Hand-Kick independence

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I honestly can't see why you wouldn't bother to learn to read simple things at least.
+100000000000000000000000000000000000


It's the obvious easy and simple fix.

Dennis don't read, Buddy didn't, but there are no "two school." If you go to school you learn how to read, because it's the universal way to learn and communicate.

Not beaing able to read is not a badge of honour. For some it's how they grew up, how one would learn a certain tradition, etc...

Just like if you learn to read, write and understand the English language all the knowledge in the libarary is then available to you, so is it also with learning to read music.

Learning to read music and count subdivision is the single best ting, especially if you're self taught, thing you can do to understand rhythm better.

There are some prodigies out there with their own way. The late Allan Holdsworth and also Chick Corea are among them, but most of the time it's just an excuse.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Sorry i do not really know how to read notations
Here, I'll help you. The "x" on the top of the staff is your hi-hat. The note 2 spaces down is your snare. The note in the bottom space is your kick.

There are 16 different exercises here, 4 per row. Don't try to read and play the whole entire thing at once. Do each one by itself until you get the feel of the beat and can do it without thinking. Then move on to the next. It's really that simple. Disregard the tempo for now, just get comfortable with it. The first one should be pretty easy, it's your basic rock beat.

As for being able to read, this is the bare minimum. You don't need to know specific notes, just drum assignments. It's like guitar tab for drummers. We just don't use numbers since we don't have frets. If you know how to use drum beat apps on your phone, you already know how to read this.
 

Alex Sanguinetti

Silver Member
Sorry i do not really know how to read notations
That was obvious from your question FROM THE START, if not you wouldn´t ask what you asked...

Don´t worry ALMOST ALL the questions at the forum are because of the same reason... (and most answers), guys might be able to read those easy rhythms posted to you but not something more complex...then they will lack in other areas or in the same one too...

The answer to your problem, is LEARN HOW TO READ FROM A TOP PLAYER... or be in the "oscurantism" for life...would be the key for all.
 

Elvis

Silver Member
So a problem for is having my kick and my hands be more independent so that I can play different kick patterns without messing up my hands. Is there any exercise I could do to improve my kick-hand independence
You could get with a teacher. Learn to read.
It won't be easy, but anything worth doing usually isn't, especially at the beginning.
Anyway, show them what you do know, at first, so they have an idea of where you're at, then you guys can proceed from there.
If you're just looking to "conquer" a certain song or album, let the teacher know about that and that will help them concentrate the session(s) on things that are most beneficial to you.
This doesn't have to be something that will take up the majority of your life. It could just be a few sessions, or a series of short sessions (like 3-4 every couple of months).
Talk to them about it, see where it goes.


Elvis
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I never work on independence. Never have (that I can remember). What I HAVE done is learn songs. Lots of them. Independence came naturally while learning different songs.

Find songs you want to learn, and work on short phrases at a time. Start slow and pick up speed.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I never work on independence. Never have (that I can remember). What I HAVE done is learn songs. Lots of them. Independence came naturally while learning different songs.

Find songs you want to learn, and work on short phrases at a time. Start slow and pick up speed.
Thats the path I took, and having done it, disagree for any new drummer.

Two people had to get to the opposite side of a track.
One had to run a set of hurdles through the field, from one side of the track to the other. He eventually got to the other side, but fell on quite a few hurdles, and it took him longer. Now he can jump any hurdle.
The second guy did not cut through the field where the hurdles were, but took the long way across the track, running on the smooth open path. He got to the other side of the track, but will never know how to jump hurdles.

Follow teachers advice on here - Learn to read, learn the exercises.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Thats the path I took, and having done it, disagree for any new drummer.

Two people had to get to the opposite side of a track.
One had to run a set of hurdles through the field, from one side of the track to the other. He eventually got to the other side, but fell on quite a few hurdles, and it took him longer. Now he can jump any hurdle.
The second guy did not cut through the field where the hurdles were, but took the long way across the track, running on the smooth open path. He got to the other side of the track, but will never know how to jump hurdles.

Follow teachers advice on here - Learn to read, learn the exercises.

I was born without access to a track.

I did the best I could with the cards I was dealt. My advice is probably not the best.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Seriously, I recommend giving my Polynesian Nightmare-inspired exercise a try.

Flan, rest.

Flan, rest.

Flan, rest.
 

benthedrum

Senior Member
I was born without access to a track.

I did the best I could with the cards I was dealt. My advice is probably not the best.
It doesn't have to be the "best advice".

It's YOUR advice.

That's the most important thing.

Sometimes unorthodox perspectives is what the world needs.

I reckon playing to samba ostinatos is the best musical way for hand/kick Independence
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I was born without access to a track.

I did the best I could with the cards I was dealt. My advice is probably not the best.
That makes two of us. I'm self taught, with all the shortcomings that brings.
Don't get me wrong, I am a great fan of playing to songs as a learning tool, but given endless internet resources nowadays, there is lots of help for everybody. I think today's students never had it so good, yet many want the quick fix.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I think the "this is what I did, so it's the only right way to do things," is the most dangerous attitude one can have as any type of educator.

Reading or not reading is not a real debate. The order of things can be discussed, but reality is that starting with not reading is way more demanding. I'd even do that myself if possible, but in very few cases is it recommended to go ahead without visuals. It's either with very young kids that aren't ready or someone who takes to that learning modality much more naturally.

Now, if I could work with a student an hour or two almost every day I'd certainly go way more heavy into doing things by ear, but that's not reality. Very few people can afford that, very few students have the patience required and the public music schools I work in certainly don't provide for it. I try to make up for it by mostly doing things by ear and memory when we do group based stuff.

I'd say the less naturally gifted someone is the more help learning to read and count properly will be.

I'm also not educating just players, but the teachers of the future. They should have many options available, not just what they think worked best for them.
 
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Elvis

Silver Member
To the OP - go learn to read charts.

Take care.
...and to that end, once you learn to read, you can learn from the plethora of books out there that can help you.
You can even take "snare drumming books" and transpose the charts from hand-hand to hand-foot patterns.
I've heard from a bunch of people in the past, who transposed "Stick Control" into hand-foot patterns to help with their independence.


Elvis
 
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