Home studio q's

deltdrum

Senior Member
I want to put a home recording studio in my house. I would like to be able to record drums, guitars, vocs, etc... and also end up with a pretty solid result. Just to give you guys an idea, the space would be a bonus room, with soundproofed 8x8 cube shaped shed in it. The inside is lined with blankets, and I feel like I'm getting a fairly decent sound with it.

Aside from that, I basically have nothing. A couple more paychecks and I should be able to get some drum mics, but I'm not even sure if that should be my priority at this point.

I have a pretty large computer desk a few feet away from the "cube" and was kind of thinking about putting all of my computer stuff on this.

So yeah, I have a college student's budget on this one, so I'm just trying to find the most economic route on this one.

I'll try and get some pics up here in a few. Got a motocross race to get ready for haha.

Thanks guys!
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Economy? College budget? Okay, here's what you do:

1. Get yourself a Mac G4 or newer, at least 733 Mhz (you can run 32 simultaneous tracks with no slowdown...) those "older" models are fairly cheap, but run super-efficient. If you were to use a PC (not recommended), you'd have to be running about 1.8 Ghz in order to keep up with that.
2. Get yourself a ProTools Digi001 setup (I've seen the box and software being sold for $50 multiple times. It's a great little 8-ins A/D interface.)
3. Get an 8 channel mixer (or more if you want to expand later on). This will give you 8 XLR ins. Make sure you have a post-fader out for EACH channel to run to the Digi001.

...after that, it's mics and cables and stands and whatnot. Those 3 compnents will get you working with a cheap but awesome recording setup, and for fairly cheap...
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Economy? College budget? Okay, here's what you do:

1. Get yourself a Mac G4 or newer, at least 733 Mhz (you can run 32 simultaneous tracks with no slowdown...) those "older" models are fairly cheap, but run super-efficient. If you were to use a PC (not recommended), you'd have to be running about 1.8 Ghz in order to keep up with that.
2. Get yourself a ProTools Digi001 setup (I've seen the box and software being sold for $50 multiple times. It's a great little 8-ins A/D interface.)
3. Get an 8 channel mixer (or more if you want to expand later on). This will give you 8 XLR ins. Make sure you have a post-fader out for EACH channel to run to the Digi001.

...after that, it's mics and cables and stands and whatnot. Those 3 compnents will get you working with a cheap but awesome recording setup, and for fairly cheap...
Entirely agree with this if you're willing to have a stand-alone recording machine rather than a general-purpose workstation.

The G4s are great computers. If you get a G5, be very careful to make sure it's well ventilated, they run very hot so always make sure you have air circulating around it. I would actually avoid a G5 if you could because of the fan noise. We ran one in our University Studio (it's getting upgraded to a new Mac Pro but I graduate next week, just my luck!) and trying to mix with the noise a G5 puts out is difficult.

So, an old G4 (as late as possible, a 2003/4 model would be perfect) and a copy of 'Audacity' (it'll work on PowerPC Platform) with the interface Caddywumpus has suggested will get you a good way into some basic recording on a limited budget.

Just for some context, I have a five year old iMac that I use every day and the only issues it's ever had with audio is during editing. During tracking it's never been an issue and it's a perfect general-purpose computer.
 
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