Home Studio Help!

Hi Guys im going to start to build my own little home studio in the garage
I plan on getting a Zoom R16 to use so i can plug that directly into my, DAW (Cubase)
i has 8 XLRs in it so i easily have enough inputs to mic up my kit as well as the rest of my buddies stuff such as vocals guitar bass etc
I'm wondering if the garage is a good place for a studio
This is my first time recording by myself so i am a little in the dark here
I'm also curious as to which mics i should use ive found many " Drum Mic Packs" but as everyone knows a microphone is a microphone
I've been looking at this pack in particular let me know what you guys think
http://www.long-mcquade.com/products/14821/Pro_Audio_Recording/Microphones/Apex_Electronics/APEX-DP6_-_Deluxe_Drum_Pack.htm
Hope you can answer my questions Thanks!!
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
Have you even thought about sound foam yet? And where you are going to store your car since the garage is taken?
 

Arky

Platinum Member
(...) but as everyone knows a microphone is a microphone
It's hurting my eyes to read something like this... I have around 15 microphones, and yes - a microphone is a microphone (wow, who would have guessed...) BUT there are quite noticeable differences... in sound, price, polar pattern... Way to go in your learning process...

Do you think "drums are drums"? So no need to pick drums which are "better" than others, simply waste of money? Ok, you get the idea.

Except for crappy mics and provided you have some understanding of which microphone to use and how to use it - what really makes all the difference is mic position/angle/distance and stuff like that, and not whether you're using Oktava or Neumann. You can get away with affordable mics but you'll have to learn how to get the utmost out of them.
 

TNA

Senior Member
Sounds like you've got a pretty good plan. A garage isn't an ideal place to record, but I think it's better to have a larger room than a smaller room. Your theory of "a microphone is a microphone" couldn't be more wrong though. Why do you think some mics cost thousands of dollars? Why do you think there are different types of mics? Having good mics will be the difference between a good recording and a bad recording. I've never heard of that brand that you linked to. First thing I would do is get a good kick mic, your kick is the hardest to record and the hardest to get a good sound out of, so don't skimp on investing in a good mic. For everything else I'd probably recommend getting a few SM57's, or at least one for the snare, even major recording studios with huge budgets use these. Tom mics can be pricey but I'd probably again go SM57's for now, or this is where a mic pack would come in. I would not even worry about overheads probably because your cymbals will get picked up by the other mics fine. I think Shure has a pack with a couple 57's a their kick mic for $400. Try and buy used though, there is no reason to pay full retail, unless you really want new gear.
 
i dont mean a "microphone is a microphone" in the sense that all mics are the same i meant that there not really such a thing as a drum mic all mics capture and record sound it is what they do some capture lower frequencies ( kick mic) while others do well other things
 

TNA

Senior Member
i dont mean a "microphone is a microphone" in the sense that all mics are the same i meant that there not really such a thing as a drum mic all mics capture and record sound it is what they do some capture lower frequencies ( kick mic) while others do well other things
I suppose that is technically correct, but there are certainly mics that are designed to handle the high transients produced by drums better than other mics. So basically yes all mics will capture sound, but not all mics will sound good depending on what sound they are recording.
 
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