Gig Questions.

BabyBob

Silver Member
Hi guys and girls of DW forums,

I've got a few question regarding gigs (Not a question about nervousness)

1. How shall I transport my set to the location? Shall I dismantle everything? (I don't have any drum cases so the drums will most probably be sitting in the back seats. )

2. Do I really need a drum rug? My drum room is carpeted(The ones like in offices) that's why I never use a rug before. If I need one what size shall I need? Will a bed sheet do the job? heheh

3. Other bands are gonna use my drum set too, should I charge them? I know this sounds werid...but if I need to how much should I charge 'em?

That's all I got for now.

Reply Soon,
BB.
 
Last edited:

Numberless

Platinum Member
1) Transporting them in a car or van is the usual, I recommend you get cases for them ASAP.

2) You might not need to depending on the venue but it's a good idea to have one with you (it's a good idea to always have stuff you might need like tuning keys, extra heads, extra sticks).

3) It's not common to charge the other bands for using the drums, at least here. Usually an agreement will be made by all the drummers sharing the kit, in which they're told what equipment they should bring. Most of the time the bass drum and toms are provided, drummers bring their snare, pedal, cymbals and hardware.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
1. How shall I transport my set to the location? Shall I dismantle everything? (I don't have any drum cases so the drums will most probably be sitting in the back seats. )
I highly recommend you get bags if you're going to be gigging. Right now though, just break it down to where you can transport it easily; there are no rules for this. Just make sure everything's protected so that you don't scratch your drums, and also make sure that it's secured to the point that you won't get buried under a pile of drums and hardware if you get into an accident (or just have to brake hard).


2. Do I really need a drum rug? My drum room is carpeted that's why I never use a rug before. If I need one what size shall I need? Will a bed sheet do the job? heheh
I always bring a rug. If you don't have one and the stage floor is slippery, you might end up having to chase your kick drum around the room as you're playing. The spikes on the kick drum help out a little bit, but it can still move. Also, the venue may have a nice floor which will be ruined by the spikes.


3. Other bands are gonna use my drum set too, should I charge them? I know this sounds werid...but if I need to how much should I charge 'em?
That's up to you, but it's pretty uncommon to do so. However, you need to make sure they know that if something is broken, they're responsible for it. Whenever other drummers use my kit at gigs, I tell them they definitely can't use my sticks or cymbals, and that I'd prefer them to also bring their own snare, stool and pedal if they can.
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
1) Transporting them in a car or van is the usual, I recommend you get cases for them ASAP.

2) You might not need to depending on the venue but it's a good idea to have one with you (it's a good idea to always have stuff you might need like tuning keys, extra heads, extra sticks).

3) It's not common to charge the other bands for using the drums, at least here. Usually an agreement will be made by all the drummers sharing the kit, in which they're told what equipment they should bring. Most of the time the bass drum and toms are provided, drummers bring their snare, pedal, cymbals and hardware.
Hey thanks for your quick reply ;)

1) What cases do you recommend? I need something light...

2) What kind of venue needs a rug and what kind doesn't?

3) I see, alright will try to make an agreement with the other drummers.
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
I highly recommend you get bags if you're going to be gigging. Right now though, just break it down to where you can transport it easily; there are no rules for this. Just make sure everything's protected so that you don't scratch your drums, and also make sure that it's secured to the point that you won't get buried under a pile of drums and hardware if you get into an accident (or just have to brake hard).



I always bring a rug. If you don't have one and the stage floor is slippery, you might end up having to chase your kick drum around the room as you're playing. The spikes on the kick drum help out a little bit, but it can still move. Also, the venue may have a nice floor which will be ruined by the spikes.



That's up to you, but it's pretty uncommon to do so. However, you need to make sure they know that if something is broken, they're responsible for it. Whenever other drummers use my kit at gigs, I tell them they definitely can't use my sticks or cymbals, and that I'd prefer them to also bring their own snare, stool and pedal if they can.
Hmm...I see.

I think I'd ask the other drummers to bring their cymbals(they can use mine but like you said "if something is broken, they're responsible for it"), sticks,pedal and maybe throne and one of them to bring a drum rug as I don't have one. What do you recon?
 

Toolate

Platinum Member
Any thick rug will do- best way to go inmy opinion would be a rubber backed door mat that is at least big enough to be under your throne, the kick, hi hat base and ride stand base. Your weight sitting on the seat will keep the rug in place and whole kit from sliding all over..

Get some soft cases (they are cheap and very light).

Sounds like this is your first gig?

I would practice setting your kit up if your are going to have to do it quickly by yourself. Also, think about what you are taking- might want to evaluate what you want to have there and who might be playing it before taking all of your best stuff. Some gig environments and players are very rough. Not sure where you are headed but you seem too nice to let go without a little warning. Sorry if this is all unneccessary.
 

Netz Ausg

Silver Member
1) What cases do you recommend? I need something light...

2) What kind of venue needs a rug and what kind doesn't?

3) I see, alright will try to make an agreement with the other drummers.
1) Any soft cases will do. Don't worry about getting branded ones, as a bog standard case will suffice for reasonably regular gigging. As long as it's a little padded and you're not juggling the drums on the way in to the venue you'll be fine. Get a decent sized duffle bag for the small/medium hardware pieces - when giging more regularly in the future worry about getting a larger hardware bag for cymbal stands etc too.

2) Assume that EVERY venue needs a rug. I take my Pro Rocket mat with me to every gig, and leave it in the car if it's not needed. I got a PR mat as the bit of carpet I used to use didn't have a rubber backing (and I couldn't find a suitably sized mat with a rubber back otherwise, so I went PR despite the price) and I had a rather embarrassing gig 2 months ago where the mat kept moving around on a particularly slippery stage.

I've played a few gigs where the stage is carpetted since I got it, but I was glad I had the mat in the car in case they weren't. Seriously - never leave home without the mat.

3) With gigs where you're supplying the kit always be the one to make the effort to communicate - it's your gear that's on the line. Don't assume the other drummers will bother to get hold of you. At the very same gig mentioned above the drummer who came in the support act only brought his sticks and snare. I would have sorted something before hand but the bar manager hadn't told us there'd be a support act. Needless to say - I sent him home to get his cymbals.

If you're dealing with a drummer who hasn't got cymbals for some reason and isn't able to source any for the gig - make it VERY clear that you'll inspect the cymbals with him/her before hand (so it's up front about pre-existing condition) and afterward with them too. Any new signs of wear or damage will be chargable to that individual - this should be agreed before hand. If you see them thrashing your stuff in their set don't be afraid to let them know to chill and stop laying in to it - even if you have to jump on stage and tell them during the show. It's your expensive gear, after all.

Just my 2 cents.
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
I don't know where you live, but I bought a set of Alligator soft drum bags on sale for only $99 and they have worked fantastic for many years. I actually prefer them over hard cases, but then again I don't go on tour either and only gig once a month or so.

I always bring my rubber backed area rug with me. Last year I bought one that matched the color of my kit. I think it was only $30 or so.

I've never had other bands use my drums at gigs, so I don't know what the protocol is there. I've had other drummers sit in for me for a few songs at gigs, but that's about it.
 

jornthedrummer

Silver Member
I have seen soft cases at JS Music on Jalan Imbi in KL.

If you only gig once in a while a bit of care and a couple of blankets will do.

A rug is essential as many floors is tiled here in Malaysia.
Alternatively you can connect your drum stool and bass drum with a piece of string. This methode has the disadvantage that the distance between your stool and bass drum is fixed. Sometimes its nice to be able to adjust a bit.


thx

jorn

http://jsmusic.com.my/jsmusic/Product_drum.php
 

double_G

Silver Member
dont sweat it. bring a blanket & wrap up the toms. put the BD in the backseat. pile hardware in trunk. get cases as soon as you can. just got 5 more Drumseeker (Humes & Berg) cases for my Yamaha kit. great stuff.

i use home depot rugs - every 3-5 years & get a 6 x 6 swath of their black (cheap) carpet. it looks like car rug. they get ruined from spills or rain (had to leave on in the dumpster one gig when the show was cancelled 1/2 way thru from monsoon rain) & i just buy new ones.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Forget the sheet, it would be worse than useless. Get a rug big enough so your bass drum and throne are on it. Bare minimum. Bigger is better. 5 feet x 6 feet is the largest you should need. Cases are not necessary at this stage in the game, you could skip them for this gig, unless you have the cash, then yea why not?. ALWAYS carry a rug to a gig, a spare pedal, spare snare, place extra sticks where you can grab them in case you drop them while playing. Don't forget a drum key, duct tape, and always remember to BRING A SPARE KICK DRUM HEAD! If that breaks you're hosed.

In the US I've never seen drummers having to pay to share a kit. Don't know the protocol in Malaysia.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Forget the sheet, it would be worse than useless. Get a rug big enough so your bass drum and throne are on it. Bare minimum. Bigger is better. 5 feet x 6 feet is the largest you should need. Cases are not necessary at this stage in the game, you could skip them for this gig, unless you have the cash, then yea why not?. ALWAYS carry a rug to a gig, a spare pedal, spare snare, place extra sticks where you can grab them in case you drop them while playing. Don't forget a drum key, duct tape, and always remember to BRING A SPARE KICK DRUM HEAD! If that breaks you're hosed.

In the US I've never seen drummers having to pay to share a kit. Don't know the protocol in Malaysia.

all great advice Larry as always

your post got me thinking and I just realized that in nearly 25 years of gigging I have never broken a drum head on my own kit while playing live.......not that I can recall anyway

only time I can recall was on the house kit at the Continental in NYC where the rack tom head was already slightly split so I purposely helped finish the job

other than that ...never....Im actually kind of surprised myself sitting here thinking about it

Ive broken many sticks and even cymbals....but never a head

plenty broken heads practicing....either alone or with a band.....but never in front of an audience

...anyway back to the topic....

a gig rug for sure ....nothing worse than a traveling kick drum ...be sure its big enough for the kick your throne and the hat stand...because if your weight from sitting on the throne is not on the rug it will still travel
a drum key
I always bring a little flash light and a sharpie, some gaff tape, cymbal felts because when you drop them in the dark they are gone.....
I always bring a towel and extra bottles of water
 

DumDrum

Member
Agree with what everyone on here has said, but wanted to point out that when you start gigging and/or moving your kit around more, a rug that has markings saves you a ton of time setting up... If you have everything set up on your rug at your practice space and everything is in perfect position, just go around your kit and put tape makers on your rug... If you have memory locks on all your stands etc, just lay the rug down at any venue and place everything on the tape markers... i take my rug everywhere I go and use it even if there is already a rug there... Saves a lot of time on setup!
 

groove1

Silver Member
On my rug I used a "paint sharpie" (it's like a magic marker but has paint in it) to outline
where the legs of stands go etc, instead of tape. It saves a lot of time setting up.
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
Any thick rug will do- best way to go inmy opinion would be a rubber backed door mat that is at least big enough to be under your throne, the kick, hi hat base and ride stand base. Your weight sitting on the seat will keep the rug in place and whole kit from sliding all over..

Get some soft cases (they are cheap and very light).

Sounds like this is your first gig?

I would practice setting your kit up if your are going to have to do it quickly by yourself. Also, think about what you are taking- might want to evaluate what you want to have there and who might be playing it before taking all of your best stuff. Some gig environments and players are very rough. Not sure where you are headed but you seem too nice to let go without a little warning. Sorry if this is all unneccessary.
I see, Setting up my kit should be no prob...but fine tuning it maybe a problem...

Most of the drummers that is gonna use my kit are my friends so I doubt they would be that rough...lol
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
1) Any soft cases will do. Don't worry about getting branded ones, as a bog standard case will suffice for reasonably regular gigging. As long as it's a little padded and you're not juggling the drums on the way in to the venue you'll be fine. Get a decent sized duffle bag for the small/medium hardware pieces - when giging more regularly in the future worry about getting a larger hardware bag for cymbal stands etc too.

2) Assume that EVERY venue needs a rug. I take my Pro Rocket mat with me to every gig, and leave it in the car if it's not needed. I got a PR mat as the bit of carpet I used to use didn't have a rubber backing (and I couldn't find a suitably sized mat with a rubber back otherwise, so I went PR despite the price) and I had a rather embarrassing gig 2 months ago where the mat kept moving around on a particularly slippery stage.

I've played a few gigs where the stage is carpetted since I got it, but I was glad I had the mat in the car in case they weren't. Seriously - never leave home without the mat.

3) With gigs where you're supplying the kit always be the one to make the effort to communicate - it's your gear that's on the line. Don't assume the other drummers will bother to get hold of you. At the very same gig mentioned above the drummer who came in the support act only brought his sticks and snare. I would have sorted something before hand but the bar manager hadn't told us there'd be a support act. Needless to say - I sent him home to get his cymbals.

If you're dealing with a drummer who hasn't got cymbals for some reason and isn't able to source any for the gig - make it VERY clear that you'll inspect the cymbals with him/her before hand (so it's up front about pre-existing condition) and afterward with them too. Any new signs of wear or damage will be chargable to that individual - this should be agreed before hand. If you see them thrashing your stuff in their set don't be afraid to let them know to chill and stop laying in to it - even if you have to jump on stage and tell them during the show. It's your expensive gear, after all.

Just my 2 cents.
Good advice, thanks.

I don't know where you live, but I bought a set of Alligator soft drum bags on sale for only $99 and they have worked fantastic for many years. I actually prefer them over hard cases, but then again I don't go on tour either and only gig once a month or so.

I always bring my rubber backed area rug with me. Last year I bought one that matched the color of my kit. I think it was only $30 or so.

I've never had other bands use my drums at gigs, so I don't know what the protocol is there. I've had other drummers sit in for me for a few songs at gigs, but that's about it.
Hmm I see. Yeah I'd be getting soft cases as I heard hard ones are heavy and bulky.
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
I have seen soft cases at JS Music on Jalan Imbi in KL.

If you only gig once in a while a bit of care and a couple of blankets will do.

A rug is essential as many floors is tiled here in Malaysia.
Alternatively you can connect your drum stool and bass drum with a piece of string. This methode has the disadvantage that the distance between your stool and bass drum is fixed. Sometimes its nice to be able to adjust a bit.


thx

jorn

http://jsmusic.com.my/jsmusic/Product_drum.php
I guess you're a Malaysian too? Cool. Yea will be doing a bit of shoping this week, thanks for the reply.

Forget the sheet, it would be worse than useless. Get a rug big enough so your bass drum and throne are on it. Bare minimum. Bigger is better. 5 feet x 6 feet is the largest you should need. Cases are not necessary at this stage in the game, you could skip them for this gig, unless you have the cash, then yea why not?. ALWAYS carry a rug to a gig, a spare pedal, spare snare, place extra sticks where you can grab them in case you drop them while playing. Don't forget a drum key, duct tape, and always remember to BRING A SPARE KICK DRUM HEAD! If that breaks you're hosed.

In the US I've never seen drummers having to pay to share a kit. Don't know the protocol in Malaysia.
5by 6 you say? Okay. Wow that seems a lot of spares I need. Will add spare pedal and spare kick drum head to my shopping list. Thanks for the advice.
 
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