Gig on Someone Else's kit...

thelimpingtoad

Senior Member
Well maybe... But the advantage is that I won't really care if they adjust stuff.
Also, The HH will be mounted on a cymbal stand so it could be put on the left if needed. AND i have a regular hi-hat stand that I could provide if needed.
But this all may be a moot point because i'm going to talk to the drummer first and see how they feel about the set being adjusted.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
Well that's cool but my problem is really that I play a non-traditional set-up. I have a remote Hi-hat so if i can't place the HH on my right side i'm completely screwed. I haven't played cross over in years.
I'd definitely start working on that as soon as possible. You're going to find yourself in the situation of playing someone else's kit very frequently if you play gigs, and if your playing relies heavily on a non-traditional placement of a piece of equipment, you will find yourself in trouble. You should at least be at a level where you can play comfortably on other typical setups, even if it means having to sacrifice some details in fills or grooves.

Having said that, you can always bring the remote hat with you. Positioning a remote hat pedal, a cable and a stand for the hihat itself shouldn't require moving other pieces around. It'll also only take a minute or two to set up.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
This is something I have very strong views on. I never, ever play a gig with someone else's kit. It's just a lazy sound guys excuse often used by crappy PA companies who can't / can't be bothered to re-EQ a kit between sets. There's little, if any, difference in setup time between changing the kits over & modifying what's already there. It's dead simple. You have your kit side stage ready to move into place. With two crew, even with a fairly big kit, this takes 2-3 minutes max. I've done this many times at some fairly big gigs and never had a problem.

Would a guitarist or key player accept using someone else's instrument / rear line? I don't think so. The sound guy has to re-EQ all the other instruments so why not the drums? It's about time we stood up to this kind of "poor relation" treatment. Why we drummers continue to accept this is beyond me.

There, I'm off my soap box now.
 

Stoney

Senior Member
Would a guitarist or key player accept using someone else's instrument / rear line? I don't think so. The sound guy has to re-EQ all the other instruments so why not the drums? It's about time we stood up to this kind of "poor relation" treatment. Why we drummers continue to accept this is beyond me. There, I'm off my soap box now.
Well said!

Besides, statistically there's a good chance of at least one of them 10 drummers being a lefty. And if there is it will take a hell of a lot longer for him to re-adjust everything than to whip his own kit on.

I'll warn you though that If you do take your own kit, I would be very careful that you don't end up having to share that with the 9 bands instead! And they'll all ask... especially if you have a better kit believe me! Since you're 3rd on though a perfect excuse would be that your lift has to leave straight after your set.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
This is something I have very strong views on. I never, ever play a gig with someone else's kit. It's just a lazy sound guys excuse often used by crappy PA companies who can't / can't be bothered to re-EQ a kit between sets. There's little, if any, difference in setup time between changing the kits over & modifying what's already there. It's dead simple. You have your kit side stage ready to move into place. With two crew, even with a fairly big kit, this takes 2-3 minutes max. I've done this many times at some fairly big gigs and never had a problem.
Well, good for you, but this policy simply wouldn't work for me, and would definitely mean I'd have to turn down gigs. It's not just a matter of re-micing a kit, it's also the fact that the other kit(s) need to reside somewhere when off the stage, and smaller venues usually don't have the room for that. And "crew"? I guess you're at a higher level of gigging than many of us... I certainly haven't had crew members on any gig I've played.

Lazy sound man? Well, maybe, but I can't say I blame him. Having to soundcheck two, three or four kits instead of one would take a lot of time, and it's not like the sound guys on small gigs make a killing doing their job as it is.

As for the actual swapping of kits... Well, on a regular small gig, about half the audience disappear between bands as it is, either temporarily or permanently. Removing the microphones from a kit, moving that off the stage, getting another kit on stage, placing the microphones and then doing a quick sound check will take at least ten minutes extra, and probably closer to twenty-five more often than not. If I was at a bar gig with a few bands I'd never heard of, and I had to wait up to half an hour between bands, I'd probably lose interest. At the very least, all the energy the previous band managed to project to the audience will be g-o-n-e.

Separate kits are great for bigger gigs, where you can store several kits partially or completely set up off stage, where the soundman and his equipment is good enough to quickly get a good sound going on a new kit, and where there might be people who can help you get kits broken down and set up, but on a small bar gig, with two, three or four bands sharing the stage on a single night, it's just not practical.

It sucks a bit for us drummers, because we're the ones who generally have to be stuck playing other people's gear in these situations, but I think we come off stronger as a result of it. In addition to this, I find myself playing different stuff simply by sitting behind another kit than I normally do, so the whole situation might lead to new and inventive playing :)
 

Stoney

Senior Member
Lazy sound man? Well, maybe, but I can't say I blame him. Having to soundcheck two, three or four kits instead of one would take a lot of time, and it's not like the sound guys on small gigs make a killing doing their job as it is.
Any sound men refusing to put in the extra work because it's more than their jobs worth are usually the ones stuck in the smaller gigs anyway (catch 22). It's always the good and more helpful ones that manage to break out of that circuit.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
Any sound men refusing to put in the extra work because it's more than their jobs worth are usually the ones stuck in the smaller gigs anyway (catch 22). It's always the good and more helpful ones that manage to break out of that circuit.
Very true, but playing small gigs you're stuck with the mediocre ones.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I take your point on some of the smaller gigs, especially the off stage storage issue. When each drummer uses their own snare, cymbals, additional toms & changes the positions of half the kit you need to mostly reposition the mics anyhow. I've seen this time after time and it takes just as long as bringing in a new setup as long as it's properly organised. Any decent engineer can re-EQ the kit without a sound check in the first 30 seconds of the first number. There will always be exceptions but most of the time it's sheer lazyness on behalf of the sound crew. For the record, I used to play some big gigs but, after a 20 year layoff, I'm now playing pubs, clubs & the occasional festival. I set up & pack my own stuff. The crew I was referring to are the sound guys or maybe the singer! They usually get away with doing just about nothing anyway.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
Not necessarily true. That's a bit like saying you'll only find mediocre drummers playing small gigs. ;)
Yeah, that came across wrong. I've had some great sound guys at small venues, so I didn't mean to say that all small venues have crap sound guys :)
 
Top