Food for Musical thought...

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
it's an interesting question and I think there are several key cultural phenomena that are related.

I remember when Aerosmith was inducted into the Hall of Fame I was walking up town with a friend and the guys were outside their hotel signing autographs. But it was for 12-14 year olds who were there with their dads. Previous to the late nineties, kids music listening and adolescent angst was involved with reacting against their parents; but such is not the case any more. Kids ten to have a better relationship with their folks then was typical in the 1950s-60s,70s and 80s. When I was fifteen, I would have never listen to my dads music.

The other reality is that the technology and instrumentation for rock music and jazz was new and avant-gard back in the day, not only saxophone, guitar and the drum set; but later the moog and synclavier. You had new instrumentation, then it was you electrified and then it was synthesized. So there was an element of the new.
 
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DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
It's an interesting article, although I wish it had gone into more detail.

But I've noticed that yeah, a song from this week and a song from 10 years ago don't sound that much different, at least not when you're comparing 80's to the 70's. Alt rock and power pop haven't changed much in 10 or 15 years.

And retro is certainly big.

When I was a teen in the 80's, looking back at the 60's was a big thing. And in the late 90's, early 2000's, looking back at the 80's became a big thing. And now in 2009/2010, well, looking back at the 60s and and 80's are still a big thing. Rock Band and such have made a whole new generation of kids take a huge interested in older music.

Obviously newer music still sell, but where I can draw a line between 80's and 90's music, I tend to find it harder to draw the line between 90's and 2000's (with certain exceptions).

I often wonder what is coming next. While jazz has it's roots go back earlier, it's hey day was approx 40-60years long. Rock n roll is now over 50 years old. Which makes me wonder if something we've never thought of will come up and move rock over the way rock did to jazz. Some argue hip-hop and rap already has, but that tends to be a subjective topic because there has always been a lot of cross over between the two styles, although there has always been a lot of cross over between rock and jazz as well.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I was told that rock and roll will never die.

They better not screw around with that or they'll have one mad dude on their hands.
 

madgolfer

Senior Member
Perhaps as a product of our technological age (which I love), there are many "doers" and not so many involved with big picture issues. I think people are still trying to figure out what to do with all the musical information at our disposal. Record companies are partly to blame, because they are not pushing new music.

What permeates the media is prepackaged fodder for the less musically engaged. There is not necessarily anything wrong with this as people are still enjoying listening to music, it is just that the nature of this music hasn't changed radically since its inception. Just updated by generations. Companies are pushing formulas that work, rather than experiment with new styles and groups/artists.

The music is out there, and may potentially combine world music with technological applications (or something else). It is just being supplanted by the musical "Right" much in the way oil companies supplant new green technologies.

Support your local musicians! Variety lies with them.
 

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
It's an interesting article, although I wish it had gone into more detail.

But I've noticed that yeah, a song from this week and a song from 10 years ago don't sound that much different, at least not when you're comparing 80's to the 70's. Alt rock and power pop haven't changed much in 10 or 15 years.

And retro is certainly big.
I think you have to go hear the lecture to get more detail. :)


Every decade does have its nostalgia. I have noticed recently that there has been a surge of ads for musicians looking for others to play 90s music. I guess that would include Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Soundgarden, STP, Rage Against the Machine and Alice 'n Chains. 1990s nostalgia has begun and soon there will be the requisite that 90s tv show.

I think you are right that even by the mid-60s anything five years old was very old as compared to The Beatles; and by the mid-seventies everything that was five years old was ancient, even the Beatles. The 80s totally changed the way people heard music with music video, whatever happened to that. :)
 
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