Gavin Harrison here!

alegre

Junior Member
About "Designer" and "19 days"

Hi Gavin, this is Alessandro from Italy.
I've recently taken two of your drum clinics here in Italy the last February (Boschello music store in Mirano and Irish pub in Treviglio). They were absolutely great!!
You told me you've played two songs named "Designer" (I guess the first in your set-list) and "19 days". I loved both and found two of the most interesting and high-level played songs I've ever heard. But I forgot asking the name of the band!! Please can you give me the references so I can buy the CD's containing those songs?
While I know that the song "OOPS" is from Steps Ahead. Is it right?
What about your CD "Sanity and Gravity". Is unavailable from Most of the seller (Amazon and CDuniverse) Will it be available soon?
Thank you very much, I'm waiting for your answers

Bye
Alessandro
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Cha,

yes it's 3 sixteenth note triplets - starting on the last 8th note of the bar and goes onto the first note of the next bar - so it's actually four notes in total.

Cheers
Gavin
 

Drizzle

Member
Hey Gavin,

Any hints on what you will be doing at the Musikmesse.
During your performances that is....

Have you worked out something especially for the show, or some of the same things as in your DVD’s?

What’s your thought on ‘clinics’ anyway….Is it something you like to do or it’s more of an obligation to an endorser?

I recently read in an interview with Vinnie Colaiuta in MD that he doesn’t do clinics because to him it served no purpose, that there’s no context, that the audience only wants to see him blow them away with speed and chops.
Sensationalism he calls it.

You strike me as someone who loves drumming as an art, and that you like to share as much of it with other people, so I'm curious how you 'see' it.

Excellent article by the way, really sheds some light on how Vinnie thinks about drumming in general.

PS. Is the groove in 7/8 on the Rhythmic Horizons DVD taken from Stings song Saint Augustine in Hell featuring Vinnie on drums, or is it just a coincidence?

I’m still in doubt if I will go, it’s a 5 hour drive for me so…….half hour show isn't it????

Greetz, Andre
 
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cha

Junior Member
wo, thanks for explaining man!
im ordering rhytmic horizons and visions and theres some problem with the shipping..
me and my bass player just cant wait any longer..!

keep on rocking on!
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Drizzle,
the show at Frankfurt Musikmesse isn't really a clinic. I will just play 5 or 6 songs in the 30 minute slot.
Doing clinics is not an obligation for me - I have the choice to say no. I enjoy doing them - but only ever do a small amount of them.

I read the Vinnie Colaiuta interview (very interesting) and I agree with a lot of the things he said. A lot of young/beginner drummers come to clinics - obviously because they want to learn something - but they are the ones who are most impressed with technique - so you can feel pressurized to play something fast and flash because it gets a good reaction. But I try to make something musical out of my clinics and steer clear of "fireworks and tricks". Maybe that's why I don't get so many offers to do clinics?

The 7/8 pattern is actually inspired by Sting's "Straight To My Heart" which is programmed drums as far I know.

Hi Cha,
The Rhythmic Visions DVD is currently 'sold out' at "Burning Shed" but the new one "Rhythmic Horizons" is available. I don't know why you had a shipping problem - you should contact them directly.

Cheers
Gavin
 

Sam

Pioneer Member
Hi Gavin, another question.

I'd would like to start my own proffesional studio in 3 or 4 months.
I was looking into some products. The main things I'll be purshasing would be a new mixer (ana or digi), new mics and preamps.

These products caught my interest: Mackie Digital X-bus - Yamaha O2R96V2

Those 2 are large, expensive digital mixers. (+- 10000 - 12000 euro/$)

I was thinking of getting a superd analog mixer like this one Mackie 32:8.

This mixer costs a 5th of the price above, but I'm in doubt if this is capable of giving extremely good quality (pro cd-quality)?

As for mics, I'm probably going to purshase some Neumann U87i's (matched pair), probably 4 or 5 Shure SM57's, an AKG D112, and 2 AKG C414, and 3 Sennheiser MD 421-II's. When I wouldn't buy those highly expensive mixingdesks, i could afford myself that mackie mixer (+ meterbridge) + all those mics mentioned + preamps.

The question is: IS that mackie capable of giving me pro-studio quality? And what other add-ons beside good pre-amps and good mics would you recommend?
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Sam,
choosing a desk is a tough decision. I've used the Mackie 32:8 for the last ten years and I'm very happy with it - I think the mic amps are excellent. I recently compared them to API 3124 mic amps and I really couldn't hear any difference I blind tested a few musician producer friends of mine and they couldn't hear a difference either. The API's are about $2500 dollars for 4 amps.
10 Years ago the Mackie was the only real choice that I could afford - if I wanted take an individual output from each channel. Otherwise I could have only recorded 8 things at a time through other "8 bus" desks.

We have the 02R96 desk - we use it as a monitor desk in Porcupine Tree and it's very good. We wanted the 'recall-ability" because of the day to day problems of touring. I haven't tried it in a studio situation but I don't think you can have so many outputs as the Mackie.

"The question is: IS that mackie capable of giving me pro-studio quality? And what other add-ons beside good pre-amps and good mics would you recommend?"

I have no doubt about it not being a 'pro' desk. The other things that make a HUGE difference is the room in which you record the drums. The drums/cymbals themselves and the way they're tuned/damped plus a really good drummer who knows how to 'play' a good sound out of the kit. Also a REALLY big thing is knowledge and experience about engineering. The recordings I made in my studio 10 years ago are nowhere as good as they are now - and the only thing that has really changed is my experience.

Cheers
Gavin
 

Sam

Pioneer Member
Thank you for answering my question.

I'm really getting into that Mackie (the 24:8 version). The only thing is, that the meterbridge costs A LOT!!! Man, almost a fourth of the mixer. Do you know if the meterbridge is an additional advantage or ... is it just "nice & cool"?

I will get some new preamps, maybe 1 avalon preamp, i'm not sure.

Can you list your favorite mic setup? And, do you also have Neumann mics?

Another question, which interface do you use to connect those 16 drumkit mics of yours to your pc/mac?

I supose you use 2 firewire interfaces yes? (like an appogee interface, (8 line inputs)) You, just connect two of them to your computer yes?
 
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crookedrook

Member
Hey Gavin-

I thought I would give some non-technical questions, kind of simple minded questions. I've been sitting here in my media room listening and watching the Deadwing CD DTS surround sound. I was watching some of the extra video clips and I heard you mention something like; You didn't know why people got nervous before a show, musicians perception before a show is that something will go wrong, but it ends up being a good show...you get nervous, right? With so many drum parts, tempos and time signature changes running through your head. Do you get to enjoy the moment?

BTW....I love Mother and Child Divided-great instrumental!


-Rob
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Sam,
I've never used the meter-bridge. If you follow Mackie's instructions about setting sensible gain structure - using the solo button and looking at the level coming up the main meter - everything should be fine.

Regarding the mic list - I just answered your question about that a few days ago where I listed the 16 channels. See page 23.

Yes I use two Apogee Rosetta 800's to go in and out of the computer.


Hi crookedrook,
I'm not nervous when I go on stage - I was talking about other people who get really wound up before going on - and the anticipation of a disaster is the thing that's driving them nuts.

"With so many drum parts, tempos and time signature changes running through your head. Do you get to enjoy the moment? "

Usually the first few shows I've got a lot to think about so I probably don't enjoy it as much as I do a week later when most of the parts are becoming second nature.

Cheers
Gavin
 

crookedrook

Member
Gavin-

Quick question about recording/mic'g your bass drum: Do you prefer your front bass drum head to have a hole or without? I get so many different opions and suggestions about how it sounds from sound engineers that I am not sure. I know the sound would be better traveling through the hole, but I'm not sure. HELP!

Thanks,
Rob
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi crookedrook,
I always have a hole in the front head (in the 4 o'clock position - about 5") - and the tip of the Audix D6 is about an inch inside the hole. The Shure SM91 is inside on a cushion.

There's an Italian drum manufacturer who makes a hole in the shell of the bass drum - so you can angle a mic in there - that way you could keep the front head uncut. I don't know how this would sound - but it's an interesting idea.

Immagine 4.jpg

cheers
Gavin
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
There's an Italian drum manufacturer who makes a hole in the shell of the bass drum - so you can angle a mic in there - that way you could keep the front head uncut. I don't know how this would sound - but it's an interesting idea.

View attachment 11654
The Finnish custom drum builder Kumu has made such side holes for quite a few years. The sound is just amazing. You can have the low end and resonance of an intact head while micing from the inside. The hole itself has little effect on the drum's sound.
 

Drizzle

Member
There's also the May Internal Miking system, also used by Dave Weckl.


The only thing is that it's expensive, and that it’s not easy to adjust when you have no hole in the fronthead.

I made one myself, just a small piece of metal which holds my BETA52 and is screwed the same as in the picture. I’ve put the female XLR-plug in the hole for the tomholders, which I don’t use because I have a rack. But you could also go through the vent hole.

Although I could use a closed fronthead, I still use one with a hole also at 4 o’clock.

It's not that it's sounds better than before,(maybe if I start to use a closed fronthead) but it's mainly because now I don’t need a stand for the mic, and it’s always in the place I like.

Andre
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Wavelength,
Thanks for the link - I've been looking at the KUMU website - very interesting looking drums. How do they sound? Do you play them?

Hi Drizzle,
yes I'm familiar with the May Mic system. In a live setting I usually use just the Shure SM91 so I don't need a mic stand either. I use a heavy pillow in my bass drum and I find that at every soundcheck I need to get my hand inside the bass drum and re-adjust the position of it - as the drums get packed in cases that get turned upside down etc, so the pillow moves. If I had a front head with no hole that would be a problem.
Talking of internal mounting systems - have you seen this?

http://www.kellyshu.com/

Looks very interesting.
Cheers
Gavin
 
Interesting conversation,
In my travels and tinkering with different bass drum miking systems, I have found that there is no CORRECT or an "All Encompassing Procedure" for miking a bass drum. It all depends on the sound you're going for.
The mounted mics provide ease of setup and convenience, but they do have some drawbacks. Vibration from the shell, transferred to the bracket, and then to the mic, causes unwanted overtones, transients etc... The other problem has been already stated. "If you have no hole in your front head, how do you get to the mic to adjust it if needed?" The site Gavin has provided for us...
http://www.kellyshu.com/
...has an interesting innovation to cut down on direct vibrations from shell to mic. On the other hand, if thats what your going for and it sound good in your monitors, than by all means, GO FOR IT!
I have also found that having a hole in your front head has a fascinating side effect. From a purely scientific standpoint, when you push air through a tube or a hole you get a more focused column of air against the mic. (more commonly found in woodwind or brass instruments recordings). If you have no front head, the air is dispersed in a less direct way towards the mic capturing more of the drum sound and batter head, than the air rushing into the microphone diaphram. One way is not more correct than the other. Experiment with all kinds of ideas for capturing your bass drum sound. If someone tells you that you should do it "this" way and no way else. Kindly thank them and run the other way :)

Gavin, hope all is well.

P.S. I would have bought tickets to the May 19th show in NYC, but i am graduating from Albany State that weekend. The next time PT rolls around here, i will definatly be there.

Take care and God bless.

MM
 

crookedrook

Member
Thanks Gavin....much appreciated!



Hi crookedrook,
I always have a hole in the front head (in the 4 o'clock position - about 5") - and the tip of the Audix D6 is about an inch inside the hole. The Shure SM91 is inside on a cushion.

There's an Italian drum manufacturer who makes a hole in the shell of the bass drum - so you can angle a mic in there - that way you could keep the front head uncut. I don't know how this would sound - but it's an interesting idea.

View attachment 11654

cheers
Gavin
 

Sam

Pioneer Member
The pillow can easily be solved. Just put some velcro in your bassdrum and some on the pillow.

DW does the same, and I've moved my kick around, upside down, everything, AND everything is always in place.

Those kick drum mounts are nice. I'm more of a stand-fan.
 

Drizzle

Member
No I hadn't seen the Kelly Shu system before, but it looks good.
Sometimes the most simple things can be so effective.

I was wondering, you said you use a heavy pillow. How heavy is it ,and is it a real pillow or is it something you just call a pillow, 'cause most pillows I know aren't really heavy.

I also use a 'pillow', it's more of a big blanket folded up, it's made of the same fabric they make flags from. It touches both heads.
I use Evans Emad heads on both sides, you know with dampring on it. I have a 20” bassdrum so it needs a little help in the lows.
Before this I would use a rolled up towel like Simon Phillips used to have, taped to the head but that didn't help enough for me.

John ‘JR’ Robinson uses a bag filled with sand (talking about heavy), maybe I’ll try that sometime.

Greetz,
Andre
 

BenOBrienSmith

Senior Member
Hey Gavin,

I've been checking out some of the pictures of your live setup and I noticed a mixing/recording desk to the left of your hi-hat. (Here's a picture:
)
What are you running through this desk?

Also, I must compliment both your playing and your drum sound and all the recordings I have of you. The drums just sing and you play with such a great pocket that it's impossible to stay still and listen at the same time. Thanks for the music/inspiration!

-Ben
 
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