Gig Questions.

BabyBob

Silver Member
all great advice Larry as always

your post got me thinking and I just realized that in nearly 25 years of gigging I have never broken a drum head on my own kit while playing live.......not that I can recall anyway

only time I can recall was on the house kit at the Continental in NYC where the rack tom head was already slightly split so I purposely helped finish the job

other than that ...never....Im actually kind of surprised myself sitting here thinking about it

Ive broken many sticks and even cymbals....but never a head

plenty broken heads practicing....either alone or with a band.....but never in front of an audience

...anyway back to the topic....

a gig rug for sure ....nothing worse than a traveling kick drum ...be sure its big enough for the kick your throne and the hat stand...because if your weight from sitting on the throne is not on the rug it will still travel
a drum key
I always bring a little flash light and a sharpie, some gaff tape, cymbal felts because when you drop them in the dark they are gone.....
I always bring a towel and extra bottles of water
Towel and gaff tape? o_O What's the tape used for?
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
Agree with what everyone on here has said, but wanted to point out that when you start gigging and/or moving your kit around more, a rug that has markings saves you a ton of time setting up... If you have everything set up on your rug at your practice space and everything is in perfect position, just go around your kit and put tape makers on your rug... If you have memory locks on all your stands etc, just lay the rug down at any venue and place everything on the tape markers... i take my rug everywhere I go and use it even if there is already a rug there... Saves a lot of time on setup!
Ah I see so that's why someone mention the gaff tape. I see, thanks!

On my rug I used a "paint sharpie" (it's like a magic marker but has paint in it) to outline
where the legs of stands go etc, instead of tape. It saves a lot of time setting up.
Paint sharpie? Hmm gonna look out for that. Thank you for pointing out!
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Towel and gaff tape? o_O What's the tape used for?
towel to wipe my face between songs ..... lights are hot and drumming often makes us sweat

tape for.....well you never know....I always seem to need it or get asked by someone else if I have any
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
My approach to these questions is:

Either use cases, or tear them down to the very minimum required to get them in the car and carry them around. I use tufflite boxes for gigs where I need to carry them a long ways in, up stairs, etc. My favorite gigs are where I take the cymbals off, stand everything up in my minivan ready to play, and unload to a nearby stage. I went years without cases, but you will need a case for cymbals and hardware. Golf bags on wheels work great for stands.

You need to bring a rug, always. Sometimes it will stay in the car, but you don't want to be the drummer that scratched up a wood or tile floor. The entrance way type of rugs work well, and are reasonable at hardware stores. Mearure your kit when it's set up, your throne doesn't have to be on it but it helps prevent creeping.

Never let people borrow your cymbals. Be very clear to the other players about this.
 

groove1

Silver Member
I have a small kit and it takes me 2 trips to get everything into where we are playing and 2
to get it all back to the vehicle. I always take my cymbal bag in last and take it to my vehicle
first when the gig is over (never leaving the cymbals out of my site). They are the
high value items in my kit that could be easily stolen.

In the 1960's I was sharing a stage with 2 other drummers who used my kit and cymbals.
When one band was finished playing the drummer removed my ride cymbal and made for
the exit door with it. There were about 2,000 in the audience but I had been watching him the
whole time and was right on top of him and got the cymbal back. It's rare but you never know.
 
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BabyBob

Silver Member
My approach to these questions is:

Either use cases, or tear them down to the very minimum required to get them in the car and carry them around. I use tufflite boxes for gigs where I need to carry them a long ways in, up stairs, etc. My favorite gigs are where I take the cymbals off, stand everything up in my minivan ready to play, and unload to a nearby stage. I went years without cases, but you will need a case for cymbals and hardware. Golf bags on wheels work great for stands.

You need to bring a rug, always. Sometimes it will stay in the car, but you don't want to be the drummer that scratched up a wood or tile floor. The entrance way type of rugs work well, and are reasonable at hardware stores. Mearure your kit when it's set up, your throne doesn't have to be on it but it helps prevent creeping.

Never let people borrow your cymbals. Be very clear to the other players about this.
Thanks for the advice.
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
I have a small kit and it takes me 2 trips to get everything into where we are playing and 2
to get it all back to the vehicle. I always take my cymbal bag in last and take it to my vehicle
first when the gig is over (never leaving the cymbals out of my site). They are the
high value items in my kit that could be easily stolen.

In the 1960's I was sharing a stage with 2 other drummers who used my kit and cymbals.
When one band was finished playing the drummer removed my ride cymbal and made for
the exit door with it. There were about 2,000 in the audience but I had been watching him the
whole time and was right on top of him and got the cymbal back. It's rare but you never know.
Alright, got it...cymbals are top priority...
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Even though you may know these other drummers as "friends",treat them as aquaintences,and you'll keep your gear longer.Everybody has a different standard on how we treat our own instrument,let alone how we treat someone elses.

That being said,have all the other drummers bring their own sticks,cymbals,pedal,and snare drum.This way if one of those items breaks,the show can still go on,and everybody can still stay "friends"..

I have found over the years,that out of all the musicians I know,that I would only let a handful,either use or borrow my gear.Its a rule that served me well,and has helped me avoid the usual horror stories that come with being too nieve and generous with my drums.

Good luck,and don't forget the rug,and remember Murphys Law(what can go wrong,will go wrong,at the worst possible time.):)

Steve B
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
Even though you may know these other drummers as "friends",treat them as aquaintences,and you'll keep your gear longer.Everybody has a different standard on how we treat our own instrument,let alone how we treat someone elses.

That being said,have all the other drummers bring their own sticks,cymbals,pedal,and snare drum.This way if one of those items breaks,the show can still go on,and everybody can still stay "friends"..

I have found over the years,that out of all the musicians I know,that I would only let a handful,either use or borrow my gear.Its a rule that served me well,and has helped me avoid the usual horror stories that come with being too nieve and generous with my drums.

Good luck,and don't forget the rug,and remember Murphys Law(what can go wrong,will go wrong,at the worst possible time.):)

Steve B
Okay will take note, Thanks.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Kinda late to the party but I'll throw in my two cents worth...

1. How shall I transport my set to the location? Shall I dismantle everything? (I don't have any drum cases so the drums will most probably be sitting in the back seats. )

I don't use cases. I lay all my hardware on the floor behind the seats. On the backseat goes the floor tom laying on the side, then snare in the middle, 13" tom goes next to snare. In the back (or trunk) goes the seat, cymbal bag, pedal and stick bag. I put the bass drum in the front seat and strap it in with the seat belt so that it doesn't move around and scratch the dash and glove compartment door.

2. Do I really need a drum rug? My drum room is carpeted(The ones like in offices) that's why I never use a rug before. If I need one what size shall I need? Will a bed sheet do the job? heheh

You do need a rug. I always have to borrow one. Last time was great. It was probably 4'x6' and very lightweight. Probably made of nylon or something.

3. Other bands are gonna use my drum set too, should I charge them? I know this sounds werid...but if I need to how much should I charge 'em?

Some drummers tend to be pretty anal about their equipment. experienced players you don't have to worry so much about. Several drummers play the set at our studio and they are good Paiste Signature cymbals. They are still doing fine and nobody worries too much because there always is this understanding that we all have that you gotta replace what you cracked or broke. The Pedal is DW9000, as is the HH stand. It's great stuff...never breaks hardly ever. It's that cheapo equipment that you have to worry about. I mean, I don't know what your playing, but I'm just saying, you know?
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
Kinda late to the party but I'll throw in my two cents worth...

1. How shall I transport my set to the location? Shall I dismantle everything? (I don't have any drum cases so the drums will most probably be sitting in the back seats. )

I don't use cases. I lay all my hardware on the floor behind the seats. On the backseat goes the floor tom laying on the side, then snare in the middle, 13" tom goes next to snare. In the back (or trunk) goes the seat, cymbal bag, pedal and stick bag. I put the bass drum in the front seat and strap it in with the seat belt so that it doesn't move around and scratch the dash and glove compartment door.

2. Do I really need a drum rug? My drum room is carpeted(The ones like in offices) that's why I never use a rug before. If I need one what size shall I need? Will a bed sheet do the job? heheh

You do need a rug. I always have to borrow one. Last time was great. It was probably 4'x6' and very lightweight. Probably made of nylon or something.

3. Other bands are gonna use my drum set too, should I charge them? I know this sounds werid...but if I need to how much should I charge 'em?

Some drummers tend to be pretty anal about their equipment. experienced players you don't have to worry so much about. Several drummers play the set at our studio and they are good Paiste Signature cymbals. They are still doing fine and nobody worries too much because there always is this understanding that we all have that you gotta replace what you cracked or broke. The Pedal is DW9000, as is the HH stand. It's great stuff...never breaks hardly ever. It's that cheapo equipment that you have to worry about. I mean, I don't know what your playing, but I'm just saying, you know?
Thanks for the advice :)
 
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