How and why do drummers elevate the front of the bass drum head off the floor?

Keith Anselmo

New member
I most recently noticed or read somewhere that some drummers level or elevate the front of their bass drum off the floor so it can better met the beater when it makes contact, usually for quicker rebound, faster speed, and a square on punch of degree from pedal to head I would think?


But, what I don't understand and I've been meaning to get this question up on here for a while now, is how they actually do it? Whats the trick to this tactic? I'm sure it's no trick-of-the-trade.


Most drummers probably never even question elevating the front of the bass head off the floor, but I'm sure it's in the back of their minds, certainly.


I read a few things on doing this from; using the old wallet trick, ect.... I'm sure a plank would work just fine. In some cases I don't even see anything lifting the head up at all?!


What are some ways to perfect this technique? I think my Pedal could use a small pinch of elevation off the floor for a square on punch.
The angle at which the beater approaches the batter head will be affected by the height of the resonant side. Just keep this in mind when setting your pedal. The base plate of the pedal is going to raise the drum slightly no matter what. Personally, I like to adjust the resonant side to match the height of the batter side. Someone mentioned earlier that you don't want the drum to sit directly on the floor and I would have to agree with that. It's the same reason we try to make sure our drums are touching the least amount of things possible because it effects sustain a lot. Another reason I like to keep both sides at an equal height is because it will effect the way your beater wears down, assuming you don't use a wooden beater. The camber angle of the beater can be adjusted on some pedals but not all of them. I hope this was helpful. Great question!!!
 
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