Help with Live Drum Mic technique, please

richb1

Junior Member
My duo is adding a drummer. He has a standard 5-piece kit / HH/Crash & ride.
Can someone please recommend an easy drum mic technique I can use for his kit? I have 4 channels available for him. I'm looking for specifics on placement as this is new to me. Thanks for any help.
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
You can go with 2 overheads and kick and snare mic. There's your 4 channels, the overheads will pick up the cymbals, toms and some snare, the bass mic will give you a focused "boom" and the snare mic will give you a little more presence of the snare.
 

calan

Silver Member
Also depends on the size of the rooms you're playing. If it's small, you may need to only mic the bass drum, if anything.
 

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
In most clubs, overheads are overkill - the bleed from the rest of the mics on stage is generally enough to amplify the cymbals, which I find don't usually need to amplified anyway, and that's what overheads do best, and as such really only work really well for jazz. If you're playing jazz, go for it, but I haven't played a gig where the sound guy put up overheads in a good few years now because it simply isn't necessary.

I'd put a mic on the kick, a mic on the snare, a mic between the two rack toms (assuming that's what it is) and a mic on the floor tom. Don't mic the cymbals - they're almost always plenty loud enough.
 

PHIL2016

Senior Member
I saw Steve Smith us 3 SM81s overhead and a Sure Beta 56 on the Bass Drum ( solid head, no hole) He got a really good mix out front, clean and details to a degree. not a bad choice when limited in number of mics to use...
 

moxman

Silver Member
I'd put a mic on the kick, a mic on the snare, a mic between the two rack toms (assuming that's what it is) and a mic on the floor tom. Don't mic the cymbals - they're almost always plenty loud enough.
Yeah - I use that arrangement a lot - unless it's a big club and they have their own sound guy and micing setup. Otherwise it's not worth it to lug 2 mic stands around and deal with all the hassles of cardiod /condensor mics and spillage from other stage volume. I just bring 4 decent mics (with clip-ons and a small kick mic stand), 4 XLR cables and it fits in a small bag.. not a problem. The cymbals travel by themselves and get picked up a bit by other stage mics.. minimal micing is best.

Also make sure you never position a clip-on floor tom mic with a cymbal directly above it.. it makes a perfect feedback loop when the sound bounces between the tom and cymbal!
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
In one band we use kick, snare and one carefully placed overhead - 3 channels.

In another band, same drum kit, we use 3 clip on SM57's + kick.

Both work well, 1st is hifi, clear, open.
2nd is punchy, solid, rock n' roll.
 

Skrivarna

Senior Member
Depends on type of music and style of drumming. One mic on kick and one on snare. Then one or two overheads if you want an "acoustic", full kit sound for jazz, latin, light pop or other more percussive drumming. If you are doing heavier stuff, pop or rock I'd try to find a way to use the two remaining channels for the toms. Either two mics, placed wisely, or use a splitter cable to combine two mics in one channel. Works OK if you don't have to eq each mic too much.
 
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