bought the unit in the picture. It was about $100 US. I bring a monitor feed into it and my vocals pass through it. Currently I use headphones that isolate fairly well. The added benefit of the pass through vocal mic is that I have immediate control of the level of volume for my vocals in my ear only. I can control the volume of the monitor mix as well.

My next step is to get some isolating ear buds and see if they work well enough to isolate the sound.
That's the same-ish setup with the Behringer Micromon and Etymotic isolation headphones. Our singer has the same box as you and he has no complaints.

If the monitor mix is too poor I'll drop the volume and try to rely on stage volume. If they have a wedge it stays on, I don't mess with it. The only thing I really need is my vocals so I stay in key.
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
Yep. Though the Rolls has a limiter and I was not sure if I really needed one but I wanted the option and so far I have not used it during the show. I do however use it at the beginning of sound check in case of nasty spikes. Since we are still getting to know how to run sound with a rather new board and not the most skilled members at sound, it seems prudent.
 

T.Underhill

Pioneer Member
Yep. Though the Rolls has a limiter and I was not sure if I really needed one but I wanted the option and so far I have not used it during the show. I do however use it at the beginning of sound check in case of nasty spikes. Since we are still getting to know how to run sound with a rather new board and not the most skilled members at sound, it seems prudent.
Yours also takes a 9 volt which could be handy. Fortunately I've haven't run into a power issue...yet. I need a power strip most gigs so I bring a super long extension cord.

I try to keep my little box at waist height so I can adjust as I'm playing, sometimes during songs.
 
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