Gavin Harrison here!

Tobal90

Junior Member
Hello, Gavin.
First of all, I would like to say that you're a great inspiration. I started to play drums about 3 months ago and drummers like you make me want to practice more and more =D.

Well, My question is this: In an interview you said that you didn't know much about King Crimson and stuff, but me and a friend have this great doubt "What's the meaning of 'Book Of Saturday' from the great album 'Lark's Tounges In Aspic'?'

If you could answer that, I would really apreciate xD
Oh, by the way, are you planning to come to Chile with Porcupine Tree in the tour for your next album? We are a lot of pepole waiting for you to come.

Well, my best wishes and keep your great Drumming.
Cristóbal.
 

supermac

Senior Member
Hi Gavin,

Great performance on MD Festival 2008 DVD, which has just come out in UK.

The kit sounds fantastic.

I wanted to ask: with so many stellar drummers on the bill, is there any competitiveness between the musicians, and which of the other performances did you particularly enjoy?


Cheers
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Fragile

I'm a young drummer and having been playing for a while now, I've grown tired of playing along to my CDs, and was wondering on what advice you give about finding your first gig? Not a band situation, but more a one-off type thing?

Your best bet is to find some local musicians and try to get a play with them. I don't really understand what you mean by a 'one-off type of thing'? What are you expecting?

Hi Vylor

I've listened to The Sound of Muzak about 10.000 times and still the drum sound is the most incredible, clear, powerful drum sound I've ever heard, especially the bassdrum and the snare. That brings me to my question: HOW did you get that awesome sound on the recording?

There are so many things that would make a difference - it would hard to describe. There's the drums themselves, the way that I hit them, the skins, the tuning, the dampening, the microphones, the room, the mic amps, the eq, the very experienced engineer, eq/compression, the mixing, the mastering and so it goes on.

I just found out that you use the audix i5 snare mic, so now I'm not sure wether to buy this one or the Sennheiser E 905 which I tried out for a while and think it's a really good snare mic.

The Audix i5 is VERY close to a Shure SM57 and that's really the industry standard for snare drum. I use the Audix because I thought it could take a few more stray hits than the Shure.

How did you (or Steven or whoever) mix and master it and what special treatment did you give to the sound of the bassdrum?!? It has everything a bassdrum needs, hearing it is so satisfying and I just don't know how to let my bassdrum sound that way when recording and mixing it. A hint for a desperate drummer, please?!


see the answer above about variables - but Nishmaster had some good suggestions. I think I remember using my Beyer M88 on that session in combination with the U47.

Hi Tobal90

Well, My question is this: In an interview you said that you didn't know much about King Crimson and stuff, but me and a friend have this great doubt "What's the meaning of 'Book Of Saturday' from the great album 'Lark's Tounges In Aspic'?'


I don't even know that song. As I said - I don't know much about King Crimson.

Oh, by the way, are you planning to come to Chile with Porcupine Tree in the tour for your next album?


We have no plans to come at the moment.

Hi supermac

Great performance on MD Festival 2008 DVD, which has just come out in UK.
The kit sounds fantastic.


Thanks

I wanted to ask: with so many stellar drummers on the bill, is there any competitiveness between the musicians, and which of the other performances did you particularly enjoy?


No - everyone was very supportive of each other - I didn't feel any competitiveness. Loved Simon Phillips set - and so many of the others too. The standard was very high indeed.

cheers
Gavin
 

Fragile

Junior Member
Hi Fragile

I'm a young drummer and having been playing for a while now, I've grown tired of playing along to my CDs, and was wondering on what advice you give about finding your first gig? Not a band situation, but more a one-off type thing?

Your best bet is to find some local musicians and try to get a play with them. I don't really understand what you mean by a 'one-off type of thing'? What are you expecting?


I was thinking something that isn't full commitment to a particular band, but more a session job (but live), I tried playing in a band a couple of times, but I much prefer having the experience of playing many types of music, rather than confining to one genre, at least for now.
 

MaidenFanSte

Junior Member
Hi Fragile

I'm a young drummer and having been playing for a while now, I've grown tired of playing along to my CDs, and was wondering on what advice you give about finding your first gig? Not a band situation, but more a one-off type thing?

Your best bet is to find some local musicians and try to get a play with them. I don't really understand what you mean by a 'one-off type of thing'? What are you expecting?


I was thinking something that isn't full commitment to a particular band, but more a session job (but live), I tried playing in a band a couple of times, but I much prefer having the experience of playing many types of music, rather than confining to one genre, at least for now.
Sorry to butt in, but are 'Jam Nights' a possibility for you?
They're a good way to get a decent variety of styles under your belt without committing to anything. Other than that, maybe get a few friends around maybe.

Alright Gavin.

I've recently bought the Axis A Longboard. I was just wondering how long you had them before you experimented with the settings on it?
It's unlike any pedal I've had before and I'm just wondering if tinkering at this stage is counter productive? Maybe I should just get used to the feel of it in the factory standard settings before messing about with settings.

What's your take on it?

Thanks.
 

Vdrummer09

Junior Member
Hello Gavin

A big fan of your for many years, I wanted to ask a few questions if I may?

With material such as the stunning album you did with 05ric, how much of your playing is improv or is it rehearsed with exact rhythms and fills? For example, if you played it live, how much would be as per the album or would it always vary, or would you naturally vary things anyway?

Is there a chance of any live shows with 05ric?

My next question is, as someone returning to the drums after 20 something years, I have always played by ear, I never had lessons and don't read music. I did ok before I quit, but given your background in theory, do you feel it is possible to be a good drummer without the theory?

Finally, have you ever played or owned any of the Roland V Drums range and if so what are your thoughts on them?

Thank you once again, I consider you the greatest drummer performing.
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Fragile

I was thinking something that isn't full commitment to a particular band, but more a session job (but live), I tried playing in a band a couple of times, but I much prefer having the experience of playing many types of music, rather than confining to one genre, at least for now.

Then maybe as MaidenFanSte suggests - a jam session is the way to go.

Hi MaidenFanSte,

I've recently bought the Axis A Longboard. I was just wondering how long you had them before you experimented with the settings on it?


It's certainly a pedal that has a lot of adjustment possibilities. I messed around with it straight away and tried to match the feel of my previous pedal - and although it didn't feel the same - I quickly got used to the Axis.

Hi Vdrummer09

With material such as the stunning album you did with 05ric, how much of your playing is improv or is it rehearsed with exact rhythms and fills? For example, if you played it live, how much would be as per the album or would it always vary, or would you naturally vary things anyway?

There's a video on YouTube of me playing "Unsettled" so I guess you can see for yourself how much (or little) I changed. Also there's three GH05 songs on the Modern Drummer Weekend 08 DVD. I think I pretty much play the parts of the songs with some variation in the fills.

Is there a chance of any live shows with 05ric?


Not at the moment.

My next question is, as someone returning to the drums after 20 something years, I have always played by ear, I never had lessons and don't read music. I did ok before I quit, but given your background in theory, do you feel it is possible to be a good drummer without the theory?

Yes you can get a long way without any 'theory' (as you call it) - but you could go a lot further and get there faster if you did have more theory. It depends if you want to be the best you can be - or just ok.

Finally, have you ever played or owned any of the Roland V Drums range and if so what are your thoughts on them?

I have played many electronic drums in my time (including Vdrums) and I have to say it's really not my thing. I don't really enjoy it - and therefore try to avoid it. I can see the great advantages to practising with them - if you're in a situation where playing the real drums are just too loud for everyone around.

cheers
Gavin
 

xopethx

Senior Member
Hey Gavin!
I recently joined a group here in Boston (after moving here in December), and we're getting ready to play some exciting gigs...exciting, especially for me, as i've never played a live show before. As it were, our first performance will be a live studio performance at a radio station....i suppose i've done things a bit backwards since i started drumming anyway, so no matter. My question is this - over your career, as you performed with different groups and your time began to become more precious, how did that affect your personal practice time? Did you find that playing, in general, was good enough? The music i'm playing is based on improvisation and dynamics (a blend of rock, funk, and a hint of jazz), so at this point i feel like ANY time behind the kit is time well spent. However, now that i'm rehearsing these songs or working on new ones with these guys, the time i've previously spent wandering around in my own head has really diminished. Did you ever experience this, and notice a difference in your playing or your progress? It's difficult for me to evaluate myself in the first place, only having played for 2 years, so perhaps you could better judge how one's personal practice time compares to gaining general experience on the kit?

Thanks so much, Gavin.
If you're ever in the Boston area, and have some time, I'd love to have a lesson with you.
-Chris Anderson
 

hauk

Silver Member
Hi Gavin,

I've been practicing with a metronome for a couple years and i had this thought the other day: Is it possible that by practicing with a metronome, you can develop a metronome-dependence? Like maybe you depend on a metronome to be able to keep steady time?

I have no doubt that playing with a metronome makes you better at, well, playing with a metronome. But does just playing with a metronome make you better at keeping steady time when playing without a metronome? Are there any specific excercises for that?

I ask this because since i started playing/practicing with a metronome, i started to notice that when playing without one, my time isn't that steady anymore. I'm thinking that maybe that happens because i may be developing "metronome-dependence", but then again, maybe it's the fact that by playing with a metronome, i've started to develop a better ear for time, and i start to see flaws in my playing that i didn't see before.

I realize that this whole "metronome-dependence" idea may be ridiculous, but i'd love to hear (read) your take on this.

Cheers!
Sorry to interrupt, but I have a practice method that might help you out (and anyone else on this thread). When you're playing along with your met, it's usually set on quarters or eighths. Start setting it on half notes - it probably will still feel pretty normal depending on the tempo. Then move it to whole notes. Keep decreasing the frequency like that until you can play four measures and land right back with the click on beat one (you might need to use a drum program or advanced metronome on the computer if your met can't click once every 4 bars). It's frustrating and quite difficult, but it will really clean up your time.
 

MaidenFanSte

Junior Member
Cheers for that Gavin.
:)



Good idea, I think I saw a sign for one in a local pub, but I think it might be 18+ =[
They usually are 18+. But depending on your age, you can usually either go in and not drink alcohol, or see if you can get an adult to take you. I'd say it's definitely worth a try.
 

asmodeus

Junior Member
Hi Gavin!

I hope you're doing well! I have a few questions for you:

1.- I'm playing in a band and obviously drums are loud enough, so there's no need to put them through the PA-system, BUT they sound dry overall, especially the snare drum. In a recording situation one always puts some sort of hall on it. So the question would be if you (or anybody else reading this thread) have any experience/recommendation regarding drum effects (hall) in a rehearsal situation.
(By the way: I'm the bass player in the band, but I wanted to ask you before I suggest anything to my drummer :p)

2.- I bought your Rhythmic Horizons DVD, it's great :D. I have one question regarding overriding: In this chapter you suggest different subdivisions for overriding with the hi-hat e.g. quarter notes 8ths and every 3 16ths. The relation between quarter notes and 8ths is obvious, but is there any logical relation to overriding with every 3 16ths? Or is it arbitrary and could just as well have been overriding with every 5 16ths for instance?

Take care and thanks!

Stefan
 

Fox622003

Gold Member
Hey Gavin, short question here.
What do you use on your bass drum head hole? I saw a cool chromed ring-thing on the Arriving Somewhere DVD and not sure where to get one of those or what brand it is. Because I recently holed the resonant head of my bass drum and not sure what to put on it.
Thanks!

Fox.
 

NeuroAxis

Member
2.- I bought your Rhythmic Horizons DVD, it's great :D. I have one question regarding overriding: In this chapter you suggest different subdivisions for overriding with the hi-hat e.g. quarter notes 8ths and every 3 16ths. The relation between quarter notes and 8ths is obvious, but is there any logical relation to overriding with every 3 16ths? Or is it arbitrary and could just as well have been overriding with every 5 16ths for instance?
I'm not Gavin but I have been studying this DVD for years. If I understand what you're asking, I don't really see what could be considered arbitrary about using 3/16ths rather than eights or quarters; it certainly sounds less common in the context of Western popular music, because 85% of pop music is in quarters or eights. But I don't think the fact that we hear that pattern less frequently in music makes it more or less arbitrary than patterns we do hear more frequently.

It was only when I really started to focus on counting out loud that the 3/16ths patterns really started to make sense to me. Most of the patterns on Rhythmic Horizons are too fast to count full 16ths ("1 e and a"), but I count the 3/16ths overrides like triplets "1 and a, 2 and a, 3 and a..." and in that framework the 8th notes would fall on the "1" and "a" of the first group of 3/16ths and the "and" of the second group of 3/16ths, and it just repeats like that over and over. So if you play the 3/16ths on a ride or hi-hat cymbal counting them like triplets and tap your hi-hat foot in the original 8th note pattern, it really starts to make more sense as a regular--if a bit uncommon--rhythmic structure.
 

asmodeus

Junior Member
Hi again! I forgot one thing I wanted to ask:

can you explain how playing "laid back" works? Does it actually mean some element of the drum is somewhat late measured by the click (bass-drum and snare maybe?)? In this setting is there something that is strictly on time (hi-hat?)?

Cheers
 

steste50

Junior Member
Hello Gavin,

I finally got the latest MD Festival dvd and got to see you on that stage. I was wondering if you (as well as the other drummers) took part at the mixing process of the drum sound because every drummer sounds very similar to what you find on their other recordings, you too.

Thank You,
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi miha

Hey Gavin, how's the drum recording going?

It's finished and came out great. I was very happy with the studio and engineer.

Hi xopethx

My question is this - over your career, as you performed with different groups and your time began to become more precious, how did that affect your personal practice time? Did you find that playing, in general, was good enough?

When I'm playing a lot (live or in sessions) I don't really have the time to practise too much. I still have ideas that I want to explore and I write them down at a sound check or between takes on a session - then when I do get more time - I can work on them. I miss having the chance to practise whenever I feel like it - as I can do at home. Usually I start off a tour full of ideas and my technique is up and running at full steam - by the end of the tour I'm struggling to get through the show - physically and mentally.

Hi asmodeus

1.- I'm playing in a band and obviously drums are loud enough, so there's no need to put them through the PA-system, BUT they sound dry overall, especially the snare drum. In a recording situation one always puts some sort of hall on it. So the question would be if you (or anybody else reading this thread) have any experience/recommendation regarding drum effects (hall) in a rehearsal situation.
(By the way: I'm the bass player in the band, but I wanted to ask you before I suggest anything to my drummer :p)


I (and most of the band) play with 'in-ear-monitors' so it's easy for me to put some reverb on the drums. Usually just the snare and toms. This reverb is built in to our Yamaha 02R96 monitor desk. It's not the greatest reverb I've ever heard but it's a big improvement over having none. In your situation - try a mic on the snare drum - send it too a reverb unit (set to 100% wet - so there's none of the dry signal coming through) and then just put the output of the unit into the PA. That way you won't have the actual snare in the PA but you'll hear just the reverb ringing after the drummer hits the snare.

2.- I bought your Rhythmic Horizons DVD, it's great :D. I have one question regarding overriding: In this chapter you suggest different subdivisions for overriding with the hi-hat e.g. quarter notes 8ths and every 3 16ths. The relation between quarter notes and 8ths is obvious, but is there any logical relation to overriding with every 3 16ths? Or is it arbitrary and could just as well have been overriding with every 5 16ths for instance?

You could in theory make any regular spaced subdivision an override - how useful or musical it would sound is another story. I picked those quarter notes 8ths and 3/16 ths becuase the distance between each note isn't too big - so there's more chance of people latching on to them. That's the whole point of overriding - to set up a way for people to feel a secondary pulse - and one that is less complicated than the one it's sitting on top of.

Hi Fox622003

What do you use on your bass drum head hole? I saw a cool chromed ring-thing on the Arriving Somewhere DVD and not sure where to get one of those or what brand it is.


I think it's from a company called "holz".

Hi asmodeus

can you explain how playing "laid back" works? Does it actually mean some element of the drum is somewhat late measured by the click (bass-drum and snare maybe?)? In this setting is there something that is strictly on time (hi-hat?)?

It's more of a feeling - you play the way you normally play in terms of the relationship between your hi hat/snare/bass drum but just play it all a bit later. I try to play my bass drum in time with my hi hat - same with my snare drum - because I don't want to hear a flam between anything. The whole 'laying back' thing is something you have to know how it sounds (listen to some Jeff Porcaro.) - plus how it feels when you're doing it. It gives an impression of being very comfortable/confident/big/luxurious. It took me many years to be able to do it.

Hi steste50

I finally got the latest MD Festival dvd and got to see you on that stage. I was wondering if you (as well as the other drummers) took part at the mixing process of the drum sound because every drummer sounds very similar to what you find on their other recordings, you too.

Yes I mixed my section of that DVD. I don't know about the other guys - maybe they mixed theirs too?

cheers
Gavin
 
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