extreme tom angles and snare tilt

KamaK

Platinum Member
I've seen the cymbal thing before. It 'apparently' forces you to crash them properly instead of coming straight down on them. I was unable to get acclimated to it in the 48h I tried it. Hitting the crashes properly isn't something I typically have an issue with.
 

poika

Silver Member
Looks like he's playing on a downhill slope, but he sounds good and is definitely enjoying himself.
That's a cool set he's got, I was expecting to see ebay adds so this was nice. Ain't nothing wrong with these angles
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Good to see that Loretta Lynne still has her wonderful voice. As for the cymbals, I would think one would break more that way. Not going to test it.
 

evolving_machine

Silver Member
He has the toms over on his extreme left, and the snare is down extremely low. It almost looks to me like he he did not have the time to finish setting up. But, as stated before, he does a good job.

If this is done on purpose, is it to keep from doing rim shots, and keep from using the toms too much?
 

Cru Jones

Junior Member
is it to keep from doing rim shots
I would guess the opposite. It might be to help with doing rim shots... especially because the snare is so low.

When you think about arm and stick angles... it does seem like a somewhat natural way to play. I think Buddy Rich used to angle his snare away like that, but maybe not to that degree.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I can actually see it for the snare, but his toms way off to his left, its a ridiculous location and angle for my arms. i do enjoy seeing un-conventions for setups though.
 

evolving_machine

Silver Member
I would guess the opposite. It might be to help with doing rim shots... especially because the snare is so low.

When you think about arm and stick angles... it does seem like a somewhat natural way to play. I think Buddy Rich used to angle his snare away like that, but maybe not to that degree.
Buddy Rich had the snare higher, and he brought the side of the snare near him higher by angling it downward like that. I used to do that as well, mostly because the snare stands did not go high enough for me back than. Now it is easier to get a snare stand that goes higher. It is just hard for me to see how lowering the snare would allow rim shots to be played easier.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9esWG6A6g-k

The highest point of Buddy Rich's snare is much higher in the video attached.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Looks like more of an affectation to me. But if you can still play them like that, then hey, everybody's talking.

Buddy played more with his fingers over the top of the stick than the typical marching trad grip using the thumb. So his snare angle meant he only had to drop his hand slightly to get a rimshot.

This guy is actually pretty close to that same stick-hand-head relationship using a trad grip, only he slouching and dropping his hands low. Then he has to raise his arms quite a bit to play the other things.

Imagine going to a jam night and the house drummer is set up like this and won't let you move anything...
 

Nancy_C

Senior Member
Daru Jones is the drummer playing with Jack White now (and in that clip above). Here's a longish article about him.

"... And then there's the flair he brings to the drums. He often plays standing, rising to his feet mid-song. He alternates between traditional and matched grips, exaggerates his cymbal chokes, and throws his hands in the air inciting the crowd to bounce."

If he often stands during a song, it would help if the snare and toms were set up that way, I imagine.

He switches from traditional to match, depending on the situation.
 
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mikel

Platinum Member
Is that the same drummer Jack was using at festivals last Summer?

There were some close ups of him playing and his floor tom head was almost facing the audience. I have no idea how he manages to play like that or what lead him to that setup. Perhaps he has physical problems that make the setup more comfortable but it looks very ungainly to me, then again I like to make things as easy as posible.
 

boomstick

Silver Member
Maybe he started his career as busker with some crazy sidewalk setup. For the snare, he might have held a bucket or something between his legs and got used to playing in that position.
 

moxman

Silver Member
I saw a jazz drummer in NYC that played that way - except the snare was up higher around his waist on an extreme angle. He had to cross his left trad hand 'over' his right in order to hit the snare! (when playing hh-sn patterns). Weird setup - but a great drummer!
 
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