Feeling Like I'm Disturbing Others Discourages Playing

larryz

Platinum Member
there is an old story about Buddy Rich and Louie Bellson staying in a hotel room together and spending the whole night sitting over a snare drum seeing who could play the quietest

this is a great thing to practice anytime.....but can come in very handy when you feel like there are people who may be disturbed by drums

drums don't have to be loud

this is a common misconception


....but yes....it can be very distracting when you feel you are disturbing others.....I know I cannot focus

I hate these alternatives ....but they are alternatives

mutes
electronic kit
pad kit
Yes yes yes... great suggestion. I agree. Playing quiet is tough but beneficial..
 

SgtThump

Platinum Member
I came from guitar, which has been my primary instrument for 27 years (I'm 40.) I could easily turn the volume down and let her rip anytime of the day or night.

Drums is a whole other thing and I agree that I feel like I'm bothering people. The neighbors are all cool with it and my significant other is too, so really, I'm worrying for no reason.

It kinda sucks to try new things and fail miserably with the entire neighborhood hearing it, but it is what it is! ha ha

I'm pretty over it now, but had to push myself to not think about it much.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
I don't believe you can, realistically, actually play them, especially bass, to a volume which the next door neighbours won't be troubled by.
I guarantee you could sit upstairs from the room I am practicing in with no more than TV on and not hear a sound if I was working on playing quietly
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
Another thing to try are those Rods drum stcks. They actually keep the volume down. add those to some sound offs and you will keep the volume to a minimum.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Get to know the people you are potentially annoying...and seek their opinion...does wonders in reducing anxiety that you might be ruining their day.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Get to know the people you are potentially annoying...and seek their opinion...does wonders in reducing anxiety that you might be ruining their day.
fantastic advice
.......................
 

rmandelbaum

Platinum Member
I kno wwhat your saying, I have been playing for over 30 years, I dont feel like just playing is othering neighbors but true practice. Playing someing over and over to nail it.

I have an electric kit and I love it for practice, no body has to hear anything ;-)
 

Lunar Satellite Brian

Senior Member
Although, yes, drums don't have to be loud, you have to admit that sometimes they are going to be loud, and forcing someone to be conscious about their volume and learning to play right off the bat probably isn't going to be the best way to start off playing the instrument.

I would recommend saving for a good, possibly used, electronic kit.
 
You could coincide your drumming with a neighbours leaf blowing / lawn mowing / screaming kids / howling, barking dogs. Keeps you on your toes. Got to be ready at a moments notice.
Like the Batman.
I wait for thunder storms.
 

The Black Page Dude

Senior Member
I have been using the Pearl mesh heads on my kit (super quiet) .... great alternative to pads as the mesh is tensionable ... you don't get the sounds but your definitley still get the practice in. For the cymbals I just use Vic Firth cumbal mutes.

I agree with the brush thing as well.

If you have a friend with a commercial space (ie garage, business etc) maybe they would rent you a back room for a nominal fee after business hours.

For awhile I had only a practice pad (which in reality is all you need), but took up the bass to expand my musical knowledege. I can honestly say now that I am able to play my "quiet kit", the months of bass scales and rudimentary practice has really honed some of my dynamics and co-ordination.
 

Bad Tempered Clavier

Silver Member
You could coincide your drumming with a neighbours leaf blowing / lawn mowing / screaming kids / howling, barking dogs. Keeps you on your toes. Got to be ready at a moments notice.
Like the Batman.
I wait for thunder storms.
Can't say fairer than this. Also, while I agree that it is important to be able to competently and comfortably play ppp it is equally important to be able to play fff. While brushes and ghost notes should be part of a drummer's vocabulary - so should the rim-shot.

This goes for other instruments, not just drums. Many times have I auditioned guitarists who have never used their amp outside the house and have no idea how to play with any real bollocks. Though a keen sense of subtle dynamics is to be encouraged it's going to do you sod-all good if you're into punk.
 
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