Going maple on my next...

M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
I dunno, man. My problem seems to be that whatever kit I get, whatever woods, whatever heads, is that I always end up sounding like how I always sound. Maybe I have this built-in tuning ability for a certain sound and I don't know how to tune any differently to get a different sound. But I've had acrylic, maple, birch, bubinga, oak,...etc.,...every recording I make sounds the same. I guess this isn't a bad problem to have, it even makes choosing a kit easy - I just get something I like and roll with it 'til my eye catches on to something else.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
interior bearing rings or ?Re-rings? what do they do?
45 degree vs. round bearing edge... i assume i will get a fatter sound?

Re-rings or reinforcement rings were installed to help support the drum shell and maintain its roundness. In general the older vintage kits were made out of softer woods (mahogany) and had thin shells and benefitted from re-rings. As drum shell manufacturing progressed shells were made stronger and thicker and the need for re-rings went away.

Usually vintage drum shells with re-rings had rounded over bearing edges. Rounded bearing edges provide more contact between the drum head and the wood drum shell. I guess you could say it creates a “fatter sound”. The sound includes more tone produced by the wood shell. And less sustain.
The sharper edge produces a longer sustain and is more dependent on the drum head for its tone. Someone else on this forum might be able to add more information on this.

Ludwig makes a new drum set with full rounded over bearing edges. It produces a more vintage sound. It is called the Club Date kit. If I were you I would get a maple drum kit with different bearing edges than what you have on your DWs. The point I was making earlier was: if you get another drum kit made out of maple and it has the same shell thickness and the same bearing edges (and same drum heads) as your current DW birch kit; I think the maple kit will sound very similar to your DW kit. At least that has been my experience with birch and maple.



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calan

Silver Member
I dunno, man. My problem seems to be that whatever kit I get, whatever woods, whatever heads, is that I always end up sounding like how I always sound. Maybe I have this built-in tuning ability for a certain sound and I don't know how to tune any differently to get a different sound. But I've had acrylic, maple, birch, bubinga, oak,...etc.,...every recording I make sounds the same. I guess this isn't a bad problem to have, it even makes choosing a kit easy - I just get something I like and roll with it 'til my eye catches on to something else.
Same. Moreover, when I hop on a random kit at a jam, it's usually the same result. I say usually, because if the heads are all dented in, taped up, really poorly tuned, or any combination of the above, then results may vary.

But on any decently tuned set, I pretty much sound like me.
 

v.zarate

Gold Member
Re-rings or reinforcement rings were installed to help support the drum shell and maintain its roundness. In general the older vintage kits were made out of softer woods (mahogany) and had thin shells and benefitted from re-rings. As drum shell manufacturing progressed shells were made stronger and thicker and the need for re-rings went away.

Usually vintage drum shells with re-rings had rounded over bearing edges. Rounded bearing edges provide more contact between the drum head and the wood drum shell. I guess you could say it creates a “fatter sound”. The sound includes more tone produced by the wood shell. And less sustain.
The sharper edge produces a longer sustain and is more dependent on the drum head for its tone. Someone else on this forum might be able to add more information on this.

Ludwig makes a new drum set with full rounded over bearing edges. It produces a more vintage sound. It is called the Club Date kit. If I were you I would get a maple drum kit with different bearing edges than what you have on your DWs. The point I was making earlier was: if you get another drum kit made out of maple and it has the same shell thickness and the same bearing edges (and same drum heads) as your current DW birch kit; I think the maple kit will sound very similar to your DW kit. At least that has been my experience with birch and maple.



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very useful information! thank you. ill try to find a maple kit around here with a round bearing edge on it to test spin.

i have noticed older DW maple kits do have the rings in them. ?keller shell kits?

this DW kit is only half birch and the other half is bamboo. it also has a sharp 45 degree bearing edge. very thin shells but strong. bamboo is no joke.
 

v.zarate

Gold Member
I dunno, man. My problem seems to be that whatever kit I get, whatever woods, whatever heads, is that I always end up sounding like how I always sound. Maybe I have this built-in tuning ability for a certain sound and I don't know how to tune any differently to get a different sound. But I've had acrylic, maple, birch, bubinga, oak,...etc.,...every recording I make sounds the same. I guess this isn't a bad problem to have, it even makes choosing a kit easy - I just get something I like and roll with it 'til my eye catches on to something else.
Same. Moreover, when I hop on a random kit at a jam, it's usually the same result. I say usually, because if the heads are all dented in, taped up, really poorly tuned, or any combination of the above, then results may vary.

But on any decently tuned set, I pretty much sound like me.
i may too but i dont know truely since the maple kits ive played on were not tuned by me and some were not tuned right. i also did not feel right messing around with someone else kit without permission or worse tuning it in front of them making them think they suck at it.
 

Smoke

Silver Member
I dunno, man. My problem seems to be that whatever kit I get, whatever woods, whatever heads, is that I always end up sounding like how I always sound.
Saw an interview with Les Paul - he said pretty much the same thing. He would pick up any junker guitar, plug it into an amp, tweak a few of the knobby things and it would sound just like a Les Paul.

Nothing wrong with sounding like "You!"
 
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