Flams on an ekit

Is it just me or are flams a bit tricky on an ekit? I'm doing them successfully on the practice pad, but I don't know if it's the fact that I'm then going to the electronic kit or if it's because the pads on the kit are smaller than my practice pad
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I'm not an expert on ekits, but my experience tells me that different pads perform very differently. The higher-end pads are much more responsive.

As for true rudimental flams—the kind with soft grace notes—I've yet to play an edrum that was sensitive enough to handle those well. But I'm sure they exist for the right price.
 
I'm not an expert on ekits, but my experience tells me that different pads perform very differently. The higher-end pads are much more responsive.

As for true rudimental flams—the kind with soft grace notes—I've yet to play an edrum that was sensitive enough to handle those well. But I'm sure they exist for the right price.
That could be my problem - My kit is an entry level kit, rubber pads, not the best cymbals; but I am learning. Ghost notes are quite difficult for me on this kit.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I'm not a fan of e-kits for anything requiring subtlety, ghost notes, etc..

Are there any e-kits that you can play a good soft buzz roll on? I don't know.
 

Brian

Gold Member
I'm not a fan of e-kits for anything requiring subtlety, ghost notes, etc..

Are there any e-kits that you can play a good soft buzz roll on? I don't know.
The higher end stuff, you can get away with soft buzzes, but even so they are not perfect. On 80% of kits, the notes will be lost when the trigger drops out and that comes fairly quickly for most lower end kits; especially with rubber pads.

However I still maintain my 2007 Roland TD-12 is excellent and I don't ever feel like I am "stepping down" to an e-kit, when away from my real drums.

On-topic: I wouldn't expect flams to have issues though, that seems weird.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
For practicing flams on my DTX532, I tend to work the flams on two instruments (two toms or tom/snare) instead of a single instrument. When I practice closed flams on a single instrument, the module sometimes gets confused. Open flams seem to work pretty well.
 
Thanks for the response. I should have mentioned the difficulty is when I try to practice just flams on the snare. When working on a new beat or fill, I don't have as much trouble. I do have a lower end kit with plans to buy better by the end of the year.
 
For practicing flams on my DTX532, I tend to work the flams on two instruments (two toms or tom/snare) instead of a single instrument. When I practice closed flams on a single instrument, the module sometimes gets confused. Open flams seem to work pretty well.
This is good to know. However, as a beginner (1 year) I can't make those flams as closed/tight as I would like. But open flams are okay too!
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
If you can't hear a flam on your e-kit, I'd wager you need to mess about with the pad's settings in the module. I have a crappy td-3, and flams are no problem for it on any of the pads.

Don't forget to mess with the "cross talk" or "x-talk" settings for the pad. Lots of times vibration from the drum strike or the rack/stands will trigger a second hit when you don't want it too, so they actually do "cancel" out triggers that it feels are not intentional.

Hard to say without being in front of it, but you should be able to play flams fine.
 

ronyd

Silver Member
Thanks for the response. I should have mentioned the difficulty is when I try to practice just flams on the snare. When working on a new beat or fill, I don't have as much trouble. I do have a lower end kit with plans to buy better by the end of the year.
There are other nuisances when using lower end e-kits. Just be careful and try different e-kits before spending more money. check out this site and read threads and ask questions:
http://vdrums.com

I spent alot of time understanding e-kits. Foo for thought: I ended up converting one of my acoustic kits to an e-kit. Built my own triggers, etc. Much more realistic sitting at a real kit setup and for much less money.

One thing I can suggest if you need to play quietly and have goods response is this:
  1. Get the Aquarian Super pads.
  2. Get the Zildjian low-volume cymbal pack

The Aquarian pads have great feel, realistic bounce, and you got some tone from them since they are on the drum. Zildjian's low volume cymbals are just that, but have a good fell to them also. The end result is you are playing on your acoustic kit, getting all the responsiveness you would expect from the drum head, and eliminating all the nuisances of the e-kits.

Yes, it's cool to have all the different sounds and kit types on e-kits, but the novelty wears off once you discover flams, double stroke rolls, etc don;t seem to be up to your standards.

Not that I have spent alot of time and effort constructing and playing around with setting on e-kits, I prefer the aquarian pad and zildjian route. Buy a mixer, Mic up your drumkit if you want, plug in the mics, music or metronome, headphones and your a happy camper playing pretty quiet. When you want the real thing, take the pads off, replace with your real cymbals, and back to a normal drum kit.

Caveat: if you really need to play absolutely quiet, then the only option is the e-kit. I did a sound check outside my room door shut, windows open, with the pads and cymbals, and was hardly noticeable. My wife, and certainly neighbors never complain at all. Of course, I own my home, so not in an apartment or condo.

hope this info helps you on your journey.
 

bonerpizza

Silver Member
It depends on what e-kit you're using what pads and module and all that nonsense, I had a cheap Yamaha e-kit many years ago with rubber pads and flams didn't exist on that thing but the high end Roland kits are flammable!
 

ronyd

Silver Member
It depends on what e-kit you're using what pads and module and all that nonsense, I had a cheap Yamaha e-kit many years ago with rubber pads and flams didn't exist on that thing but the high end Roland kits are flammable!
Yes for sure. Depends how much money your willing to spend on the Roland or Yamaha. It's a tough decision.
 
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