First Recording Experience *cries*

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DSCRAPRE

Guest
So this week I got an offer from a good friend of mine to record drums for a song that he wrote. I liked the song a lot and I don't have anything else going on, so I decided to do it. Long story short, I blew it. My timing was suspect, I sounded very nervous (this being my first time recording) and I never really played the song before although I did compose the drum parts in advance. The guy that recorded me said that he'd be able to edit out the mistakes, but that doesn't make me feel better. I mean, I should be able to play a simple song by now, damnit! I'm still waiting to hear the final product, although I'm not really looking forward to it.
 

Nodiggie

Gold Member
Don't beat yourself up over it, it happens to everyone one time or another in recording sessions. Consider it a learning experience, the more studio work you do the more relaxed you will be. Studio work certainly puts you under a microscope and that's a good thing. Congrats on the session.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
First, you cry.

Then you get to work.

I feel ya brother. It's part of improving, realizing you suck. Learned a lot though right? You always learn the most from your failures.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Same thing here. It happens. Best advice is to learn from it, take the criticism constructively and use it. I spent a lot of time after my first poor showing in the studio firming up some of my faults,and it has made a lot of difference subsequently. If your timing is suspect, sequester with a metronome. If your nerves are the problem, rehearse the part until you could play it in your sleep.
 

PacifRick

Senior Member
If the drums were all that you've heard so far, I think you'll be surprised about how good it sounds after everything else is layered on top. I have had the same thoughts in the past, only to realize it wasn't as bad after all once the rest of the music is applied, not that it's an excuse to perform poorly. I'd say you being nervous already, heightened your awareness of mistakes more than usual. Hang in there!
 
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DSCRAPRE

Guest
Thanks guys. I'm beginning the process of getting the part down pat tomorrow. After all, I wrote the drum part, so there is no reason why I shouldn't be able to play it.

As for the metronome thing, I've been doing it, but apparently not enough. Time for some serious wood shedding!

This is why I love drummerworld, people here have been there before and always know how to make a guy feel better.
 

Redfern

Senior Member
Ive only ever recorded once too, it was a massive shock to me just how much pressure i felt at the time, i messed up soooo many times on things ive been playing for ages with no problems, even now i listen back on that recording and cringe, but now that ive had the experience, i know what to expect and i think ill be a bit more relaxed, ive no doubt you will too! :D
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
When I went to University I couldn't play as regularly as I would like. I moved back from University a few weeks ago and threw some microphones in front of my kit and realised that my playing had suffered. I hadn't even realised until then!

Don't worry. It happens!
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
Yep had the same experience a few years ago on my first session in a studio. I still cringe when I listen back to it now. The most noticable mistake to me was messing up the simplest fill on a song with a shuffle rhythm. I ended a phrase with hi-tom then low-tom, you know, da-dum.. except the dum was just that little bit too late. The problem is nobody else really noticed or cared much and it was the best take so that was that. Oh well!
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
This is one of the reasons that I tell drummers to record everything you do especially..practice The tape dosen't lie.Practice with and without a metronome and or a click,and compare the two.

I like to keep time with my left heel.Some guys sing out the time in their heads.Bonzo used to grunt out the time and his fills.Whatever works,but tape it....it will open up your eyes.

Steve B
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
Did the friend have to pay for studio time? Did he pay you or was this pro bono? Certainly those two factors can add to the stress and nerves.

My band has a gig tomorrow night, and we are going to try and secure additional gigs while we are there. If the place wants to take a break (we've been playing there regularly for a few months now), the our band leader decided we'll use the downtime to start recording. So I'm going to be a little nervous about that, since I've never officially "recorded" like that. The one good thing is that we will record in the same place we practice, on the same kit, so there are no time constraints or pressure. Still, we've recorded a lot of practices, and when I listen to the recording I pick out all my flaws and areas where I need to improve. I guess it is a process we all go through at one time or another.
 
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DSCRAPRE

Guest
Did the friend have to pay for studio time? Did he pay you or was this pro bono? Certainly those two factors can add to the stress and nerves.
No money was involved in any of this. We did the recording at another friend's house.

So far today I've played the song about 15 times. I think I'm ready.
 
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