Gavin Harrison here!

NeuroAxis

Member
I know this kind of thing isn't up to you personally, but any chance of a wider King Crimson tour? There are lots of us Crim-heads who don't have the advantage of living in or near a major city.
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi DTrocks,

When will you release your next dvd? (with PT) Next year?

We're going to film it this October - so I would imagine it would be released sometime near the middle of next year.

Hi NeuroAxis,

I know this kind of thing isn't up to you personally, but any chance of a wider King Crimson tour?

I can assure you that I have no influence on where KC might tour in the future. If you really want to see it - I guess you're going to have to travel.

cheers
Gavin
 

DTrocks

Member
This isn't a very drum related question but what is the song "Trains" really about? Steven writes a lot about trains, for example in Hatesong, Trains, at the end of Lazarus(train-sounds) and in some song on Foabp. Do steven have a special interest on trains? Haha..looking forward to hear your answer on this one.

Cheers!
 
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Citizen Insane

Senior Member
I have two questions Mr.Harrison.

1, I know that you can read notes, how important would you say it is for drummers to read notes? Would you say it is of equal importance compared to a violin or piano?

2, I understand that you have a 14x7 Recording Custom snare in your collection. I have a similiar snare (14x7 birch custom absolute) and I was wondering what head combo, and snare wires you use for your RC snare? I'm aiming for a similiar snare sound as yours. I think that you have one of the best all around snare drum sound in the business.

Greatly appreciated,

Ronan
 

ZDrums24

Senior Member
I have two questions Mr.Harrison.

1, I know that you can read notes, how important would you say it is for drummers to read notes? Would you say it is of equal importance compared to a violin or piano?
I'm not Gavin, but as a drummer who gigs quite a bit (and as a music education major), I have a hopefully viable opinion on this topic. Basically, reading notes is like reading any written language. No, you don't need to read to get through life as a gigging drummer (we play timbre oriented instruments as opposed to melodic), but it cuts you off from so many resources. Also, not being able to read music limits the number of gigs you can get into. I do a musical or two in the area every year. These gigs pay great (upwards of $200) and take up very little time (usually 2 shows and 2-3 reheasals max), but the trade off is that if you can't read the book, it becomes much harder to hit the ground running and put on a successful show (especially since most performance cds bare little resemblance to the books provided). Reading is a skill that just widens your options by giving you access to a form of communication that happens to be a lot easier and more practical to use than recordings or learning by ear. I also find the visual representation of a drum set pattern can often make it easier to grasp some more complicated concepts.

just thought I'd throw my two cents in.
 

NeuroAxis

Member
I also find the visual representation of a drum set pattern can often make it easier to grasp some more complicated concepts.
Agreed. I learned to read music when I took piano lessons as a boy, then completely forgot how to do it when I gave up the piano. A few years later I started to get serious about drumming and now I am trying to reteach myself how to read. I found when learning the overriding exercises on Rhythmic Horizons that after learning the beats by feel or by programming them into a drum machine and slowing the tempo way down, playing them while watching the notation on a music stand beside my set made the pattern make a whole lot more sense.

I still have a long way to go before I can sight read again, but I think it is a really important skill to have as a working drummer.
 
I'm not Gavin, but as a drummer who gigs quite a bit (and as a music education major), I have a hopefully viable opinion on this topic. Basically, reading notes is like reading any written language. No, you don't need to read to get through life as a gigging drummer (we play timbre oriented instruments as opposed to melodic), but it cuts you off from so many resources. Also, not being able to read music limits the number of gigs you can get into. I do a musical or two in the area every year. These gigs pay great (upwards of $200) and take up very little time (usually 2 shows and 2-3 reheasals max), but the trade off is that if you can't read the book, it becomes much harder to hit the ground running and put on a successful show (especially since most performance cds bare little resemblance to the books provided). Reading is a skill that just widens your options by giving you access to a form of communication that happens to be a lot easier and more practical to use than recordings or learning by ear. I also find the visual representation of a drum set pattern can often make it easier to grasp some more complicated concepts.

just thought I'd throw my two cents in.
Well said :)
the thing is.....if you want to go deeper into the technical aspect of drumming you need to know how to read
odd time signatures and polyrhythms can be easily understood if you have them written out on paper
there is an easier option though...."tabs"
it gets the work done
but youl be lost on dynamics and might come across problems where triplets are concerned :)
well this is what i think....i could be terribly wrong :)
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi DTrocks,

This isn't a very drum related question but what is the song "Trains" really about?

You'd need to ask Steven about that - and his interest in trains in general.

Hi Citizen Insane,

I know that you can read notes, how important would you say it is for drummers to read notes? Would you say it is of equal importance compared to a violin or piano?

I think it's important - I use that skill all the time - whether it's working out complex rhythms or quickly writing out charts that I can read for a gig or session. My sight reading is probably not as good as it once was - I tend not to find myself in situations that require it anymore - but years ago I did a lot of it and it saved me from going hungry. I certainly couldn't have developed my Rhythmic Illusion ideas without it.

I understand that you have a 14x7 Recording Custom snare in your collection. I have a similiar snare (14x7 birch custom absolute) and I was wondering what head combo, and snare wires you use for your RC snare? I'm aiming for a similiar snare sound as yours. I think that you have one of the best all around snare drum sound in the business.

I cut mine down to 5.5 inches - for some reason I just can't seem to find 'my sound' in drums that are more than that depth. 5 inches depth is my favorite. As I've said before - I use Puresound snare wires cut down to 8 strands (I take off the outside ones and leave 8 in the middle). Head combo is usually a Remo coated CS on the top (sometimes a coated Pinstripe) and an Ambassador snare side. I normally use an 'O' ring for muffling and an "S-Hoop" on the top side of the drum.

cheers
Gavin
 

Bernhard

Founder Drummerworld
Staff member
Hi Gavin

I congratulate you for the big gig - Modern Drummer Festival Weekend.

Great to see and makes me feel good that ALL appearing drummers are personal friends of Drummerworld:

Gavin, Simon, Billy, Todd, Thomas, Dafnis, Derek, Ndugu.....so great!!

Bernhard
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Gus,

Any plans for clinics in Spain during concerts with PT in october??.

Sorry but I won't have time.

Hi AndresPT,

when Porcupine Tree will come to South America (chile) ...


We have no plans to come to South America at the moment. Any announcements about concerts anywhere in the world will be at www.porcupinetree.com first.

Hi Bernhard,

I congratulate you for the big gig - Modern Drummer Festival Weekend.

Yes - nobody could be happier about it than me. Will we see you there?

Hi Kalma,

when and how did you get an sonor-endorser?


I was playing in Italy in 2000 when I met Tony Italia (the Sonor distributor for Australia). He really wanted me to play Sonor drums and told all the Sonor management about me. When I got home (late 2000) I got a call from Ian Croft (the artists relations manager) and he lent me a Sonor Designer kit. I really liked it so I switched to playing Sonor around the start of 2001 and I've been happily playing them ever since.

Cheers
Gavin
 

David Floegel

Silver Member
Hi again,

Gavin: What do you think of the Sonor Artist Snare 14*05 Scandinavian Birch (Vintage Maple)?
Did you ever test it? What heads would you suggest to use?
I think about buying it.
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Kalma,

I haven't actually tried that particular snare. I've never played a Sonor snare I didn't like and it looks very nice. Be careful that it's a vintage rim - so if you're going play rock on it - I'd opt for a regular rim - otherwise it will eat up your sticks and you might damage the vintage rim or clamps.

cheers
Gavin
 

Joe P

Senior Member
Hey Gavin! Correct me if I'm wrong, but I heard you use S-hoops on your snare drums. Do you think they affect the sound of your snare [probably the rimshots more than anything else], and does it really keep sticks from getting all chewed up from rim shots?
 

Matt Grondin

Junior Member
Hi Gavin, apparently (looking at the multitude of pages here) you are a very patient guy who is willing to share. It's much appreciated. This is my first post, although I frequent this site... I'm a lowly guitar player, but I also produce records for my band and others and have a great interest in killer drum sounds.

Your snare sound, not to mention the rest of the kit, sounds absolutely amazing and the drum sounds on "In Absentia" have actually prompted me to contact Tim Palmer about mixing our next record. It sounds THAT good. That said, and please forgive me if these have already been addressed, could you share some light on a few things if you don't mind:

1. If you remember what snare was on that record, I'd love to know.

2. What current production snares, or vintage even, could get me in that ballpark that you might recommend? I've got some extra money and don't care how much it takes... I want a GREAT snare sound... my DW Edge is really nice, but it doesn't have the crack, depth, and sensitivity that you seem to get, and I work with some really great drummers and have excellent signal chains.

3. Were the drum sounds pretty much that sweet at the time of tracking, or did Tim just take it to a whole other level?

Thanks man, I appreciate your time. If you're curious about our music, it can be heard at sonicbids.com/incamaya. There's some decent drum sounds, but you guys set the bar pretty high with that record. Later.
 

Gavin Harrison

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Hi Joe P,
Yes I've been using S-Hoops for about a year now and I really like them.
They do subtly change the sound of the snare and help with heavy back beats... and make nice loud sounding rim clicks. I think they're kinder to the sticks too. They're stiffer than a normal triple flange so it helps with consistency in tuning.
If you're someone (like me) who uses "O" rings to dampen the snare then it's great because they never fly out. In fact you can hold the drum upside down and the ring still doesn't fall out.

Cheers
Gavin
 
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