Have I lost the feel for rock groove?

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Doctor Dirt

Guest
Go "Cubano Africano" its much more fun then rock N country and if you don't no what your doing just hit on the offs and smile!!! Wheres the original OP? Retired? Doc
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Go "Cubano Africano" its much more fun then rock N country and if you don't no what your doing just hit on the offs and smile!!! Wheres the original OP? Retired? Doc
Sorry guys...

My daughter needed some help... then we had diner... I'll answer the posts in a few minutes
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Well, there's a gear element for sure. Big things require big input, & because they're less articulate, a more simple input too, but that's not the crux of the matter.
Yes, agree with that Andy, and as you said, it's more than just the drums.

Because your skill & timbre palate have expanded to include many genres (read = a very good thing), a degree of fascination & value has drifted from your rock roots. Sure, you can execute the mechanics well enough, but that extra bit of pleasure is missing from key areas. It's not a playing thing, that's the easy bit, it's a performance thing, & joy translates to feel translates to performance translates to vibe, then goes full circle back to your enjoyment.
Yes, back then, when doing covers, I had sometimes technical problems with certain patterns, like ghost notes on shuffles for example, I can play these now, no problems as far as "mechanics" are concerned. It is indeed the vibes of what you play that gives you a positive (or negative) feel about your playing, when it's positive it translates to enjoyement, no matter what styles of music being played.

A drummer performing right in the pocket isn't grooving unless the whole band is in on the vibe.
You're right, is the "band" thats grooving, one off individuals playing very well amongst poor players doesn't make the music sound better, no matter the instruments.


You're fine. You've just "outgrown" the genre as a player, & therefore the fascination & youthful joy of discovery is absent. That said, this was a one time jam from a cold start. If you played that same material in a gig environment, & with a few under the belt, you'd be right back in that happy space.
Well the discovery factor is long gone as far as rock classics are concerned, but for me the fascination is still there, I'm as much, if not moore, an audiophile freak as well as a drummer, and rock music's still a big part of what I listen, though, I agree that most of my drumming these days is not related to rock, there is of course, a degree of "rock" feel within my playing as I can't denied my influences.

Perhaps you're right, If I was setting my mind, and work the "rock" chops, it would come back, but the thing that annoyed me the other day, is that I thought and believed it was still there.

I thought we were talking about rock drumming (hence my post below). What is this swing feel of which you speak? ;)
I know is bit of subject, I was just trying to help Inneedofgrace for the "swing feel" required by his band leader, he should start a thread with this question, he would get greater response from members.

Of course you may not be used to the style that was once your "first language" anymore.

But I don't believe you lost it.

What if your sense of groove and time developed, as well as your listening skills?
What if you haven't played rock better years ago, but it just sounded better in your
ears back then?
Well my listening skills are way much better than 20 years ago that's for sure, and I hope that I developed a good sense of groove and time, I certainly worked hard to try to achieve it.

Very succinctly put, & in so much more so than my post of the same theme. That mountain air's giving you clarity of thought :)
Yes, Andy, it's much clearer in my mind, and most of these posts were a moutain of fresh air as you so rightly put it.

Thank you DrummerFriends, it means a lot to me...

Cheers
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
Well my listening skills are way much better than 20 years ago that's for sure, and I hope that I developed a good sense of groove and time, I certainly worked hard to try to achieve it.
So you have the potential to actually outplay the 20-years-ago-you
instead of playing worse rock than back then! :)
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
Ouch! Lol...

FYI, I've recently become obsessed with Bonzo's drumming and vibe/sound in "Fool in the Rain". But haha I admit I also dismissed Bonham in favor of the professor Neil Peart and Rush whilst I was but a lad. He played too slow and Peart was waaay faster, hence Neil was superior :) Wow was I offbase on that one...
Actually you were right on base. :) If all you hear is a speed difference, then you might want to go back and have another listen. One of the things the Led Zeppelin Experience reaffirmed for me was that Bonham wasn't doing anything too special.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
I sure hope I never get too mature and old and stop liking Rock Music.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
So you have the potential to actually outplay the 20-years-ago-you
instead of playing worse rock than back then! :)
That's the theory at least, I realised that the vibes of what you play instantly gives a feel of your playing, good or bad, when it's bad you'll try to put it behind, but when it's good you want to remember for as long as possible... and reproduce it the next day and the next....

20 - 25 years ago, my "rock" drumming certainly gave me loads of "good feelings" while playing, so they stick to the brain for a long time, having not play in a rock band for all these years, my only comparaison was to go back to these "goods feelings" to evaluate my own playing the other day, but without the shadow of a doubt I am a better drummer today than back then.

BTW, Where you're from in Switzerland?
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I sure hope I never get too mature and old and stop liking Rock Music.
Paul Simon from "Simon & Gartfunkel" said once, "the music you liked when you were 16 or 17 years old will sticks for the rest of your life"...

So Sticks? What did you listen when you were 16.

I was listening to the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, Uriah Heep, Black Sabbath... I still like these bands today!
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Damn your superior playing!!!! ;) ;) I've now lost all sympathy for your predicament. If I hadn't taken 20 years out of the game, I'd be biting at yer ass right now!

note: usual delusion caveats apply
Don't be too hard on yourself Andy, I know you can kick butts, I saw you playing "Sunshine Of Your Love".... :))
 
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plangentmusic

Guest
It COULD be...

That you've grown and you hear more and instead of just listening to yourself, you're hearing everything as a whole. And the truth of the matter is, most jams suck.

The best rock bands are really, really rehearsed, even if they don't sound like it.
 
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