Hate drum solos

I got the pleasure of playing with a blues brother tribute group on saturday, so much fun watching those guys! Well anyway, they called a drumsolo and my excitment dropped... to me unless there is section hits or a groove to solo over its just HEY LOOK AT WHAT I CAN DO. I mostly just provided a funky groove and did more notey fills and over the barline stuff, with a little shred at the end.


Anyone else dread showing off, or am I crazy?
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
the key is to not think of it as "showing off" and to think of it as a piece of music with with melody , purpose , dynamic peaks and valleys

nothing more boring to me than a guy haphazardly throwing chops around

and nothing I love more than this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsKq3HD0EFc

that being said.....I usually hate doing them :)

much prefer a trading 4s situation
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Thats what i tried to do, sing the previous melody and jam over it, great vid!! joe is so tasty
you did the right thing brother ....its tough to have something called when you don't expect it

did you not expect it?

that can be awkward and uncomfortable in certain situations for sure
 

Herbie

Junior Member
I am a fairly new drummer and I also do not like drum solos. But i have learnt that less is more. It is better to play an intressing groove with some simple but effective fills than to try to play something really flashy without having a basic idea on where the solo is going. Recently, I was asked to perform a solo, and i ended up playing a simple beat with some nice touches, and my teacher said it sounded nice. But overall, if you are not confident with solo-ing or dont like it, then simplicity is best.
 

birks10

Senior Member
We all have opinions on the drum solo/ no drum solo-thing.... Crafting...melodic, etc, etc. I grew up playing them. i like doing them, but for me, its about selling what you've got to solo "with" to the audience. Draw them in with what you can do (no matter who your solo influences are), and sell it! Me personally, I 've spent years in the past doing the 10 to 15 minute B.R., Bonham, Baker, Bellson, solos, and now, I think, even if you've got great chops and ideas, 5 min's is tops. State your stuff, wow the audience and move on. Leave them wanting more. The drum solo can be a great highlight to the musical evening, but if you're in a band where the band is there to provide music for the dancers, your solo may or may not be welcome. Read the audience that's in front of you. Would they appreciate it? If the floor is packed with dancers and you solo, can they keep dancing or are you just driving them off the dance floor?... Or.... has your audience come to listen and enjoy your music? You're better off doing a solo under those circumstances.... Me personally, when i see/hear a drum solo, i like lot's of technique and ability that demonstrates a master at work on his (her) instrument. Not really into the "showmanship" per se. I really like playing for other drummers, don't you? You can't get away with anything in front of other drummers.

Ok.....
 

Toolate

Platinum Member
the key is to not think of it as "showing off" and to think of it as a piece of music with with melody , purpose , dynamic peaks and valleys

nothing more boring to me than a guy haphazardly throwing chops around

and nothing I love more than this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsKq3HD0EFc

that being said.....I usually hate doing them :)

much prefer a trading 4s situation
1:50! Holy shit (left hand).... going to practice...
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I don't like doing drum solos either (or watching them, for that matter), so I generally do the same thing: Build a little groove, do some fills that sound impressive to non-drummers and then lead into the song (or whatever comes next). That way I give the audience a pulse to latch on to along with a little bit of flash, and I think that's all a normal crowd really wants to hear from a drum solo.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
I find them boring to listen to, and am pretty convinced that your average audience does also (after the first 10 seconds or so) and very difficult to play.
So I admire people who can pull one off, but have no desire to do one myself.
Nor does the band we're in really work for drum solos.
There's one or two song beginnings/endings which seem suspiciously drum-soloish but they're usually nipped in the bud before I get giddy
 

wesporter

Member
I enjoy doing solos because it gives me the opportunity to express myself musical. However, the key word there is "musically". A drum solo should never just be throwing chops around haphazardly. In my band, our lead singer introduces the band on the song "Mustang Sally", and they have me solo in it. At first I was like "how do I solo over Mustang Sally" but basically all I do is play the same groove, add a little more syncopation like moving the backbeats around to the "ands" of 2&4 spiratically, at one point I go to double time for a few bars to throw is some faster flashier chops, but always I'm trying to think "melodically" and "musically" and I keep with the original 24 bar blues form of the song. Drum solos are great as long as they are musical. That's what everything we do boils down to. I doesn't matter how much chops you got, if you don't know how to play for the song, and lay down a groove and pocket that makes people feel good, then your failing, and that applies whether you're soloing OR playing in a band equally.
 

AZslim

Senior Member
I enjoy doing solos because it gives me the opportunity to express myself musical. However, the key word there is "musically". A drum solo should never just be throwing chops around haphazardly. In my band, our lead singer introduces the band on the song "Mustang Sally", and they have me solo in it. At first I was like "how do I solo over Mustang Sally" but basically all I do is play the same groove, add a little more syncopation like moving the backbeats around to the "ands" of 2&4 spiratically, at one point I go to double time for a few bars to throw is some faster flashier chops, but always I'm trying to think "melodically" and "musically" and I keep with the original 24 bar blues form of the song. Drum solos are great as long as they are musical. That's what everything we do boils down to. I doesn't matter how much chops you got, if you don't know how to play for the song, and lay down a groove and pocket that makes people feel good, then your failing, and that applies whether you're soloing OR playing in a band equally.
You are a better man than I am. Mustang Sally AND a solo! That would pretty much be my definition of drummer hell.

Good for you pulling of a nice musical solo there. I tip my hat to you, sir.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
if I had to choose between playing Mustang Sally or a swift kick in the nuts ......you would have to give me a minute to decide.

and I would most likely brace myself for the kick
 

bobacwrd

Senior Member
We all have opinions on the drum solo/ no drum solo-thing.... Crafting...melodic, etc, etc. I grew up playing them. i like doing them, but for me, its about selling what you've got to solo "with" to the audience. Draw them in with what you can do (no matter who your solo influences are), and sell it! Me personally, I 've spent years in the past doing the 10 to 15 minute B.R., Bonham, Baker, Bellson, solos, and now, I think, even if you've got great chops and ideas, 5 min's is tops. State your stuff, wow the audience and move on. Leave them wanting more. The drum solo can be a great highlight to the musical evening, but if you're in a band where the band is there to provide music for the dancers, your solo may or may not be welcome. Read the audience that's in front of you. Would they appreciate it? If the floor is packed with dancers and you solo, can they keep dancing or are you just driving them off the dance floor?... Or.... has your audience come to listen and enjoy your music? You're better off doing a solo under those circumstances.... Me personally, when i see/hear a drum solo, i like lot's of technique and ability that demonstrates a master at work on his (her) instrument. Not really into the "showmanship" per se. I really like playing for other drummers, don't you? You can't get away with anything in front of other drummers.

Ok.....

I agree with most of your points about drum solos. Something short and sweet leaving them wanting for more. When done well, a drum solo can be very well recieved if played in front of the right audience and event. If the gig is a top 40's dance gig, a solo probably isn't warranted but in front of an audience that is there to hear the band musically, then a solo may be more welcomed. I notice that most drummers that aren't technically inclined or lack the solo chops generally say "I don't like solos". Granted there are some of those few that even though they posess the technicality may still not like perfroming or listening to a solo but I have come to find in my many years of playing that those that can perform a drum solo well really like playing them. Heck, I've even seen some drummers that really have no business doing a solo playing them. Perhaps it's those types that turn off the listeners to solos. I also like the response some have said "If they are musical". What is that? If they don't carry a groove or a structured beat previously provided, or done within the context of a song they're not musical? I've seen solos performed by Rich, Calaiuta, Weckl, Greb, Paice, Bonham and countless others that weren't in the structure of a song and were more free form and highly technical that were very "musical". Try telling those guys that their solo wasn't musical. One must remember that the drums are a rhythm instrument and doesn't carry the melodic tones of guitars, horns or string instruments but drum solos can be considered very musical regardless of the context if perfromed with proficiency and taste.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
While initially I didn't care for solos, I realized that they are a necessary skill, and I have to be able to step up. I feel very naked up there, there's no support like we provide for the others, but I have made some progress. Maintaining the time is #1 (assuming the solo is not an "out of time" solo, I don't do these). I also found that I need to start out soft, with lotsa space, so I can build it. As long as the time feel marches on, space works great, with the added bonus that it gives you more time to think of stuff. The longer it takes for me to build my solo, the better it seems to work in my world. Then after I build it, I am looking for the exit. Get in, get out, nobody gets hurt.

I'm still nowhere near where I want to be, but little by little, I am defining the parts, the beginning middle and end. I feel I have a handle on the beginnings at this point, because it's easy to hold back and use space. It's an evolutionary thing, the more I do, the more relaxed I am, the easier the ideas happen, and the better I get. The more I understand that I don't have to impress anyone, the easier my solos flow out. Instead of trying to do a great solo, I try and do a passable one, and it works out better for me with less expectations. Sometimes I will have a really great start, and then one not so great idea will take the solo in a direction I would have rather avoided. I don't think I ever did one solo that I was proud of yet.
 
Top