Help I need some good drum tab sites !

Every Site I seem to come across has little to no variety and most of the links are broken.

it shouldn't be that hard to find a drum tab for weezer's buddy holy (hey i gotta start some where)

thanks guys !
 

sabian92

Senior Member
www.ultimate-guitar.com are starting to put some on but it's very poor obviously as it's a guitar site.

I recommend you either learn how to read drum notation or learn by ear. It's not hard to do once you get the basics down, it's just learning how to do it.
 

MisterMixelpix

Silver Member
http://www.ttabs.com is all you need.

As a guy who's done music all his life (piano, guitar, flute, choral singing, now drums), I really prefer tabs for percussion. The way notation is organized is really inefficient for an instrument that has no ability to hold notes, not to mention when "chords" are notated. Yeesh.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
The way notation is organized is really inefficient for an instrument that has no ability to hold notes, not to mention when "chords" are notated. Yeesh.
Is it really more efficient to map out the entire 16th note grid for every voice for every measure of music, though? And I don't even want to ask how you're supposed to notate triplets, flams, accents etc.

I'm not sure what you mean by the chords part, but the drums do have the ability to hold notes. Some voices- like a crash cymbal - have a long sound, and you can get a long tone on the others by rolling. It's important to think in terms of long and short notes, because even if you're not playing them, they're happening in the music around you- you need to be aware of them as you create your accompaniment. It's also important to share a common rhythmic language with the other instruments, which you don't get if all your notes are just points on a 16th note grid.

GFL: You'll be much better off just working on your reading, or even learning the parts by ear. Relying on drum tablatures will just turn you into a musical cripple. At best, they're training wheels, which most kids feel ridiculous using after about age 6.
 
S

SickRick

Guest
I agree with most posters here:

1.: Tabs suck bad. Real bad. They are hard to read, limited in their options and look ugly.

2.: Learn how to read music/drumset notation.

3.: Even better: Learn how to write out songs you want to play yourself. That'll really take both your listening and playing abilitys to a whole new level.
 

joe182

Junior Member
you can try i think its 911tabs.com or google guitar tabs and some websites have drum tabs.

i personally think though buddy holly is such an easy song that you can learn it by ear. i know how to play and learned by ear and its the first song i play when i practice cause its such a good song.
 
I have VERY limited experience with tabs but I did find one the other day for a song...I have yet to sit down and compare it with the original song do who knows...songster.com. I found my song and it was totally free. The cool thing about that site is that a facsimile of the song plays while you follow along with the song. Reading music, tabs, learning by ear...why does any one of them have to be verboten? Why not use all available tools at your disposal? As long as they don't hinder your playing or cause bad habits I don't see the harm in it.
 
I just checked and Buddy Holly is indeed on that site. I can't vouch for accuracy though.

One thing I thought of though...even if drum tabs aren't accurate if you read them while listening to the original song it's easy to see when they AREN'T spot on which could be another way of learning....when drum tabs aren't accurate its easy to see the mistakes.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Reading music, tabs, learning by ear...why does any one of them have to be verboten? Why not use all available tools at your disposal? As long as they don't hinder your playing or cause bad habits I don't see the harm in it.
Why don't professional cyclists use all the tools at their disposal, and put training wheels on their bikes? Tabs are just not a professional tool. Or, they are a tool with very limited applications-- people teaching Latin or African percussion to amateurs often use them, because the rhythms are complicated, and the students are usually not sophisticated readers. To people who can read, tabs are otherwise quite useless.

People who use tabs are usually teenage rock drummers who don't want to learn songs by listening and figuring them out, and making things up where they need to-- either they think they can't do it, or they're lazy, or they're scared to get it wrong. They want the "right" answer given to them, but they also don't want to learn to read real notation. So they're not actually using all the tools at their disposal.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
To add to Todd's point, music is a language. If someone doesn't know the language, wouldn't it be better to learn it correctly before thinking about shortcuts? Just think of the language we use for texts. Would you want to learn the shortcuts before learning the actual spelling? If we write a note or letter to someone we respect (maybe a teacher or esteemed colleague), would we use:

"I will b able 2 address this at later l8r d8 after I gather more 411."

or

"I will be able to address this later date after I gather more information."

Jeff
 
Last edited:
Top