Hearing the kick drum better when playing live

Davo-London

Gold Member
Folks

Just suppose I have 2 guitarists and they don't really understand the words balanced and dynamics and I actually want to hear my own kick drum when playing live. Say I also have an Audix D6 or equivalent, what other hardware would you suggest so that I could take a headphone signal and actually hear the kick in say one ear when playing live.

I know you can get these vibrating thrones but they are rather expensive.

Davo
 

Netz Ausg

Silver Member
Do a little research on in-ear-monitors and get yourself a little mixer/monitor set.

I'm sure there must be some affordable options out there (my Shure IEMs were only about £35 - though I did have to get the pink option!).

In fact - search these forums for talk around in ear monitors - there's a wealth of info here.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I know you can get these vibrating thrones but they are rather expensive.

Davo
Yes Dave, but they're also very good, or at least the BC range ones are. Did you see the new slimmed down version on display at the LDS? I have the full blown one. There's only a few differences between the two models (no phantom power, no flight case on the cheaper version), but they both have the same power & throne top. I use mine in anything larger than a pub gig, & it's a revelation from a bass drum monitoring POV, especially in the control of dynamics. You can monitor other things through the throne too if you want. Because it works from the mic pickup, it delivers an accurate representation of the sound source, including sustain, etc.

Anyhow, if you're further interested, I know the BC people well enough to get you a direct to artist discount.
 

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bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
You can monitor other things through the throne too if you want. Because it works from the mic pickup, it delivers an accurate representation of the sound source, including sustain, etc.
One has to be careful about putting much more than the kick in the seat, as additional input - sustain in particular - can mask the kick and make it difficult to feel.

In general - thumper or not - hearing the attack of the kick is much more helpful than hearing its thump or body. Low end sounds in the ear become very mushy, and a low kick competing with a low bass guitar means you won't hear either very well. Have the EQ brightened on the kick for the monitor, and it will be much clearer in the mix.

Bermuda
 
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