Geeking out a little!

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I don't normally geek out on minor upgrades, but I figured since I have a Gretsch kit from 1972, I wanted to at least get the bass drum back to it's era-specific parts. I found some new Gretsch disappearing outrigger spurs for it and NOW the drum has the correct vibe!

I've always loved this spurs' look whenever I saw people like Elvin, Max, or Tony play. And I have discovered that so long as I use a pedal with a plate, this type of spur works well - especially on a bass drum with nothing mounted. On my gig carpet, the bass drum doesn't want to creep forward while I'm slamming it. So it's nice to have a bass drum that doesn't weigh a ton because of the new modern spurs they use these days.

Although it doesn't help acoustically, psychologically it has the right mood ;)
 

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wildbill

Platinum Member
I had a set with slide-in spurs.
It was hard to get them set even without putting some kind of stop on the leg inside the drum.
Other than that, they're handy.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I had a set with slide-in spurs.
It was hard to get them set even without putting some kind of stop on the leg inside the drum.
Other than that, they're handy.
Really? I just hold the front end of the drum up to where I want it, then drop each leg and tighten the wing screw.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
That drum doesn't look anywhere near that old! If you told me it was 5-10 years old I'd possibly believe it. (aside from the spurs, mount and muffling knob that give it away) What is that mount for anyway? A cowbell?
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
That drum doesn't look anywhere near that old! If you told me it was 5-10 years old I'd possibly believe it. (aside from the spurs, mount and muffling knob that give it away) What is that mount for anyway? A cowbell?
That square plate I took off from one of the extra toms I had. It's a clip tom mount. It's the same size as the bass drum tom mount base. So rather than leave the bass mount, I decided to cover it with the tom mount instead since it would never be used.

I admit, the muffling knob is the only thing left of the internal bass drum muffler. I have the internal muffler but I took it out because I didn't need it. The knobs also cover the little screw holes too. So all the drums appear vintage, but I took all the mufflers out. If I always use coated heads, nobody can tell ;)

And to be honest, the actual mounts for the spurs, were taken off of the '67 Yamaha kit I rebuilt. They made theirs better and heavier, but they take the same size rod. I do have new Gretsch mounts though that I can keep as spares.

I may try some Evans heads on the kit soon. I have a Evans 56 calfskin EQ4 for the front and a clear EQ4 for the batter side, and I also have G1's and coated G2's for the toms.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Awesome looking classic Gretsch set! Hope this one’s a keeper.
I think it is. I haven't been able to stop playing this kit yet. I'm getting in at least an hour a day since I got it up and running. We're also shopping for a new house, perhaps downsizing a bit before we retire in another 12 years, so I'm beginning to clear out extra gear I hardly use. I've already sold off two kits as well. I'm heading toward a simpler existence as we speak. This may be the kit that sticks around (with two complete sets of hardware - one left set up, and one packed up that goes out).
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
On the issue of bass drum creeping, when I first started drumming in the 1960s, it was just natural to tie the throne to the bass drum with a piece of rope to stop the bass drum from walking away. (I once lent my kit to another local drummer who returned it with a NAIL in the bottom of the bass drum where he'd nailed it to the stage!!!!!!!)

Anyway, about fifteen years ago I had a "brainstorm" when servicing my pedal and (honestly) noticed the anchor screws on the pedal base. I'd never used them. So the next time I practiced I screwed the anchor screws down so they would engage the carpet - goodbye bass drum creep forever. Heck, with the anchors screwed down, the spurs can be used for nothing more than levelers.

Why had I never thought to use the anchors before? I honestly don't know. But, I check out other people's kits, and not once have I seen any other local drummer using the pedal anchors.

So, is this something that a lot of us are guilty of? How many other guys neglect to use the bd pedal anchors?

By the way, Bo, that is a beautiful drum!

GeeDeeEmm
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
On the issue of bass drum creeping, when I first started drumming in the 1960s, it was just natural to tie the throne to the bass drum with a piece of rope to stop the bass drum from walking away. (I once lent my kit to another local drummer who returned it with a NAIL in the bottom of the bass drum where he'd nailed it to the stage!!!!!!!)

Anyway, about fifteen years ago I had a "brainstorm" when servicing my pedal and (honestly) noticed the anchor screws on the pedal base. I'd never used them. So the next time I practiced I screwed the anchor screws down so they would engage the carpet - goodbye bass drum creep forever. Heck, with the anchors screwed down, the spurs can be used for nothing more than levelers.

Why had I never thought to use the anchors before? I honestly don't know. But, I check out other people's kits, and not once have I seen any other local drummer using the pedal anchors.

So, is this something that a lot of us are guilty of? How many other guys neglect to use the bd pedal anchors?

By the way, Bo, that is a beautiful drum!

GeeDeeEmm
Thanks!

I think a lot of people are guilty of neglecting the anchors on the pedal. What works even better is I put skateboard grip tape on the hoop where the pedal clamps on (inner and outer) and that helps even more to keep the bass drum with the pedal. I’ve played so hard on other kits the bass drum would fly off of the pedal!
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
On the issue of bass drum creeping, when I first started drumming in the 1960s, it was just natural to tie the throne to the bass drum with a piece of rope to stop the bass drum from walking away. (I once lent my kit to another local drummer who returned it with a NAIL in the bottom of the bass drum where he'd nailed it to the stage!!!!!!!)

Anyway, about fifteen years ago I had a "brainstorm" when servicing my pedal and (honestly) noticed the anchor screws on the pedal base. I'd never used them. So the next time I practiced I screwed the anchor screws down so they would engage the carpet - goodbye bass drum creep forever. Heck, with the anchors screwed down, the spurs can be used for nothing more than levelers.

Why had I never thought to use the anchors before? I honestly don't know. But, I check out other people's kits, and not once have I seen any other local drummer using the pedal anchors.

So, is this something that a lot of us are guilty of? How many other guys neglect to use the bd pedal anchors?

By the way, Bo, that is a beautiful drum!

GeeDeeEmm

Sadly that doesn't work on wood floors - I know this because I scratched the hell out of a stage a few years ago when I forgot I had the spikes still out. Ugh...
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Sadly that doesn't work on wood floors - I know this because I scratched the hell out of a stage a few years ago when I forgot I had the spikes still out. Ugh...
I played a basketball court and put the spikes down. I didn’t feel bad until later.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Are you going to do a video with these like you did with the other USA set? I'd love to hear them. Especially to hear how they differ from the other set. I can't get enough of the stop sign badge set I bought recently. The other night I came home from work dying to get in even just a few minutes of playing time before helping kids with homework and bed time routines. I needed to hear them to get my fix for the day.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Are you going to do a video with these like you did with the other USA set? I'd love to hear them. Especially to hear how they differ from the other set. I can't get enough of the stop sign badge set I bought recently. The other night I came home from work dying to get in even just a few minutes of playing time before helping kids with homework and bed time routines. I needed to hear them to get my fix for the day.
I did do this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2ZujEwyhlU

It was just done with a single overhead, and a mic about a foot infant of the bass drum. I should do one with just the Zoom Q8. It sounds much better now as the heads break in.

I'm tempted to try some Evans heads next since I have those, and I may try the full-on Charlie Watts experience and cut a big hole in the front head essentially making it single-headed with a mic inside ;)

But I'm with you on the vibe I feel when I play them. There's some serious mojo going on in these maple/gum/maple shells. I don't know what it is - i just know I play them whenever I get the chance.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Yeah, those sound good! The toms work perfectly together and the bass drum.

I’m using Evans UV1s on top w G1 clear on the bottom and love the sound. Open like a single ply head but meatier sounding than a G1 or Ambassador. The UV1 heads sounded a little cold at first, but they warmed up after a little break in. Those heads don’t show any wear after a couple of months with a lot of playing.
 

Skrivarna

Senior Member
I had a set with slide-in spurs.
It was hard to get them set even without putting some kind of stop on the leg inside the drum.
That is what I do. Wrap a small piece of gaffers tape around the spur (on the inside) .. and done!

I love these simple, lightweight legs.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
That is what I do. Wrap a small piece of gaffers tape around the spur (on the inside) .. and done!

I love these simple, lightweight legs.
I think I actually have 3/8” memory locks somewhere. I’ll try that to see if life is easier. After doing a gig this past weekend without the drum being in a case, I suppose it would be easy for the wing but to loosen and the leg falling out while moving from the car.
 
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