GAS for a new kit question- I need perspective!!!

Dditto

Member
Hello all-

First time poster, long time lurker. GAS (gear acquisition syndrome) has really been with me since I bought a new Sonor Vintage series snare. I have a mid 80s Yamaha Recording Custom that I love (and swore I’d be buried with) BUT...I am starting to feel that it’s time to move on. The only options I’m considering is either a DW Collectors (like but maple, eh) or a Sonor SQ1 or Vintage series. I’ve been so impressed with the Sonor’s I’m seriously thinking I might put the Yammies up for sale. Here’s the thing- I don’t want to regret selling my prized yammies, so I am needing some perspective. This isn’t a which kit is better question as much as it is a I need to bounce this off of my brethren and get feedback. Thanks to all.
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
The only one I would consider from your options are the Vintage for a different sound. The SQ1 is limited in sizes, shell types, and finishes. If you want Sonor save up a bit more and grab a used SQ2. I have a DW Collector's and I haven't touched it in years. It's definitely not a bad kit, but I have several others I prefer much more.

Try to hold onto the Recording Custom as well if at all possible. You'll be looking for another one in a few years if you don't. You seem attached to it.
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
Try to hold onto the Recording Custom as well if at all possible. You'll be looking for another one in a few years if you don't. You seem attached to it.
I totally agree with hanging onto the Recording Custom kit if at all possible. Sometimes you don't know what you have until it's gone.

I'll muddy the waters a bit by suggesting you take a look at the Noble & Cooley Horizon Series drums (maple/mahogany) for a new kit.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
If you can buy a new kit without having to sell the Yamahas, I'd say do that
and store the Yamaha set away somewhere till you sort out where they both stand.
 

RickP

Gold Member
I have owned two Yamaha Recording Custom Kits and currently own a Noble and Cooley Horizon kit and a Sonor Vintage series kit . I would take the Noble and Cooley Horizon kit over either the Yamaha or Sonor kits. This is no slight to Yamaha or the Sonor . It is just the N&C kit sounds outstanding , probably the best sounding set of drums I have ever played and the build quality is superb. Very rich and resonant with very full sounding bass drums ( a shortcoming of the Yamaha RC) and not drier sounding like the Sonor Vintage .

They are all excellent drums , of the kits listed in the OP’s opening thread , I would take the Sonor Vintage .
 

Super Phil

Senior Member
For me Gear Acquisition Syndrome typically means acquiring gear without giving up gear... consequently I have 6 drum sets. 😄
Keep the Recording Customs and go buy a new set as well....if finances and space permit.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
What kind of sound are you going for? What kind of sound will work for the bands you are hoping to play with?

I love the Sonor Vintage Series, but if I'm honest, they don't work for every situation as well as some other options.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I'd definitely keep the RCs if possible.

If the RC vibe lives in you, but you're after a more rounded / resonant delivery with greater tonal "weight", then consider the VintageFlat Custom from Kumu. The standard all birch custom from Kumu is essentially Yamaha RCs on steroids - IMHO, the best birch ply drums in the world.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
I decided any new acquisitions going forward must be vintage. Collectable. I concentrate on snares. That way I keep one kit for gigging and everything else for collecting and playing for fun. It's exciting and a passion to hunt down a birch Premier made in UK snare, or a Slingerland 3-ply from 1960's, or an original Ludwig Acro from 60's. Gretsch Dixieland. Rogers with script logo but without b&b lugs. Tama made in Japan. Pearl with script logo badge. I look for the deals on excellent condition and low price. They're out there. Like guy who put up for sale new old stock black drum. It had original sales tag from 70's It was a Ludwig Blackrolite. $29. Yeah they're out there. It's kinda a hobby now and satisfies my GAS.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I have no need for a new kit, and I still love the same kit I've been playing since the mid 90's.

But I do somewhat regret not buying a Yamaha RC to begin with.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I decided any new acquisitions going forward must be vintage. Collectable. I concentrate on snares.
Another perspective...Today's great drums are tomorrow's vintage treasures. I wish I had kept my Tama Bell brass from the mid 70's. Or my 76 - 3 ply bowling ball blue Ludwigs. I would have sold them today for a nice profit. I thought they were dogs at the time so I practically gave them away. Today's drums are much better quality. (Not that the Tama was bad quality, I just didn't like it, it could have been me) Spotting the future treasures...that would be a nice skill. I think that today's drums for sure have what it takes to become the great vintage drums of the future.

Thoughts?
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
For me, every kit or snare I own is a learning experience. Sometimes it's a challenge to get it dialed in just right, but it doing so helps me grow. If you keep it for a while you can turn a profit or at least break even. So in that sense it's a free education. You can always become a drum tech. :alien:
 

Dditto

Member
You guys are the best. I realized that my yammies are perfect and exactly what I always have wanted. Instead of selling, I changed my setup from 10, 12, 14, 16 to 10, 16 and moved cymbals all around to different spots. I’ve always liked pinstripes on them, so I am going to be trying some new head combos. My wife says thank you to all of you for helping me keep a level head. She had the same answer as all of you. I really should listen to her more. 😃
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
You guys are the best. I realized that my yammies are perfect and exactly what I always have wanted. Instead of selling, I changed my setup from 10, 12, 14, 16 to 10, 16 and moved cymbals all around to different spots. I’ve always liked pinstripes on them, so I am going to be trying some new head combos. My wife says thank you to all of you for helping me keep a level head. She had the same answer as all of you. I really should listen to her more. 😃
After the initial honeymoon phase wears off, at the end of the day, they're all just drums.

You wanted to move on when truly, the grass isn't any greener. But you got past that, nice.

Any drum set can be used for any genre IMO.

Cymbals...it's nice to have genre appropriate cymbals.

Mid 80's aged RC's are wonderful drums that you will torture yourself over if you sell.

Drums can be set up so many different ways to get different sounds out of them. Want a new sound? Change heads and tuning.

I wish cymbals were as changeable.

All the different heads and all the possible tuning combinations are so high in number that the cost for a different sound is a few bucks and a little time. I end up going for the same tuning I like no matter what drums I have. The snare will vary but the toms...I chase one particular tone.

There comes a point where it's good to say, yes, my equipment is more than up to the task, let's move on to the next thing.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Another perspective...Today's great drums are tomorrow's vintage treasures. I wish I had kept my Tama Bell brass from the mid 70's. Or my 76 - 3 ply bowling ball blue Ludwigs. I would have sold them today for a nice profit. I thought they were dogs at the time so I practically gave them away. Today's drums are much better quality. (Not that the Tama was bad quality, I just didn't like it, it could have been me) Spotting the future treasures...that would be a nice skill. I think that today's drums for sure have what it takes to become the great vintage drums of the future.

Thoughts?
Indeed today's drums will be treasured in the future, but I think it'll be to a much lesser degree. Today's drums are built better, they will last longer, and there's a LOT more of them (than in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.) Because there's so much saturation today, future vintage drums won't quite have the same appeal as current vintage drums.

Kinda like baseball cards pre-1990s. Older cards were rare and they had value. Then card collecting went mainstream and the market was over-saturated to the point that cards in the 1990s became practically worthless. This isn't a perfect comparison (cards are just paper, while drums are practical) but it gets the point across.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Indeed today's drums will be treasured in the future, but I think it'll be to a much lesser degree. Today's drums are built better, they will last longer, and there's a LOT more of them (than in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.) Because there's so much saturation today, future vintage drums won't quite have the same appeal as current vintage drums.

Kinda like baseball cards pre-1990s. Older cards were rare and they had value. Then card collecting went mainstream and the market was over-saturated to the point that cards in the 1990s became practically worthless. This isn't a perfect comparison (cards are just paper, while drums are practical) but it gets the point across.
Hmm. Nice analogy. You make good points, especially the sheer numbers of sets these days. It will be interesting to see how it plays out.

Today's drums are built better. I wonder if that will be enough to insure collectability. Who knows if real acoustic drums will even be a thing in 50 years.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Indeed today's drums will be treasured in the future, but I think it'll be to a much lesser degree. Today's drums are built better, they will last longer, and there's a LOT more of them (than in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.) Because there's so much saturation today, future vintage drums won't quite have the same appeal as current vintage drums.

Kinda like baseball cards pre-1990s. Older cards were rare and they had value. Then card collecting went mainstream and the market was over-saturated to the point that cards in the 1990s became practically worthless. This isn't a perfect comparison (cards are just paper, while drums are practical) but it gets the point across.
I agree.

In the late 80s, vintage collectors wanted 1969 and earlier drums.

Now, 30 years later, collectors still mostly just want pre-1969 era drums. With a few 70's era thrown in .

A drumset from 1985 is now 31 years old, and (outside of maybe the Yamaha RC), they hold no particular appeal to collectors.
 
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