Has anyone -------

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Viewed the Little Big Beat live studio sessions featuring Simon Phillips?

Not only some incredible playing, but the recording quality is just superb!

Am I the only one really "feeling" the analogue recording like welcoming back a lost friend?



 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Simon Phillips is the only drummer I can think of that still clings to the quintessential '80s setup'. Every available tom size, super high crashes, the whole shebang. He's the sole reason that cymbal stands are 8" taller than they need to be. :LOL:

That kit is kinda pricey too. I dunno...$20,000-25,000 before cymbals and hardware? That's almost enough for a Guru bop kit! ;)
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Amazing playing. This guy gets better with age!

One of the few players you can listen to and recognise immediately. Really lets his drums breathe.

Analogue sorts men from boys, you need to be able to nail the track with a great sound at source. Nevermind the artform that is mixing.

As much as digital has made recording accessible to the masses it's got abused to the point where the vast majority of mixes sound bland, lifeless and the human element is editted away.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Amazing playing. This guy gets better with age!

One of the few players you can listen to and recognise immediately. Really lets his drums breathe.

Analogue sorts men from boys, you need to be able to nail the track with a great sound at source. Nevermind the artform that is mixing.

As much as digital has made recording accessible to the masses it's got abused to the point where the vast majority of mixes sound bland, lifeless and the human element is editted away.
1000% agree!
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
As much as digital has made recording accessible to the masses it's got abused to the point where the vast majority of mixes sound bland, lifeless and the human element is editted away.

I can't stand the heavily 'photoshopped' drum videos out there, and the worst part is that the unwashed masses eat it up.

Videos like this...

This one is so ludicrous I can't stop laughing
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Two sets of videos in this thread. One that reminds me of why I got so hooked on music in the first place, and one that reminds me I need to find the nearest bridge to jump off!

Conversations usually go down the path of your not open minded enough, when comparing music eras. Two completely different styles, I get that, but one of them makes me feel like I’m in the pressure cooker, even if the genre is removed. Visualize the upper Simon Phillips video with the same digital and sound processing as the lower...
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I can't stand the heavily 'photoshopped' drum videos out there, and the worst part is that the unwashed masses eat it up.
Oh man they're bad, not sure which I find the funniest. You'd love to hear the source recordings, they've all been replaced with sample hits. The second one sounds like a midi keyboard drummer.

I'd have respect for this kind of music if it was actually a drummer playing it and not a software package.

Two sets of videos in this thread. One that reminds me of why I got so hooked on music in the first place, and one that reminds me I need to find the nearest bridge to jump off!
If I'm ever being tortured and they make me listen to the last 2 videos I'll tell them anything.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I feel the same way about over EQ'd drum sets as I do about Movies that are called action movies and are 90% computer and green screen. Garbage. Main reason for never buying based on online video. Nothing sounds as it should and none of it will sound that way in your studio or or home. Very misleading and never woth the effort. Fire the sound engineer. The Nick Pierce one is meaningless to me.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Note Nick Pierce where the Midi or samples or whatever are playing a roll via electronic snare but in video his left hand isn't even touching snare drum and his stick is sitting motionless while the machine rips off a wicked riff.
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I guess you could be “feeling” it. But do you really think you are “hearing” it from a youtube video that has been digitized, processed through a codec and compressed? 😁😁😁
I'm as sure as I can be that I am, or at least, I'm hearing the overall approach possibly steered by the recording process. I guess what I'm hearing are the less crystal sharp traits of digital, & maybe some of the headroom limitations of analogue.
 

BenOBrienSmith

Senior Member
Love the stuff they produce out of that studio! These Protocol vids are stellar. I really dig that the camera/editing work is simple and doesn't distract at all from the performance. They've definitely gotten some great artists in there. I feel like they were the ones to produce some of the first videos that catapulted Josh Dion into the international drummer spotlight.

Nice to see a recording studio taking advantage of some content marketing opportunities too. Of course, I'd be extremely disappointed of the recording quality was anything but superb- their primary business is recording. As far as the recording goes- are they not tracking via Pro Tools for this shoot? As far as hearing the difference even if it was tracked to tape ad converted, I doubt much (if any) of that is really coming through on YouTube with a 1080p video. I don't disagree that there's an audible difference between digital and analog when listening to the direct recording in the studio. There's also a huge difference between listening to 192kHz vs. 44.1kHz sample rates.
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Ben, screen shot from the video.

86814

Of course, via this Youtube listening medium, you're likely 100% correct, but there's still something in the reproduction that's pulling on my memory chain. I spent a ton of time in tape studio environments back in the day. When I heard these videos, something intangible came flooding back.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Tape vs. Digital Capture:
If the music, performance, & sounds are something I like & enjoy, I don't care what was used.

Sidebar:
When digital photography came on the scene (1994, Kodak/Nikon System costing $28,000), every photographer (including me) pooped all over it. Color was uncalibrated and it required a 1 meter SCSI tether to a Macintosh (costing about $12,000 with an external Syquest drive). But it was fast. And for any company producing catalogs with 1,000s of photos, it was worth it. The system could save a company hundreds of thousands of dollars in film, processing & scanning costs. Fast forward to 2007 and prices had fallen ($8,000 for a top-tier "full frame" camera), sensors had exceeded the dynamic range of film, and color management worked very well. The ability to accurately capture colors and tones has never been better. But in the audio world, "accuracy" isn't always wanted.
 

Drifter in the Dark

Silver Member
I was watching the first of Simon's videos, and my first thought was, "Wow, even the Octobans sound good!" haha! Seriously though, great stuff all around- playing and engineering.
 

BenOBrienSmith

Senior Member
Ben, screen shot from the video.
Ah, there ya go. Studer A820. Saw the mix window from Pro Tools on the main screen several times in the control room in the first vid and figured they were running all digital (not at all surprising for a session like this. Alas, a good mix is a good mix.


Analogue sorts men from boys, you need to be able to nail the track with a great sound at source.
It's sad to think that getting the a great sound at the source wouldn't be a priority regardless of the medium. Not sure why one medium would necessitate this any more than another.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
It's sad to think that getting the a great sound at the source wouldn't be a priority regardless of the medium. Not sure why one medium would necessitate this any more than another.
The answer is human tendencies. People will usually take the easy way out. It's easier to fix it in the mix if you have a piece of software rather than do it the old fashioned way when you had no other choice but to take your time.

Sadly most pop/rock/metal producers go for a mix where everything is time aligned, every note and hit is perfect and then over compressed it so it sounds amazing through P.OS. earbuds downloaded on spotify, there's no love that's gone into that, no artistic statement, it sounds bland and generic and impossible to replicate live. This maybe why a lot of music is so disposable nowadays.
 
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