How do I position each of the drums in the kit?

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
If you don't need that second rack tom, I'd lower that first rack town down (maybe on a separate stand), then drop and flatten your cymbals a little. This makes it super-comfortable to play. (A plate of BBQ, mac and cheese, cornbread, baked beans, and sweet tea always make me play better as well.)

YMMV.

 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
The drawing posted looks like his legs are spread WAY out. Mine are both rubbing on the snare.

An ergonomic set up is where you position the tings you use most in a comfortable and easily and accessible location.

I think that drums should be comfortably centered on your body, well within reach. 80-90% of you playing is likely kick, snare, hats/ride. Get a comfortable height and start moving things around.

It only took me 5 years to end up where I like it :)
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
So should my foundation be determined by the hi hat pedal and the bass drum pedal? Then the snare being centered?

Yeah I was too hung up on having the set facing straight and facing forward.

Yes, that is exactly the idea. This way, your whole body is straight. If your bass and toms were centered, you would be sitting twisted from the get go. As you play and move around the kit, you will be twisting your spine even more. With your feet centered, as you move around the kit, the twisting is reduced to a normal amount. Gotta protect the back. If it goes out, you don't play.
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
The drawing is total nonsense !
Everything is too far out.

Here is a pic of my kit - driver view. It's not a typical blue print but it may help. The kit is deep (deep snare and toms) and people find my cymbals are too high.

 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
The drawing is total nonsense !
Everything is too far out.

Here is a pic of my kit - driver view. It's not a typical blue print but it may help. The kit is deep (deep snare and toms) and people find my cymbals are too high.

I agree with others that your cymbals are too high (for me at least). There's a lot of real estate between snare and hats.

With that said, that's a great-looking set of Signia's! :)
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
When I don't use the twin pedal, my hihat is a bit closer, you're right. For the cymbals, yes I always put them relatively high, still I can hit the bell of the crash without raising from the stool ;-)
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
There is some good advice on this thread.
However, I think the subject of being comfortable while playing the drums and how exactly to set up your personal drum set is a subject
that can not be completely settled here on this forum. It's like trying to help someone decide exactly which pair of shoes to buy over the internet.
There are too many variables.

The only way to do it correctly is to have an experienced drummer or a drum teacher help you out, in person, with your drum set.


.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
When I don't use the twin pedal, my hihat is a bit closer, you're right. For the cymbals, yes I always put them relatively high, still I can hit the bell of the crash without raising from the stool ;-)
Hey, as long as it's comfortable for you, let it be. Drummers definitely have different levels of reach. I visit a drummer-friend from time to time, and while he's maybe 2-3 inches shorter than I am, I always feel like I'm sitting on the toilet playing his kit. You would probably feel this way if you played mine! :)
 

beeter

Senior Member
Is this why companies have made a drum rack that no one uses? It looks a lot like what an edrum kit would have but made for acoustic drum sets, I think Pearl put out one?

There is some good advice on this thread.
However, I think the subject of being comfortable while playing the drums and how exactly to set up your personal drum set is a subject
that can not be completely settled here on this forum. It's like trying to help someone decide exactly which pair of shoes to buy over the internet.
There are too many variables.

The only way to do it correctly is to have an experienced drummer or a drum teacher help you out, in person, with your drum set.


.
 

beeter

Senior Member
Could this stand work:

https://imgur.com/a/15cQHDe

I sure was able to clamp a timbale on one of its L-rod.

If you don't need that second rack tom, I'd lower that first rack town down (maybe on a separate stand), then drop and flatten your cymbals a little. This makes it super-comfortable to play. (A plate of BBQ, mac and cheese, cornbread, baked beans, and sweet tea always make me play better as well.)

YMMV.

 

beeter

Senior Member
5 hours of arranging my set and I'm still not satisfied. I'm sure those drum set rack might be of help?

Although the slightly tilted bass drum got a bit comfy compared to when it was straight and centered, the rack Toms are also tilted towards the bass drum positioning (hard to get tom 1 to sit just above the snare, I feel like I need to reach):

https://imgur.com/a/2fUMXb3

In fact, the whole set appears to be tilted now including the cymbals lol, instead of what was supposed to be just the bass drum.

The drawing posted looks like his legs are spread WAY out. Mine are both rubbing on the snare.

An ergonomic set up is where you position the tings you use most in a comfortable and easily and accessible location.

I think that drums should be comfortably centered on your body, well within reach. 80-90% of you playing is likely kick, snare, hats/ride. Get a comfortable height and start moving things around.

It only took me 5 years to end up where I like it :)
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
5 hours of arranging my set and I'm still not satisfied. I'm sure those drum set rack might be of help?

Although the slightly tilted bass drum got a bit comfy compared to when it was straight and centered, the rack Toms are also tilted towards the bass drum positioning (hard to get tom 1 to sit just above the snare, I feel like I need to reach):

https://imgur.com/a/2fUMXb3

In fact, the whole set appears to be tilted now including the cymbals lol, instead of what was supposed to be just the bass drum.
The Snare should be much closer to the bass drum rim. The 12 / 13 should be less tilted.
The curious thing is the floor tom way higher than the snare drum. - - - My 2 Euros.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Beeter
This problem you have is frustrating to me. It's like you sending me a message saying, "my shoes are not comfortable, I want to keep them, please help me".
I can't help you unless I'm there with you watching you play and walking you through how to set up your drum set so that you are comfortable playing it.
There are lots of variables involved.


.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I'm sure those drum set rack might be of help?
A rack? Come on man. Seriously.

I just posted this in the bell thread. I really hate to be redundant and repost it here, but it's pertinent and I reckon you need to see it. You're losing your way mate.


I think you should focus on actually playing and learning to use what you've already got musically.

I mean, it's good to explore and it's good to be curious. I highly encourage it and I'd hate to put you off over the long term. But you sure do have a lot of distractions on your radar mate. Every new thread is about shiny new gear, yet I can't recall a single thread or question on how to actually approach playing the instrument.

I suggest a few lessons. You need them. It's obvious by your posts. Knuckle down and learn to play what you've got. A few lessons will answer many of the questions you have about how to set up, what to hit and when to hit it.

Worry about all the peripherals later on as you progress. Later on they may well enhance what you're doing. But for now, they're nothing but distractions.
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
5 hours of arranging my set and I'm still not satisfied.
You may be making the perfect the enemy of the good. Instead of chasing a perfect setup, chase one that works.



Looking at your kit, here are my comments, some of which may be based on perspective illusions in the pic:
1. Bring your floor tom closer to your right leg.
2. Drop your floor tom so that it's head is at the same level as your snare
3. Ditch the china and the splash until you get comfortable
4. Move your crash to between your high hats and first rack tom
5. Lower your high hats
6. Move your ride cymbal so that it overlaps your floor tom by about 25%, and only slightly higher.

Watch this video...but treat it (and my suggestions) as somebody else's notions, not ideas set in stone.

If you still can't get comfortable, temporarily ditch everything except bass drum, snare and hats. When you get them working, start adding elements back in. Toms, then ride, then splash then china.
 

jimzo

Senior Member
Is this why companies have made a drum rack that no one uses? It looks a lot like what an edrum kit would have but made for acoustic drum sets, I think Pearl put out one?
5 hours of arranging my set and I'm still not satisfied. I'm sure those drum set rack might be of help?...........
A rack? Come on man. Seriously?............
The rack costing more than kit. Nothing like undermining the forum members... Think you should stop now, and work on lessons. Your teacher will 'tilt' you straight and level out your questions on posture.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
To answer your question, yes the timbale stand would work just fine if you wanted to experiment.

I think also what it's going to take is just playing. Positioning your kit will evolve over time. Can't reach something? Pull it a little closer. Feel like you T-Rex-arming something? Push it back a little. It's a lot of trial and error.

After 20+ years of playing, the way I set up now is totally different than the way it was when I first started.
 

jimb

Member
Cant help thinking ur overheads are just too big....can they be flattened and lowered?
I personally dislike having to stretch forward so my snare, BD and toms are all but touching each other and low, with cymbals tucked in low and tight...very comfortable.
 
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