Gretsch drum shells- Steve Maxwell video

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Interesting so if you get USA custom you get the 6 ply maple gum wood shells with silver sealer similar to 50-60s era and the Brooklyn more like the original 3 ply shells? I've spent more time on a Brady kit (which was just for one day) than I have any Gretsch kit :( I need to experience that Great Gretsch Sound it seems.
 

BertTheDrummer

Gold Member
Interesting. Thanks for thinking of the old man. Steve is the man.
I agree! I watched a clinic he did talking about drum tuning recently. I was so interesting with so much info, but it was almost anti what everyone else teaches. However, all the drums on all his stuff sounds so good that I think I was thinking I need to try some of his techniques out.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I agree! I watched a clinic he did talking about drum tuning recently. I was so interesting with so much info, but it was almost anti what everyone else teaches. However, all the drums on all his stuff sounds so good that I think I was thinking I need to try some of his techniques out.
What was he saying about drum tuning?
 

BertTheDrummer

Gold Member
What was he saying about drum tuning?
He's very much Batter higher than Reso, even on the snare. The concept is around the idea that the top is for pitch and the bottom is for resonance. He doesn't tune to equal, but like half a turn higher on the top. He tunes by ear and by feel. He talks about tuning the bottom like 1 turn, and the top 1.5 turns. Coated Ambassadors over Coated or Clear Ambassadors on everything.

Of course he admits that all his methods come from pre-close miking days and is designed more for getting good sounds out in an acoustic environment and every acoustic environment. He talks about dialing in the drum for what it does, and to project the sound it has, then learning how to adjust it basically depending on the gig environment.

He says that the common method of tuning the bottom heads higher, is okay for close miking but acoustically it is just pushing all your sound to your head. However, he said the sound is going to your head, but not to the audience so to paraphrase him, he basically said you think you are killin' it and it looks like you are killin' it because all of the sound is getting to you but the audience can't hear a thing.

He also talks about having the top head higher because of feel as well, because you get more rebound so you are not having to do as much work.

Though honestly the #1 thing he said in the whole thing that is applicable to everyone was probably just simply making sure you have the right drum for the right gig. Or basically, if you are in a Zep cover band don't try and tune your 10/12/14/20 kit so low to do those sounds.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Interesting so if you get USA custom you get the 6 ply maple gum wood shells with silver sealer similar to 50-60s era and the Brooklyn more like the original 3 ply shells? I've spent more time on a Brady kit (which was just for one day) than I have any Gretsch kit :( I need to experience that Great Gretsch Sound it seems.
Brooklyn is 6-ply Maple/Poplar. The Broadcaster is 3-ply Maple/Gum.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Broadcaster is 3-ply Maple/Poplar I think actually. I think Maple/Gum is only in the USA Custom.
From the Gretsch website


Broadkaster shells are made with a North American maple/poplar/maple formula.

USA customs
At the heart of each drum is the legendary 6-ply Gretsch-formula maple/gum shell
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
...and note the spelling of BroadKaster
Now, not only Will Gretsch not ever put me on their endorser list, but sending a couple of tough guys over to take away my Brooklyns! Two failures in one post! Guess you can’t fix stupid, even if it’s yourself. I think I’ll light my stick on fire and go take a nap now. Thanks Grunt! 8-P
 
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